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  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 08 May 2018, Vol.115(19), pp.4951-4956
    Description: is a gene strongly associated with components of the phonological processing system in animal models and in multiple independent studies of populations and languages. We propose that it may also influence population-level variation in language component usage. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the evolution and worldwide distribution of the READ1 regulatory element within , and compared its distribution with variation in different language properties. The mutational history of READ1 was estimated by examining primate and archaic hominin sequences. This identified duplication and expansion events, which created a large number of polymorphic alleles based on internal repeat units (RU1 and RU2). Association of READ1 alleles was studied with respect to the numbers of consonants and vowels for languages in 43 human populations distributed across five continents. Using population-based approaches with multivariate ANCOVA and linear mixed effects analyses, we found that the RU1-1 allele group of READ1 is significantly associated with the number of consonants within languages independent of genetic relatedness, geographic proximity, and language family. We propose that allelic variation in READ1 helped create a subtle cognitive bias that was amplified by cultural transmission, and ultimately shaped consonant use by different populations over time.
    Keywords: Dcdc2 ; Read1 ; Genetics ; Language ; Phoneme ; Alleles ; Genetic Variation ; Language ; Response Elements ; Microtubule-Associated Proteins -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2012, Vol.109(10), pp.3985-3990
    Description: Visual cortical surface area varies two- to threefold between human individuals, is highly heritable, and has been correlated with visual acuity and visual perception. However, it is still largely unknown what specific genetic and environmental factors contribute to normal variation in the area of visual cortex. To identify SNPs associated with the proportional surface area of visual cortex, we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in two independent cohorts. We identified one SNP (rs6116869) that replicated in both cohorts and had genome-wide significant association (Pcombined = 3.2 x 10–8). Furthermore, a metaanalysis of imputed SNPs in this genomic region identified a more significantly associated SNP (rs238295; P = 6.5 x 10–9) that was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs6116869. These SNPs are located within 4 kb of the 5' UTR of GPCPD1, glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterase GDE1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which in humans, is more highly expressed in occipital cortex compared with the remainder of cortex than 99.9% of genes genome-wide. Based on these findings, we conclude that this common genetic variation contributes to the proportional area of human visual cortex. We suggest that identifying genes that contribute to normal cortical architecture provides a first step to understanding genetic mechanisms that underlie visual perception. ; p. 3985-3990.
    Keywords: Cortex ; Environmental Factors ; Linkage Disequilibrium ; Genetic Variation ; Single Nucleotide Polymorphism ; Genes ; Genomics ; Humans ; Saccharomyces Cerevisiae ; Surface Area
    ISSN: 0027-8424
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2012, Vol.109(49), pp.20089-20094
    Description: It is now recognized that a number of cognitive, behavioral, and mental health outcomes across the lifespan can be traced to fetal development. Although the direct mediation is unknown, the substantial variance in fetal growth, most commonly indexed by birth weight, may affect lifespan brain development. We investigated effects of normal variance in birth weight on MRI-derived measures of brain development in 628 healthy children, adolescents, and young adults in the large-scale multicenter Pediatric Imaging, Neurocognition, and Genetics study. This heterogeneous sample was recruited through geographically dispersed sites in the United States. The influence of birth weight on cortical thickness, surface area, and striatal and total brain volumes was investigated, controlling for variance in age, sex, household income, and genetic ancestry factors. Birth weight was found to exert robust positive effects on regional cortical surface area in multiple regions as well as total brain and caudate volumes. These effects were continuous across birth weight ranges and ages and were not confined to subsets of the sample. The findings show that (i) aspects of later child and adolescent brain development are influenced at birth and (ii) relatively small differences in birth weight across groups and conditions typically compared in neuropsychiatric research (e.g., Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, schizophrenia, and personality disorders) may influence group differences observed in brain parameters of interest at a later stage in life. These findings should serve to increase our attention to early influences. ; p. 20089-20094.
    Keywords: Ancestry ; Schizophrenia ; Personality Disorders ; Household Income ; Children ; Variance ; Humans ; Young Adults ; Mental Health ; Adolescents ; Birth Weight ; Cognition ; Fetal Development ; Longevity ; Brain ; Image Analysis ; Surface Area
    ISSN: 0027-8424
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2012, Vol.109(48), pp.19620-19625
    Description: Self-regulation refers to the ability to control behavior, cognition, and emotions, and self-regulation failure is related to a range of neuropsychiatric problems. It is poorly understood how structural maturation of the brain brings about the gradual improvement in self-regulation during childhood. In a large-scale multicenter effort, 735 children (4–21 y) underwent structural MRI for quantification of cortical thickness and surface area and diffusion tensor imaging for quantification of the quality of major fiber connections. Brain development was related to a standardized measure of cognitive control (the flanker task from the National Institutes of Health Toolbox), a critical component of self-regulation. Ability to inhibit responses and impose cognitive control increased rapidly during preteen years. Surface area of the anterior cingulate cortex accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in cognitive performance. This finding is intriguing, because characteristics of the anterior cingulum are shown to be related to impulse, attention, and executive problems in neurodevelopmental disorders, indicating a neural foundation for self-regulation abilities along a continuum from normality to pathology. The relationship was strongest in the younger children. Properties of large-fiber connections added to the picture by explaining additional variance in cognitive control. Although cognitive control was related to surface area of the anterior cingulate independently of basic processes of mental speed, the relationship between white matter quality and cognitive control could be fully accounted for by speed. The results underscore the need for integration of different aspects of brain maturation to understand the foundations of cognitive development. ; p. 19620-19625.
    Keywords: Cortex ; Cognitive Development ; Emotions ; National Institutes Of Health ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Children ; Variance ; Childhood ; Cognition ; Brain ; Image Analysis ; Surface Area
    ISSN: 0027-8424
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 24 June 2014, Vol.111(25), pp.9229-34
    Description: In the bone marrow, a population of memory T cells has been described that promotes efficient secondary immune responses and has been considered to be preactivated, owing to its expression of CD69 and CD25. Here we show that human bone marrow professional memory T cells are not activated but are resting in terms of proliferation, transcription, and mobility. They are in the G0 phase of the cell cycle, and their transcriptome is that of resting T cells. The repertoire of CD4(+) bone marrow memory T cells compared with CD4(+) memory T cells from the blood is significantly enriched for T cells specific for cytomegalovirus-pp65 (immunodominant protein), tetanus toxoid, measles, mumps, and rubella. It is not enriched for vaccinia virus and Candida albicans-MP65 (immunodominant protein), typical pathogens of skin and/or mucosa. CD4(+) memory T cells specific for measles are maintained nearly exclusively in the bone marrow. Thus, CD4(+) memory T cells from the bone marrow provide long-term memory for systemic pathogens.
    Keywords: Antigen-Specific Response ; Polyfunctional ; Short- and Long-Term Memory ; Antigens, CD -- Immunology ; Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte -- Immunology ; Bone Marrow Cells -- Immunology ; Cd4-Positive T-Lymphocytes -- Immunology ; Immunologic Memory -- Physiology ; Interleukin-2 Receptor Alpha Subunit -- Immunology ; Lectins, C-Type -- Immunology ; Resting Phase, Cell Cycle -- Immunology
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 27 November 2012, Vol.109(48), pp.19620-5
    Description: Self-regulation refers to the ability to control behavior, cognition, and emotions, and self-regulation failure is related to a range of neuropsychiatric problems. It is poorly understood how structural maturation of the brain brings about the gradual improvement in self-regulation during childhood. In a large-scale multicenter effort, 735 children (4-21 y) underwent structural MRI for quantification of cortical thickness and surface area and diffusion tensor imaging for quantification of the quality of major fiber connections. Brain development was related to a standardized measure of cognitive control (the flanker task from the National Institutes of Health Toolbox), a critical component of self-regulation. Ability to inhibit responses and impose cognitive control increased rapidly during preteen years. Surface area of the anterior cingulate cortex accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in cognitive performance. This finding is intriguing, because characteristics of the anterior cingulum are shown to be related to impulse, attention, and executive problems in neurodevelopmental disorders, indicating a neural foundation for self-regulation abilities along a continuum from normality to pathology. The relationship was strongest in the younger children. Properties of large-fiber connections added to the picture by explaining additional variance in cognitive control. Although cognitive control was related to surface area of the anterior cingulate independently of basic processes of mental speed, the relationship between white matter quality and cognitive control could be fully accounted for by speed. The results underscore the need for integration of different aspects of brain maturation to understand the foundations of cognitive development.
    Keywords: Brain -- Physiology
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 04 December 2012, Vol.109(49), pp.20089-94
    Description: It is now recognized that a number of cognitive, behavioral, and mental health outcomes across the lifespan can be traced to fetal development. Although the direct mediation is unknown, the substantial variance in fetal growth, most commonly indexed by birth weight, may affect lifespan brain development. We investigated effects of normal variance in birth weight on MRI-derived measures of brain development in 628 healthy children, adolescents, and young adults in the large-scale multicenter Pediatric Imaging, Neurocognition, and Genetics study. This heterogeneous sample was recruited through geographically dispersed sites in the United States. The influence of birth weight on cortical thickness, surface area, and striatal and total brain volumes was investigated, controlling for variance in age, sex, household income, and genetic ancestry factors. Birth weight was found to exert robust positive effects on regional cortical surface area in multiple regions as well as total brain and caudate volumes. These effects were continuous across birth weight ranges and ages and were not confined to subsets of the sample. The findings show that (i) aspects of later child and adolescent brain development are influenced at birth and (ii) relatively small differences in birth weight across groups and conditions typically compared in neuropsychiatric research (e.g., Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, schizophrenia, and personality disorders) may influence group differences observed in brain parameters of interest at a later stage in life. These findings should serve to increase our attention to early influences.
    Keywords: Birth Weight -- Physiology ; Brain -- Growth & Development ; Fetal Development -- Physiology
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 06 March 2012, Vol.109(10), pp.3985-90
    Description: Visual cortical surface area varies two- to threefold between human individuals, is highly heritable, and has been correlated with visual acuity and visual perception. However, it is still largely unknown what specific genetic and environmental factors contribute to normal variation in the area of visual cortex. To identify SNPs associated with the proportional surface area of visual cortex, we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in two independent cohorts. We identified one SNP (rs6116869) that replicated in both cohorts and had genome-wide significant association (P(combined) = 3.2 × 10(-8)). Furthermore, a metaanalysis of imputed SNPs in this genomic region identified a more significantly associated SNP (rs238295; P = 6.5 × 10(-9)) that was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs6116869. These SNPs are located within 4 kb of the 5' UTR of GPCPD1, glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterase GDE1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which in humans, is more highly expressed in occipital cortex compared with the remainder of cortex than 99.9% of genes genome-wide. Based on these findings, we conclude that this common genetic variation contributes to the proportional area of human visual cortex. We suggest that identifying genes that contribute to normal cortical architecture provides a first step to understanding genetic mechanisms that underlie visual perception.
    Keywords: Genetic Variation ; Phosphoric Diester Hydrolases -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 18 April 2017, Vol.114(16), pp.4105-4110
    Description: Wallacea, the zone of oceanic islands separating the continental regions of Southeast Asia and Australia, has yielded sparse evidence for the symbolic culture of early modern humans. Here we report evidence for symbolic activity 30,000-22,000 y ago at Leang Bulu Bettue, a cave and rock-shelter site on the Wallacean island of Sulawesi. We describe hitherto undocumented practices of personal ornamentation and portable art, alongside evidence for pigment processing and use in deposits that are the same age as dated rock art in the surrounding karst region. Previously, assemblages of multiple and diverse types of Pleistocene "symbolic" artifacts were entirely unknown from this region. The Leang Bulu Bettue assemblage provides insight into the complexity and diversification of modern human culture during a key period in the global dispersal of our species. It also shows that early inhabitants of Sulawesi fashioned ornaments from body parts of endemic animals, suggesting modern humans integrated exotic faunas and other novel resources into their symbolic world as they colonized the biogeographically unique regions southeast of continental Eurasia.
    Keywords: Pleistocene Art ; Pleistocene Symbolism ; Wallacea ; Cognition ; Personal Ornamentation ; Fossils ; Social Behavior ; Symbolism ; Art -- History
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 25 November 2003, Vol.100(24), pp.13952-7
    Description: Zn2+ is critical for the functional and structural integrity of cells and contributes to a number of important processes including gene expression. It has been shown that NO exogenously applied via NO donors resulting in nitrosative stress leads to cytoplasmic Zn2+ release from the zinc storing protein metallothionein (MT) and probably other proteins that complex Zn2+ via cysteine thiols. We show here that, in cytokine-activated murine aortic endothelial cells, NO derived from the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) induces a transient nuclear release of Zn2+. This nuclear Zn2+ release depends on the presence of MT as shown by the lack of this effect in activated endothelial cells from MT-deficient mice and temporally correlates with nuclear MT translocation. Data also show that NO is an essential but not sufficient signal for MT-mediated Zn2+ trafficking from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. In addition, we found that, endogenously via iNOS, synthesized NO increases the constitutive mRNA expression of both MT-1 and MT-2 genes and that nitrosative stress exogenously applied via an NO donor increases constitutive MT mRNA expression via intracellular Zn2+ release. In conclusion, we here provide evidence for a signaling mechanism based on iNOS-derived NO through the regulation of intracellular Zn2+ trafficking and homeostasis.
    Keywords: Metallothionein -- Metabolism ; Nitric Oxide -- Metabolism ; Nitric Oxide Synthase -- Metabolism ; Zinc -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 0027-8424
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