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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Microbial ecology, 2015, Vol.70(3), pp.809-818
    Description: Many studies have assessed the responses of soil microbial functional groups to increases in atmospheric CO₂ or N deposition alone and more rarely in combination. However, the effects of elevated CO₂ and N on the (de)coupling between different microbial functional groups (e.g., different groups of nitrifiers) have been barely studied, despite potential consequences for ecosystem functioning. Here, we investigated the short-term combined effects of elevated CO₂ and N supply on the abundances of the four main microbial groups involved in soil nitrification: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (belonging to the genera Nitrobacter and Nitrospira) in grassland mesocosms. AOB and AOA abundances responded differently to the treatments: N addition increased AOB abundance, but did not alter AOA abundance. Nitrobacter and Nitrospira abundances also showed contrasted responses to the treatments: N addition increased Nitrobacter abundance, but decreased Nitrospira abundance. Our results support the idea of a niche differentiation between AOB and AOA, and between Nitrobacter and Nitrospira. AOB and Nitrobacter were both promoted at high N and C conditions (and low soil water content for Nitrobacter), while AOA and Nitrospira were favored at low N and C conditions (and high soil water content for Nitrospira). In addition, Nitrobacter abundance was positively correlated to AOB abundance and Nitrospira abundance to AOA abundance. Our results suggest that the couplings between ammonia and nitrite oxidizers are influenced by soil N availability. Multiple environmental changes may thus elicit rapid and contrasted responses between and among the soil ammonia and nitrite oxidizers due to their different ecological requirements. ; p. 809-818.
    Keywords: Soil Water Content ; Nitrospira ; Ammonia ; Ecosystems ; Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria ; Carbon Dioxide ; Nitrogen ; Oxidants ; Soil Water ; Nitrification ; Grasslands ; Nitrobacter ; Nitrites
    ISSN: 0095-3628
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Microbial Ecology, 2015, Vol.70(3), pp.809-818
    Description: Many studies have assessed the responses of soil microbial functional groups to increases in atmospheric CO 2 or N deposition alone and more rarely in combination. However, the effects of elevated CO 2 and N on the (de)coupling between different microbial functional groups (e.g., different groups of nitrifiers) have been barely studied, despite potential consequences for ecosystem functioning. Here, we investigated the short-term combined effects of elevated CO 2 and N supply on the abundances of the four main microbial groups involved in soil nitrification: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (belonging to the genera Nitrobacter and Nitrospira ) in grassland mesocosms. AOB and AOA abundances responded differently to the treatments: N addition increased AOB abundance, but did not alter AOA abundance. Nitrobacter and Nitrospira abundances also showed contrasted responses to the treatments: N addition increased Nitrobacter abundance, but decreased Nitrospira abundance. Our results support the idea of a niche differentiation between AOB and AOA, and between Nitrobacter and Nitrospira . AOB and Nitrobacter were both promoted at high N and C conditions (and low soil water content for Nitrobacter ), while AOA and Nitrospira were favored at low N and C conditions (and high soil water content for Nitrospira ). In addition, Nitrobacter abundance was positively correlated to AOB abundance and Nitrospira abundance to AOA abundance. Our results suggest that the couplings between ammonia and nitrite oxidizers are influenced by soil N availability. Multiple environmental changes may thus elicit rapid and contrasted responses between and among the soil ammonia and nitrite oxidizers due to their different ecological requirements.
    Keywords: Global change ; Grasslands ; Nitrification ; Ammonia oxidizers ; Nitrite oxidizers ; Niche differentiation
    ISSN: 0095-3628
    E-ISSN: 1432-184X
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Microbial Ecology, 2006, Vol.52(1), pp.151-158
    Description: Soils contain the greatest reservoir of biodiversity on Earth, and the functionality of the soil ecosystem sustains the rest of the terrestrial biosphere. This functionality results from complex interactions between biological and physical processes that are strongly modulated by the soil physical structure. Using a novel combination of biochemical and biophysical indicators and synchrotron microtomography, we have discovered that soil microbes and plant roots microengineer their habitats by changing the porosity and clustering properties (i.e., spatial correlation) of the soil pores. Our results indicate that biota act to significantly alter their habitat toward a more porous, ordered, and aggregated structure that has important consequences for functional properties, including transport processes. These observations support the hypothesis that the soil–plant–microbe complex is self-organized.
    Keywords: Ecosystems;
    ISSN: 0095-3628
    E-ISSN: 1432-184X
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