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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in plant science, 2013, Vol.4, pp.534
    Description: One of the important factors that influences Zn deficiency tolerance and grain Zn loading in crops is the within-plant allocation of Zn. Three independent experiments were carried out to understand the internal Zn distribution patterns in rice genotypes grown in Zn-sufficient and Zn-deficient agar nutrient solution (ANS). In one of the experiments, two rice genotypes (IR55179 and KP) contrasting in Zn deficiency tolerance were leaf-labeled with (65)Zn. In the other two experiments, two Zn biofortification breeding lines (IR69428 and SWHOO) were either root- or leaf-labeled with (65)Zn. Rice genotype IR55179 showed significantly higher Zn deficiency tolerance than KP at 21 and 42 days after planting. When KP was Zn-deficient, it failed to translocate (65)Zn from the labeled leaf to newly emerging leaves. Similarly, the root-to-shoot translocation of unlabeled Zn was lower in KP than in IR55179. These results suggest that some Zn-efficient rice genotypes have greater ability to translocate Zn from older to actively growing tissues than genotypes sensitive to Zn deficiency. Among the two Zn biofortication breeding lines that were leaf-labeled with (65)Zn at 10 days before panicle initiation stage, (65)Zn distribution in the grains at maturity was similar between both genotypes in Zn-sufficient conditions. However, under Zn-deficient conditions, SWHOO accumulated significantly higher (65)Zn in grains than IR69428, indicating that SWHOO is a better remobilizer than IR69428. When the roots of these two Zn biofortication breeding lines were exposed to (65)Zn solution at 10 days after flowering, IR69428 showed higher root uptake of (65)Zn than SWHOO in Zn-sufficient conditions, but (65)Zn allocation in the aerial parts of the plant was similar between both genotypes.
    Keywords: Zn Biofortification ; Zn Deficiency Tolerance ; Zn Remobilization ; Continued Root Uptake ; Grain Zn ; Grain Zn Loading ; Rice
    ISSN: 1664-462X
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in Plant Science, 01 November 2017, Vol.8
    Description: Yam (Dioscorea spp.) is a tuber crop grown for food security, income generation, and traditional medicine. This crop has a high cultural value for some of the groups growing it. Most of the production comes from West Africa where the increased demand has been covered by enlarging cultivated surfaces while the mean yield remained around 10 t tuber ha−1. In West Africa, yam is traditionally cultivated without input as the first crop after a long-term fallow as it is considered to require a high soil fertility. African soils, however, are being more and more degraded. The aims of this review were to show the importance of soil fertility for yam, discuss barriers that might limit the adoption of integrated soil fertility management (ISFM) in yam-based systems in West Africa, present the concept of innovation platforms (IPs) as a tool to foster collaboration between actors for designing innovations in yam-based systems and provide recommendations for future research. This review shows that the development of sustainable, feasible, and acceptable soil management innovations for yam requires research to be conducted in interdisciplinary teams including natural and social sciences and in a transdisciplinary manner involving relevant actors from the problem definition, to the co-design of soil management innovations, the evaluation of research results, their communication and their implementation. Finally, this research should be conducted in diverse biophysical and socio-economic settings to develop generic rules on soil/plant relationships in yam as affected by soil management and on how to adjust the innovation supply to specific contexts.
    Keywords: Dioscorea Spp ; Soil Fertility ; Interdisciplinarity ; Transdisciplinarity ; Innovation Platforms ; Botany
    E-ISSN: 1664-462X
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in Plant Science, June 6, 2019
    Description: Decreasing phosphorus (P) concentrations in leaves of beech ( Fagus sylvatica L.) across Europe raise the question about the implications for forest health. Considering the distribution of beech forests on soils encompassing a broad range of nutrient availability, we hypothesized that this tree species exhibits high phenotypic plasticity allowing it to alter mass, and nutrient allocation in response to local nutrient availability. To test this, we grew two groups of 12–15 year old beech saplings originating from sites with high and low soil P availability for 2 years in mineral soil from their own site and in soil from the other site. After two growing seasons, P concentrations in leaves and stem, as well as mass allocation to leaves and fine roots were affected by both soil and plant origin. By contrast, relative P allocation to leaves and fine roots, as well as P concentrations in fine roots, were determined almost entirely by the experimental soil. Independent of the P nutritional status defined as average concentration of P in the whole plant, which still clearly reflected the soil conditions at the site of plant origin, relative P allocation to leaves was a particularly good indicator of P availability in the experimental soil. Furthermore, a high plasticity of this plant trait was indicated by a large difference between plants growing in the two experimental soils. This suggests a strong ability of beech to alter resource allocation in response to specific soil conditions.
    Keywords: Soil Phosphorus
    ISSN: 1664-462X
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in Plant Science, 01 November 2019, Vol.10
    Description: Organic fertilizer applications can contribute to Zinc (Zn) biofortification of crops. An enriched stable isotope source tracing approach is a central tool to further determine the potential of this biofortification measure. Here, we assessed the use of the widely available quadrupole single-collector...
    Keywords: Zinc ; Stable Isotopes ; Isotope Dilution ; Labelling ; Soil ; Organic Fertilizer ; Botany
    E-ISSN: 1664-462X
    Source: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
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