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  • 1
    In: Contemporary European History, 2018, Vol.27(2), pp.b1-b4
    Keywords: Back Cover (Ibc, Obc) And Matter
    ISSN: 0960-7773
    E-ISSN: 1469-2171
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  • 2
    In: Contemporary European History, 2018, Vol.27(2), pp.165-182
    Description: To sign the treaty creating the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) the foreign ministers of Belgium, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Luxembourg and the Netherlands met in Paris in April 1951. In a solemn Joint Declaration they stressed that through the newly created organisation, ‘the Contracting Parties have given their determination to set up the first supranational institution and thus lay the real foundations of an organised Europe’. The ministers represented the ECSC as a radical rupture with history, as if Europe had been completely disorganised until the new organisation's creation. In a similar vein, the ECSC Treaty emphasised the member states’ resolution ‘to substitute for historic rivalries a fusion of their essential interests; to establish, by creating an economic community, the foundation of a broad and independent community amongst peoples long divided by bloody conflicts’. Since 1951 official European Union (EU) documents and other sources have forged a similar image, one which has been undergirded by assumptions about the creation of the ‘core Europe’ of the ECSC as a collective ‘supranational’ break with a past characterised by severe ideological divisions and extreme nationalism.
    Keywords: Article
    ISSN: 0960-7773
    E-ISSN: 1469-2171
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  • 3
    In: Contemporary European History, 2018, Vol.27(2), pp.239-257
    Description: The European Coal and Steel Community was marked by institutional innovations. They have masked strong continuities in administrative and business communities and their governance practices, however, which persisted after 1945. Based on fresh research in national and international organisation archives, this article explores the origins before, during and after the First World War of two key elements of these practices, their evolution over time and their influence on post-war Western European governance of the steel sector: the struggle for executive autonomy and close transnational industry cooperation. Both practices clashed in the ECSC, became amalgamated and had lasting impact on the present-day European Union and its democratic deficit.
    Keywords: Article
    ISSN: 0960-7773
    E-ISSN: 1469-2171
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  • 4
    In: Contemporary European History, 2018, Vol.27(2), pp.348-349
    Description: The above published article by Kim Christiaens contains an error produced during production. We apologise to the author and readers for this error.
    Keywords: Errata
    ISSN: 0960-7773
    E-ISSN: 1469-2171
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  • 5
    In: Contemporary European History, 2018, Vol.27(2), pp.350-350
    Description: The original version of this article was published with the incorrect author name. The author's name should have appeared as “Luc-André Brunet”. We apologise to the authors and readers for this error and reproduce the entire corrected paper on the following pages.
    Keywords: Errata
    ISSN: 0960-7773
    E-ISSN: 1469-2171
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  • 6
    In: Contemporary European History, 2018, Vol.27(2), pp.301-325
    Description: This article sets out why and how plans to build Europe on mail, both commercially (rates) and symbolically (stamps), were discussed from the end of the 1920s and have failed up to today. The European Conference of Postal and Telecommunication Administrations (CEPT) was created during the intense phase of European integration in the 1950s. In the 1980s it was a key resource for the European Commission for building a Single Market in the telecommunication sector. As this article argues, however, the CEPT did not emerge from the multiple plans for postal integration. Rather, it was a new envelope hiding governance practices inherited from the nineteenth century.
    Keywords: Article
    ISSN: 0960-7773
    E-ISSN: 1469-2171
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  • 7
    In: Contemporary European History, 2018, Vol.27(2), pp.221-238
    Description: Since their foundation, the European Communities were characterised by a specific recipe for the labour market, centred on the promotion of labour mobility and a marked focus on vocational training and social dialogue. Drawing on an extensive range of primary sources, this article retraces the roots of that recipe in the reformist thinking of the interwar years, with a special point of reference in the International Labour Office. Identified within that body since the 1920s, the recipe evolved through the experiences of the great crisis and post-war demobilisation. It was then adapted to the needs of European economic integration.
    Keywords: Article
    ISSN: 0960-7773
    E-ISSN: 1469-2171
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  • 8
    In: Contemporary European History, 2018, Vol.27(2), pp.183-201
    Description: Scholars generally agree that ‘independent’ institutions such as the European Commission, the European Court of Justice and European Central Bank have created a space and role for themselves that has no equivalent in national political settings. However, we still lack a better understanding of the importance of this independent branch in the EU polity. This article contends that the central relevance of independence is connected to the historically rooted connection between ‘independence’ and ‘international government’ – a relationship the history of which can be traced back to the League of Nations’ foundational period as the inaugural scene for the nexus between power and knowledge in international politics. Ultimately, this article questions the extent to which this specific grammar of international government has been constitutive of the EC polity in terms of valued modes of legitimacy and types of authority.
    Keywords: Article
    ISSN: 0960-7773
    E-ISSN: 1469-2171
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  • 9
    In: Contemporary European History, 2018, Vol.27(2), pp.202-220
    Description: Based upon extensive multi-archival research, this article traces the long lineage of the notion of European electricity network. Since the 1930s engineers and policy makers conceived of a geographical conception for rationalising and optimising electricity supply: a European one. This article purports that three vectors undergirded threads of continuity: institutional, intellectual and physical (technological networks). These vectors, and the actors involved in them, created strong path dependencies that kept the idea of a European system firmly on the agenda. Today's international electricity market of the European Union should be seen as an extension of this legacy.
    Keywords: Article
    ISSN: 0960-7773
    E-ISSN: 1469-2171
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  • 10
    In: Contemporary European History, 2018, Vol.27(2), pp.326-344
    Description: This article challenges the idea that the Schuman Declaration of 9 May 1950 was a break with ideologies of the past. It traces the political economy of the declaration from the interwar to the post-war period. It reconstructs the conceptions of economics and politics that underlay the proposal, tracing them back to the once influential corporatist and communitarian ‘third way’ ideology. It then shows that the original intent of the declaration was nevertheless crushed by a powerful dynamic of institutionalisation of transnational parliamentarianism. Thus, the article demonstrates the effects of long-lasting cleavages on the institutionalisation of European organisations.
    Keywords: Article
    ISSN: 0960-7773
    E-ISSN: 1469-2171
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