Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Ecosystems, 2012, Vol.15(7), pp.1158-1172
    Description: In spite of the extensive area of bogs in the southern cone of South America, there have been very few studies on structure and dynamics of conifer bog forests in this region. Previously, it has been assumed that in the absence of intensive disturbance, the dominant conifer Pilgerodendron uviferum (D. Don) Florin would be replaced through other angiosperm species. Here we hypothesized (a) that this conifer can persist without intensive disturbances and develop into old-growth forests with continuing regeneration and (b) that high-severity disturbances through fire threaten its local persistence. To test this hypotheses, we analyzed diameter and age structure, foliar and soil nutrient levels and the light environment of old-growth and fire-disturbed P. uviferum stands on Chiloé Island (43ºS) in North Patagonia. Longevity (〉880 years), extremely slow growth (〈1 mm diameter per year) and tolerance to shade and stress are the main mechanisms of P. uviferum persistence in nutrient-poor and waterlogged conditions. Hence, old-growth P. uviferum forests are not a transitional phase in forest succession and may be maintained in the landscape for many centuries or millennia. However, in fire-disturbed stands, live trees of the species were rare and regeneration negligible, showing that high-severity fires can eliminate the species from parts of the landscape, where neither propagules nor seed trees survive. This underpins the importance of biological legacies such as seed trees for the recovery of disturbed sites, and points to the need for active restoration approaches to restore fire-degraded P. uviferum forests.
    Keywords: Chiloé Island ; Forest dynamics ; Light availability ; N/P ratio ; Persistence mechanisms ; Sphagnum
    ISSN: 1432-9840
    E-ISSN: 1435-0629
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Ecosystems, 2018, Vol.21(6), pp.1215-1229
    Description: Norway spruce is a widely cultivated species in Central Europe; however, it is highly susceptible to droughts, which are predicted to become more frequent in the future. A solution to adapt spruce forests to droughts could be the conversion to mixed-species stands containing species which are less sensitive to drought and do not increase the drought stress in spruce. Here we assessed the drought response of spruce and the presumably more drought-tolerant silver fir and Douglas fir in mixed-conifer stands. We measured tree ring widths of 270 target trees, which grew in mixed and mono-specific neighbourhoods in 18 managed stands in the Black Forest, to quantify the complementarity effects caused by species interactions on growth during the extreme drought event of 2003 and for a number of years with “normal” growth and climatic conditions. Mixed-species neighbourhoods did not significantly affect tree ring growth in normal years. However, during the drought, silver fir benefitted from mixing, while Douglas fir was more drought-stressed in the mixture. The drought response of spruce was dependent on the density and species composition of the neighbourhood, showing both positive and negative mixing effects. Mixed stands containing these tree species could improve adaptation to drought because the risks of extreme events are spread across species, and the performance of individual species is improved. Our knowledge about specific species interactions needs to be improved to manage tree mixtures more effectively with regard to the participating species and stand density.
    Keywords: Abies alba ; biodiversity ; climate change ; dendroecology ; drought stress ; Europe ; forest management ; mixed forest ; Picea abies ; Pseudotsuga menziesii
    ISSN: 1432-9840
    E-ISSN: 1435-0629
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages