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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    In: Global Change Biology, January 2018, Vol.24(1), pp.e183-e189
    Description: Current climate and land‐use changes affect regional and global cycles of silicon (Si), with yet uncertain consequences for ecosystems. The key role of Si in marine ecology by controlling algae growth is well recognized but research on terrestrial ecosystems neglected Si since not considered an essential plant nutrient. However, grasses and various other plants accumulate large amounts of Si, and recently it has been hypothesized that incorporation of Si as a structural plant component may substitute for the energetically more expensive biosynthesis of lignin. Herein, we provide evidence supporting this hypothesis. We demonstrate that in straw of rice () deriving from a large geographic gradient across South‐East Asia, the Si concentrations (ranging from 1.6% to 10.7%) are negatively related to the concentrations of carbon (31.3% to 42.5%) and lignin‐derived phenols (32 to 102 mg/g carbon). Less lignin may explain results of previous studies that Si‐rich straw decomposes faster. Hence, Si seems a significant but hardly recognized factor in organic carbon cycling through grasslands and other ecosystems dominated by Si‐accumulating plants. The key role of silicon in marine ecology by controlling algae growth is well recognized but research on terrestrial ecosystems neglected Si since not considered an essential plant nutrient. However, many plants accumulate large amounts of Si, and recently it has been hypothesized that incorporation of Si as a structural component may substitute for the energetically more expensive biosynthesis of lignin. Herein, we provide evidence supporting this hypothesis. We demonstrate that in rice straw deriving from a large geographic gradient across South‐East Asia, the Si concentrations are negatively related to the concentrations of carbon and lignin‐derived phenols. Our data offer an explanation for previous findings of faster decomposition of Si‐rich rice straw as lignin regulates plant litter decomposition rates. Hence, Si seems a significant but hardly recognized factor in carbon cycling through ecosystems dominated by grass species and/or other Si‐accumulating plants.
    Keywords: Carbon Cycle ; Lignin ; Litter Decomposition ; Rice ; Silicon ; Structural Plant Components
    ISSN: 1354-1013
    E-ISSN: 1365-2486
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  • 2
    In: Global Change Biology, April 2013, Vol.19(4), pp.1107-1113
    Description: More than 50% of the world's population feeds on rice. Soils used for rice production are mostly managed under submerged conditions (paddy soils). This management, which favors carbon sequestration, potentially decouples surface from subsurface carbon cycling. The objective of this study was to elucidate the long‐term rates of carbon accrual in surface and subsurface soil horizons relative to those of soils under nonpaddy management. We assessed changes in total soil organic as well as of inorganic carbon stocks along a 2000‐year chronosequence of soils under paddy and adjacent nonpaddy management in the angtze delta, hina. The initial organic carbon accumulation phase lasts much longer and is more intensive than previously assumed, e.g., by the ntergovernmental anel on limate hange (). Paddy topsoils accumulated 170–178 kg organic carbon ha a in the first 300 years; subsoils lost 29–84 kg organic carbon ha a during this period of time. Subsoil carbon losses were largest during the first 50 years after land embankment and again large beyond 700 years of cultivation, due to inorganic carbonate weathering and the lack of organic carbon replenishment. Carbon losses in subsoils may therefore offset soil carbon gains or losses in the surface soils. We strongly recommend including subsoils into global carbon accounting schemes, particularly for paddy fields.
    Keywords: Carbon Sequestration ; Inorganic Carbon ; Land Use ; Organic Carbon ; Paddy ; Rice Cultivation ; Soils ; Subsoils
    ISSN: 1354-1013
    E-ISSN: 1365-2486
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