Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, August 2017, Vol.180(4), pp.491-495
    Description: Birnessite is a highly reactive manganese oxide and common in soil. We checked the attachment of birnessite, synthesized by the reduction of permanganate by lactate, on sand‐sized quartz to produce birnessite‐coated sand (BCS). Attachment and aggregation of birnessite increased with pH and reaction time. The extent of Cu and Zn adsorption to BCS was similar to that of birnessites in previous studies. Based on these results and the stability of this BCS, it may be used in water treatment.
    Keywords: Manganese Oxide ; Metal Adsorption ; Permanganate Reduction ; Water Treatment
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, August 2013, Vol.176(4), pp.497-499
    Description: Avoiding chemical and physical artifacts during sampling is crucial for realistic analyses of mineral and other colloids in soil. We developed a sampler, which allows for the collection of Fe oxides that precipitate in their natural environment in a Bg horizon of a Calcaric Gleysol. Simultaneous measurements of redox‐sensitive parameters confirmed temporal changes from Fe‐reducing to Fe‐oxidizing conditions on site.
    Keywords: Sampling ; Fe Oxides ; Redoximorphic Soil ; Gleysol
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, October 2011, Vol.174(5), pp.721-731
    Description: A flue dust originaly enriched in metal sulfides evolved as a by‐product of Cu smelting. The dust was deposited as slurry in unsealed heaps. It is characterized by very high contents of toxic metals such as Pb and Zn. The slurry is a source of soil, sediment, and water contamination. We studied a Technosol profile developed from deposited flue‐dust slurry by means of chemical and mineralogical characterization (SEM‐EDX, XRD, FTIR, DTA‐MS, XRF, Pb isotopes), by open‐flow and closed‐flow column experiments on contaminant release under water‐saturated conditions, and by geochemical modeling to evaluate release processes and to quantify aqueous contaminant concentrations. Besides ash particles and quartz, the flue‐dust slurry contains Fe oxides, silicates, sulfates, and sulfides (in varying states of weathering). In both column approaches, metal concentrations exceed inspection values. The concentration patterns in both experimental column approaches indicate near‐equilibrium mineral dissolution. Geochemical modeling reveals partial dissolution of sulfates and precipitation of secondary carbonates. Their precipitation prevents complete sulfate dissolution, which would have led to even higher aqueous metal concentrations and contaminant export. The combination of detailed material characterization, column experiments, and modeling allows for quantitative and qualitative estimation of contaminant release into the soil solution.
    Keywords: Soil Contamination ; Weathering ; Modeling ; Source Characterization ; Contaminant Export
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, August 2013, Vol.176(4), pp.509-519
    Description: Dolomite (CaMg(CO)) constitutes half of the global carbonates. Thus, many calcareous soils have been developing rather from dolomitic rocks than from calcite (CaCO)‐dominated limestone. We developed a physical fractionation procedure based on three fractionation steps, using sonication with subsequent density fractionation to separate soil organic matter (SOM) from dolomite‐derived soil constituents. The method avoids acidic pretreatment for destruction of carbonates but aims at separating out carbonate minerals according to density. The fractionation was tested on three soils developed on dolostone parent material (alluvial gravel and solid rock), differing in organic‐C (OC) and inorganic‐C (IC) concentrations and degree of carbonate weathering. Soil samples were suspended and centrifuged in Na‐polytungstate (SPT) solutions of increasing density, resulting in five different fractions: two light fractions 20 μm and 2.6 g cm) was dominated by dolomite (85%–95%). The density separation yielded fractions differing in mineral compositions, as well as in SOM, indicated by soil‐type‐specific OC distributions and decreasing OC : N ratios with increasing density of fractions. The presented method is applicable to a wide range of dolomitic and most likely to all other calcareous soils.
    Keywords: Carbonates ; Sodium Polytungstate ; Carbon ; Iron Oxides ; Sonication
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, February 2010, Vol.173(1), pp.88-99
    Description: Soil, the “Earth's thin skin” serves as the delicate interface between the biosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and lithosphere. It is a dynamic and hierarchically organized system of various organic and inorganic constituents and organisms, the spatial structure of which defines a large, complex, and heterogeneous interface. Biogeochemical processes at soil interfaces are fundamental for the overall soil development, and they are the primary driving force for key ecosystem functions such as plant productivity and water quality. Ultimately, these processes control the fate and transport of contaminants and nutrients into the vadose zone and as such their biogeochemical cycling. The definite objective in biogeochemical‐interface research is to gain a mechanistic understanding of the architecture of these biogeochemical interfaces in soils and of the complex interplay and interdependencies of the physical, chemical, and biological processes acting at and within these dynamic interfaces in soil. The major challenges are (1) to identify the factors controlling the architecture of biogeochemical interfaces, (2) to link the processes operative at the individual molecular and/or organism scale to the phenomena active at the aggregate scale in a mechanistic way, and (3) to explain the behavior of organic chemicals in soil within a general mechanistic framework. To put this in action, integration of soil physical, chemical, and biological disciplines is mandatory. Indispensably, it requires the adaption and development of characterization and probing techniques adapted from the neighboring fields of molecular biology, analytical and computational chemistry as well as materials and nano‐sciences. To shape this field of fundamental soil research, the German Research Foundation (DFG) has granted the Priority Program “Biogeochemical Interfaces in Soil”, in which 22 individual research projects are involved.
    Keywords: Soil Function ; Soil Architecture ; Spectro‐Microscopy ; Tomography ; Som ; Soil Microbial Ecology ; Organic Chemicals
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, December 2018, Vol.181(6), pp.894-904
    Description: Sonication is widely used for disruption of suspended soil aggregates. Calorimetric calibration allows for determining sonication power and applied energy as a measure for aggregate disrupting forces. Yet other properties of sonication devices (., oscillation frequency and amplitude, sonotrode diameter) as well as procedure details (soil‐to‐water ratio, size, shape, and volume of used containers) may influence the extent of aggregate disruption in addition to the applied energy. In this study, we tested potential bias in aggregate disruption when different devices or procedures are used in laboratory routines. In nine laboratories, three reference soil samples were sonicated at 30 J mL and 400 J mL. Aggregate disruption was estimated based on particle size distribution before and after sonication. Size distribution was obtained by standardized submerged sieving for particle size classes 2000–200 and 200–63 µm, and by dynamic imaging for particles 45 W). Thus, these sonication device properties need to be listed when reporting on sonication‐based soil aggregate disruption. The overall small differences in the degree of disruption of soil aggregates between different laboratories demonstrate that sonication with the energies tested (30 and 400 J mL) provides replicable results despite the variations regarding procedures and equipment.
    Keywords: Disaggregation ; Particle Size Fractions ; Reproducibility ; Round‐Robin Test ; Ultrasound
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, June 2006, Vol.169(3), pp.335-340
    Description: Ferricyanide, [Fe(CN)], is an anthropogenic and potentially toxic contaminant in soil. Its adsorption on goethite has been previously studied, but not evaluated with a surface complexation model (SCM) considering the effects of pH and ionic strength. Therefore, we carried out batch experiments with ferricyanide and goethite suspensions with different ferricyanide concentrations (0.075 mM and 0.15 mM), ionic strengths (0.01 and 0.1 M), and pH (ranging from 4 to 7.4). Adsorption data were then interpreted with the 1‐p Stern and the charge distribution model assuming monodentate inner‐sphere ferricyanide surface complexes on goethite (lg = 10.6), which are known from infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, we applied the SCM to ferricyanide adsorption in previous studies on ferricyanide adsorption in the presence of sulfate and on the solubility of Fe‐cyanide complexes in a suspension of a loess loam. The SCM correctly reflected ferricyanide adsorption in the batch experiments as well as the effects of pH and ionic strength. The SCM also described ferricyanide adsorption in the presence of sulfate, because the ferricyanide adsorption measured and that modeled were significantly correlated ( = 0.80). Furthermore, we applied the SCM to a study on the solubility of Fe‐cyanide complexes in soil under varying redox conditions so that ferricyanide adsorption on goethite and precipitation of Fe‐cyanide complexes were considered. The actual ferricyanide concentrations were rather reflected when applying the SCM compared to those modeled in an approach in which exclusively precipitation was taken into account. We conclude that ferricyanide adsorption on goethite should be included into geochemical modeling approaches on the mobility of Fe‐cyanide complexes in subsoils.
    Keywords: Ferricyanide ; Goethite ; Adsorption ; Surface Complexation Modeling ; Adsorption Mechanism
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, December 2001, Vol.164(6), pp.651-655
    Description: The sorption of the iron‐cyanide complexes ferricyanide, [Fe(CN)], and ferrocyanide, [Fe(CN)], on ferrihydrite was investigated in batch experiments including the effects of pH (pH 3.5 to 8) and ionic strength (0.001 to 0.1 M). The pH‐dependent sorption data were evaluated with a model approach by (1999): c = exp(bS)S/(S‐S), where c is the solution concentration; S is the sorbed amount; S is maximum sorption; b is a parameter; and is a parameter at constant pH. Ferricyanide sorption was negatively affected by increasing ionic strength, ferrocyanide sorption not at all. More ferricyanide than ferrocyanide was sorbed in the acidic range. In the neutral range the opposite was true. Fitting the pH‐dependent sorption to the model resulted in a strong correlation for both iron‐cyanide complexes with a common sorption maximum of 1.6 μmol m. Only little negative charge was conveyed to the ferrihydrite surface by sorption of iron‐cyanide complexes. The sorption of iron‐cyanide complexes on ferrihydrite is weaker than that on goethite, as a comparison of the model calculations shows. This may be caused by the lower relative amount of high‐affinity sites present on the ferrihydrite surface. Einfache Modellierung der Sorption von Eisencyankomplexen an Ferrihydrit Die Sorption des Eisencyan(III)komplexes, [Fe(CN)], und des Eisencyan(II)komplexes, [Fe(CN)], an Ferrihydrit wurde in Schüttelversuchen in Abhängigkeit vom pH‐Wert (3,5 bis 8) und von der Ionenstärke (0,001 bis 0,1 M) untersucht. Die Auswertung der pH‐abhängigen Sorption erfolgte nach einem Modellansatz von (1999): c = exp(bS)S/(S‐S), wobei c die Lösungskonzentration, S die sorbierte Menge, S die Maximalsorption, b ein Parameter und ein Parameter bei konstantem pH ist. Nur die Sorption des Eisencyan(III)komplexes wurde negativ durch die Erhöhung der Ionenstärke beeinflusst, die des Eisencyan(II)komplexes nicht. Der Eisencyan(III)komplex wurde im Sauren in höherem Maße als der Eisencyan(II)komplex gebunden, im Neutralen war das Gegenteil der Fall. Die Anpassung der pH‐abhängigen Sorption beider Eisencyankomplexe an das Modell zeigte einen engen Zusammenhang mit einem gemeinsamen Sorptionsmaximum von 1,6 μmol m. Durch die Sorption von Eisencyankomplexen wurde nur wenig negative Ladung auf die Ferrihydritoberfläche übertragen. Ein Vergleich der Modellierungen an Ferrihydrit und Goethit zeigt, dass die Eisencyankomplexe an Ferrihydrit schwächer gebunden werden. Dies kann mit einem geringeren relativen Anteil von Sorptionsplätzen mit hoher Affinität begründet werden.
    Keywords: Sorption ; Iron‐Cyanide Complexes ; Ferrihydrite ; Goethite ; Ph ; Ionic Strength
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, April 2003, Vol.166(2), pp.204-209
    Description: Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soils is partially adsorbed when passing through a soil profile. In most adsorption studies, water soluble organic matter extracted by water or dilute salt solutions is used instead of real DOM gained by lysimeters or ceramic suction cups. We investigated the adsorption of DOM gained from three compartments (forest floor leachate and soil solution from 20 cm (Bg horizon) and 60 cm depth (2Bg horizon)) on the corresponding clay and fine silt fractions ( Bg 〉 2Bg. Dissolved organic matter in the 2Bg horizon can be regarded as slightly reactive, because adsorption was low. Desorption of DOM from the subsoil samples was reflected more realistically with a non‐linear regression approach than with initial mass isotherms. The results show that the extent of DOM adsorption especially in subsoils is controlled by the composition and by the origin of the DOM used as adsorptive rather than by the mineralogical composition of the soil or by contents of soil organic matter. We recommend to use DOM gained when investigating the fate of DOM in subsoils. Adsorption “wirklich” gelöster organischer Substanz an die Ton‐ und Feinschluff‐Fraktionen eines Pseudogleys unter Wald Die gelöste organische Substanz (DOM) in Böden unterliegt bei der Passage eines Bodenprofils Adsorptionsprozessen. In den meisten Adsorptionsstudien wurde wasserlösliche organische Substanz, die mit Wasser oder einer verdünnten Salzlösung extrahiert wurde, anstelle von realer, mit Lysimetern oder keramischen Saugkerzen gewonnener DOM benutzt. Wir untersuchten die Adsorption von in drei Kompartimenten gewonnener DOM (Auflagenperkolat und Bodenlösung aus 20 cm (Sw‐Horizont) und 60 cm Tiefe (IISd‐Horizont)) an die korrespondierenden Ton‐ und Feinschluff‐Fraktionen ( Sw 〉 IISd ab. Gelöste organische Substanz im IISd‐Horizont kann als schwach reaktiv angesehen werden, da die Adsorption gering war. Die Desorption von DOM aus Unterbodenproben wurde von einem nicht‐linearen Regressionsansatz realistischer wieder gegeben als mit der Initial‐mass‐Isotherme. Adsorption und Desorption von Sulfat und Fluorid weisen auf unterschiedliche Adsorptionsprozesse in den jeweiligen Horizonten hin. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass die Zusammensetzung und die Herkunft der als Adsorptiv benutzten DOM das Ausmaß der DOM‐Adsorption insbesondere in Unterböden steuert, weniger die mineralogische Zusammensetzung des Bodens oder die Gehalte an organischer Bodensubstanz. Bei Untersuchungen zum Verbleib von DOM in Unterböden empfehlen wir die Verwendung von gewonnener DOM.
    Keywords: Stagnic Gleysol ; Dissolved Organic Matter ; Adsorption ; Clay Fraction ; Fine Silt Fraction
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, August 2009, Vol.172(4), pp.464-466
    Description: NO ABSTRACT ; Includes references ; p. 464-466.
    Keywords: Trace Elements ; Ocher ; Contaminant Release ; Column Experiment
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages