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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Zoo biology, 2012, Vol.31(1), pp.107-20
    Description: Genetic tools have become a critical complement to traditional approaches for meeting short- and long-term goals of ex situ conservation programs. The San Diego Zoo (SDZ) harbors a collection of wild-born and captive-born Galápagos giant tortoises (n = 22) of uncertain species designation and unknown genealogical relationships. Here, we used mitochondrial DNA haplotypic data and nuclear microsatellite genotypic data to identify the evolutionary lineage of wild-born and captive-born tortoises of unknown ancestry, to infer levels of relatedness among founders and captive-born tortoises, and assess putative pedigree relationships assigned by the SDZ studbook. Assignment tests revealed that 12 wild-born and five captive-born tortoises represent five different species from Isabela Island and one species from Santa Cruz Island, only five of which were consistent with current studbook designations. Three wild-born and one captive-born tortoise were of mixed ancestry. In addition, kinship analyses revealed two significant first-order relationship pairs between wild-born and captive-born tortoises, four second-order relationships (half-sibling) between wild-born and captive tortoises (full-sibs or parent-offspring), and one second-order relationship between two captive-born tortoises. Of particular note, we also reconstructed a first-order relationship between two wild-born individuals, violating the founder assumption. Overall, our results contribute to a worldwide effort in identifying genetically important Galápagos tortoises currently in captivity while revealing closely related founders, reconstructing genealogical relationships, and providing detailed management recommendations for the SDZ tortoises.
    Keywords: Chelonoidis ; Galapagos ; Captive and Wild‐Born Lineage Identification ; Microsatellites ; Tortoise ; Genetic Markers ; Animals, Zoo -- Genetics ; Haplotypes -- Genetics ; Microsatellite Repeats -- Genetics ; Turtles -- Genetics
    ISSN: 07333188
    E-ISSN: 1098-2361
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Zoo Biology, 1994, Vol.13(4), pp.297-299
    Description: Is population management (i.e., genetic and demographic management) conservation? We believe the short answer is no, not by itself. Does this mean we recommend ignoring population management? Certainly not. Population management is a critical aspect of good animal management, essential...
    Keywords: Reviews ; Genetic Factors ; Demography ; Population Regulation ; Reviews ; Genetic Factors ; Demography ; Population Regulation ; Conservation ; Theoretical Genetics;
    ISSN: 0733-3188
    E-ISSN: 1098-2361
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Zoo Biology, 1991, Vol.10(4), pp.285-292
    ISSN: 0733-3188
    E-ISSN: 1098-2361
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Zoo Biology, 1995, Vol.14(1), pp.5-25
    Description: Strategic collection planning is a relatively new concept for zoos. Until recently, personal preference, availability, and competition determined which species or subspecies were acquired. In the last few years, however, there have been attempts to employ systematic criteria for taxon selection that better serve conservation objectives. Planning currently occurs at three levels: global, regional, and institutional. The current planning process is reviewed and recommendations are made for ways the process might be improved. An efficient, economical, and effective collection planning process is critical if modern, professionally managed zoological institutions are to make a significant impact on wildlife and ecosystem conservation. Rather than selecting taxa solely on the possibility of a future reintroduction, serious consideration should be given to the ability of a species or subspecies to contribute to more immediate conservation goals, including public education, fund raising to support field conservation, and scientific research. Because resources are limited, perhaps zoos should focus their long‐term breeding programs primarily on flagship species—that is, those that have the potential to excite public attention and help to protect habitat and other taxa—rather than on a broad array of species that are currently endangered. © 1995 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.
    Keywords: Zoo ; Iucn/Ssc Captive Breeding Specialist Group ; Iudzg ; Taxon Advisory Group ; Aza Species Survival Plan
    ISSN: 0733-3188
    E-ISSN: 1098-2361
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Zoo Biology, 1995, Vol.14(1), pp.67-80
    ISSN: 0733-3188
    E-ISSN: 1098-2361
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