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  • 1
    In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, August 2015, Vol.45(8), pp.437-450
    Description: We propose that a focus on new money increases forgiveness of others. Three studies provided consistent support for our hypothesis. Working adults recalled an interpersonal offense by a colleague and were subsequently induced to think of either new or used banknotes. Thinking of new (vs. used) banknotes led to weaker destructive tendencies toward the offender (Study 1), more pro‐relationship thinking (Study 2), and higher forgiveness (Study 3). This effect was mediated by feelings of vitality (Study 3), indicating a strength‐based mechanism. We discuss implications for research on money, forgiveness, self‐regulation, and organizational behavior.
    Keywords: Organizational Behavior ; Forgiveness ; Social Psychology;
    ISSN: 0021-9029
    E-ISSN: 1559-1816
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: JOURNAL OF APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, 2013
    Description: This study examined the impact of motivational underpinnings of volunteerism on self-reported volunteer behaviors and satisfaction. Data from 153 volunteers in youth organizations supported a two-dimensional structure of self- and other-oriented motives. Self-oriented motives were more important in explaining in-role volunteer behavior, while other-oriented concerns were also important in predicting extra-role volunteer behavior and satisfaction. These findings are discussed in the context of a functional approach to volunteerism and linked to recent findings regarding the role of self-and other-oriented motives from the organizational literature. Suggestions for recruiting and motivating young volunteers in youth development organizations are presented.
    Keywords: Social Sciences ; Functional-Approach ; Citizenship Behavior ; Job-Performance ; Role-Identity ; Community Involvement ; Prosocial Behavior ; Motivations ; Satisfaction ; Determinants ; Metaanalysis
    ISSN: 0021-9029
    E-ISSN: 15591816
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  • 3
    In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, July 2012, Vol.42(7), pp.1675-1693
    Description: An experimental study investigated the role of sanctioning systems in shaping individual contributions in step‐level public good dilemmas. It was predicted and found that procedural justice of the sanctioning system (i.e., accurate vs. inaccurate evaluations of contributions) influenced contributions. Specifically, when group members identified strongly with the group, procedural justice exerted influence only when the group failed in establishing the public good. In contrast, when group members did not identify strongly with the group, procedural justice of the sanction only exerted influence if the group succeeded. These findings suggest that integrating the social dilemma and procedural justice literature may be beneficial for understanding the conditions that determine the effectiveness of sanctioning systems.
    Keywords: Public Good ; Studies ; Sanctions ; Experimental/Theoretical;
    ISSN: 0021-9029
    E-ISSN: 1559-1816
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  • 4
    In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, May 2002, Vol.32(5), pp.997-1016
    Description: The present experiment examined whether leaders high in charisma are able to motivate decision‐makers to cooperate more in a public goods dilemma. On the basis of charismatic leadership theories, it was expected that a charismatic leader would be able to transform people's motives beyond self‐interest, consequently increasing cooperation. This transformation effect was expected to occur among individuals aimed at maximizing their own self‐interest (i.e., pro‐selfs), but not among those aimed at maximizing joint or collective outcomes (i.e., pro‐socials). Furthermore, leader's charisma was experimentally manipulated by means of describing the leader as either self‐sacrificing or benefiting. The results revealed that self‐sacrificing leaders, contrary to benefiting leaders, were perceived as more charismatic and were able to motivate decision‐makers to cooperate more. The latter effect appeared to be more pronounced among pro‐selfs rather than pro‐socials, as such supporting the transformational idea of charismatic leaders. Further results showed that this behavioral effect was mediated by perceptions of legitimacy. The meaning and conception of charismatic leadership in decision‐making situations are discussed by using insights from the social dilemma and charismatic leadership literature.
    Keywords: Social Psychology -- Research ; Charisma (Psychology) -- Analysis ; Self Sacrifice -- Social Aspects;
    ISSN: 0021-9029
    E-ISSN: 1559-1816
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  • 5
    In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, October 2008, Vol.38(10), pp.2518-2549
    Description: The present research examines how emotions of a third party interacting with an authority who has treated him or her unfairly affect one's feelings of anger toward the authority as a function of the ambiguity of the unfair treatment. Across a scenario and a laboratory study, it was found that when participants did not receive voice and it was unclear whether this was the result of an authority's unfair intentions, participants were less angry when the third party expressed shame, rather than anger, toward the same enacting authority. A second laboratory study replicated this effect, but now by showing that one's feelings of anger (in the case of ambiguity) were lower when the other person expressed guilt, relative to anger.
    Keywords: Laboratories ; Anger;
    ISSN: 0021-9029
    E-ISSN: 1559-1816
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  • 6
    In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, August 2007, Vol.37(8), pp.1797-1816
    Description: In 2 studies, we attempted to make a first step toward integrating the literature on transformational leadership and organizational justice. We examined the extent to which justice affects perceptions of transformational leadership. We predicted that especially interactional justice should have strong effects. Study 1 was a vignette study ( = 100) in which distributive, procedural, and interactional justice were manipulated orthogonally. As expected, only interactional justice affected transformational leadership perceptions. Study 2 replicated these results in an organizational field study ( = 257). Distributive and procedural justice affected perceptions of transformational leadership, but when interactional justice was entered in the regression equation, their effects disappeared. Implications for integrating the literature on transformational leadership and organizational justice are discussed.
    Keywords: Social-Exchange ; Transactional Leadership ; Procedural Justice ; Interactional Justice ; Work Outcomes ; Fairness ; Self ; Workplace ; Inequity ; Model;
    ISSN: 0021-9029
    E-ISSN: 1559-1816
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  • 7
    In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, June 2007, Vol.37(6), pp.1385-1404
    Description: The present research examined the effect of distributive justice and autocratic leadership style on followers' negative emotions. It was predicted that distributive justice would influence followers' negative emotions if the leader did not adopt an autocratic leadership style (i.e., not being pushy in the process leading to the decision). Results from a scenario experiment and an organizational survey indeed showed that distributive justice and autocratic leadership style interacted to influence followers' negative emotions such that the relationship between distributive justice and negative emotions was significant when the leadership style was low in autocratic behavior. Implications in terms of integrating the leadership and justice literature are discussed.
    Keywords: Leadership ; Emotions ; Autocracy ; Distributive Justice;
    ISSN: 0021-9029
    E-ISSN: 1559-1816
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  • 8
    In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, June 2008, Vol.38(6), pp.1562-1579
    Description: Prior studies of the effect of group identification on cooperation in social dilemmas have advanced 2 competing accounts: the goal‐transformation hypothesis, which holds that identification makes personal and collective goals interchangeable; and the goal‐amplification hypothesis, which states that identification induces positive expectations about others’ cooperative behavior. However, prior studies have neglected to assess the process measures necessary to pit the one account against the other. The present study showed that the effect of identification was moderated by participants’ social value orientation. Identification influenced proselfs’ cooperation more than prosocials’ cooperation. Mediational analyses further showed that the effect of our identification manipulation was mediated by participants’ sense of collective self, and not by their expectations.
    Keywords: Sociology & Social History;
    ISSN: 0021-9029
    E-ISSN: 1559-1816
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  • 9
    In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, January 2008, Vol.38(1), pp.173-197
    Description: The present study ( = 200) investigated participants’ attributions for explaining the behavior of noncooperative and cooperative targets in a commons and anticommons dilemma. The attribution dimensions of concern for others, fear, (low levels of) greed, and efficiency were highly related and were interpreted to reflect prosocial orientation. Cooperative targets were judged as more prosocial, but these differences were more pronounced in the commons than in the anticommons dilemma. Crossover interaction effects were obtained for ignorance and fear, revealing higher attribution scores for the noncooperative target in the commons dilemma and the cooperative target in the anticommons dilemma. It is argued that commons and anticommons dilemmas constitute different frames of reference for judging cooperative behavior.
    ISSN: 0021-9029
    E-ISSN: 1559-1816
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 2007, Vol.37(6), pp.1797-1816
    ISSN: 0021-9029
    Source: NARCIS (National Academic Research and Collaborations Information System)
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