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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Gene Medicine, March 2001, Vol.3(2), pp.115-124
    Description: BACKGROUNDGene transfer efficiency drops significantly when polarized mammary epithelial cells are transfected instead of actively growing cells. However, fully differentiated cells are the targets for gene transfer in many in vivo applications. Therefore, a simple and effective method for the transfection of polarized mammary epithelial cells in confluent monolayers was developed. METHODSReporter gene plasmids were complexed with polyethylenimine with an average molecular weight of 25 kDa (PEI 25), or other agents, to transfect confluent monolayers of ovine mammary epithelial cells (OMEC II) or human carcinoma cells (CaCo-2) in vitro. The improved technique included pretreatment of the cells with a hyperosmotic mannitol solution (7%) which caused a loosening of the tight contacts between the cells. Alternatively, the mannitol shock could be replaced by a short treatment with trypsin or EDTA. In addition to the pretreatment, 12.5% polyethyleneglycol with an average molecular weight of 8000 kDa (PEG 8000) was included in the transfection mixture containing the DNA complexes. RESULTSThe combined application of mannitol and PEG resulted in a very reliable 5- to 30-fold increase in reporter gene expression in OMEC II and CaCo-2 cells, but not K562 cells (an example of another cell type). The improved technique can also be combined with other polymer-based transfection agents. The transfection rate was enhanced for confluent monolayer cells with fully developed epithelial polarity but also for subconfluent, growing epithelial cell cultures. CONCLUSIONSA novel transfection protocol for epithelial cells is presented. The combined treatment of cells with mannitol and polyethyleneglycol results in substantial enhancement of in vitro transfection of epithelial cell lines.
    Keywords: Gene Transfer ; Polyethylenimine ; Confluent Monolayer ; Osmotic Shock ; Polyethyleneglycol ; Epithelial Cells
    ISSN: 1099-498X
    E-ISSN: 1521-2254
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Gene Medicine, March 1999, Vol.1(2), pp.111-120
    Description: BACKGROUND: Efficient and target-specific in vivo gene delivery is a major challenge in gene therapy. Compared to cell culture application, in vivo gene delivery faces a variety of additional obstacles such as anatomical size constraints, interactions with biological fluids and extracellular matrix, and binding to a broad variety of non-target cell types.METHODS: Polycation-based vectors, including adenovirus-enhanced transferrinfection (AVET) and transferrin-polyethylenimine (Tf-PEI), were tested for gene delivery into subcutaneously growing tumors after local and systemic application. DNA biodistribution and reporter gene expression was measured in the major organs and in the tumor.RESULTS: Gene transfer after intratumoral application was 10-100 fold more efficient with Tf-PEI/DNA or AVET complexes in comparison to naked DNA. Targeted gene delivery into subcutaneously growing tumors after systemic application was achieved using electroneutral AVET complexes and sterically stabilized PEGylated Tf-PEI/DNA complexes, whereas application of positively charged polycation/DNA complexes resulted in predominant gene expression in the lungs and was associated by considerable toxicity.CONCLUSION: For systemic application, the physical and colloidal parameters of the transfection complexes, such as particle size, stability, and surface charge, determine DNA biodistribution, toxicity, and transfection efficacy. By controlling these parameters, DNA biodistribution and gene expression can be targeted to different organs.
    Keywords: Gene Therapy ; Tumor Targeting ; Polyethylenimine ; Gene Transfer
    ISSN: 1099-498X
    E-ISSN: 1521-2254
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
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