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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 27 June 2017, Vol.114(26), pp.6824-6829
    Description: The functions of many bacterial RNA-binding proteins remain obscure because of a lack of knowledge of their cellular ligands. Although well-studied cold-shock protein A (CspA) family members are induced and function at low temperature, others are highly expressed in infection-relevant conditions. Here, we have profiled transcripts bound in vivo by the CspA family members of serovar Typhimurium to link the constitutively expressed CspC and CspE proteins with virulence pathways. Phenotypic assays in vitro demonstrated a crucial role for these proteins in membrane stress, motility, and biofilm formation. Moreover, double deletion of and fully attenuates in systemic mouse infection. In other words, the RNA ligand-centric approach taken here overcomes a problematic molecular redundancy of CspC and CspE that likely explains why these proteins have evaded selection in previous virulence factor screens in animals. Our results highlight RNA-binding proteins as regulators of pathogenicity and potential targets of antimicrobial therapy. They also suggest that globally acting RNA-binding proteins are more common in bacteria than currently appreciated.
    Keywords: RNA-Binding Protein ; Salmonella ; Bacterial Pathogenesis ; Cold-Shock Protein ; Stress Response ; Bacterial Proteins ; Cold Shock Proteins and Peptides ; Heat-Shock Proteins ; RNA-Binding Proteins ; Salmonella Infections ; Salmonella Typhimurium ; Virulence Factors
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    In: EMBO Journal, 03 July 2013, Vol.32(13), pp.1802-1804
    Description: CRISPR systems not only defend bacteria from foreign DNA but also contribute to pathogenicity, by regulating endogenous gene expression to evade host innate immune responses.
    Keywords: Animals–Immunology ; Female–Pathogenicity ; Gammaproteobacteria–Immunology ; Gammaproteobacteria–Immunology ; Immune Evasion–Immunology ; Immunity, Innate–Immunology ; Germany ; Prokaryotes ; Gene Expression ; Eukaryotes ; Bacteria ; Molecular Biology;
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2011, Vol.6(3), p.e17296
    Description: P-bodies are dynamic aggregates of RNA and proteins involved in several post-transcriptional regulation processes. P-bodies have been shown to play important roles in regulating viral infection, whereas their interplay with bacterial pathogens, specifically intracellular bacteria that extensively manipulate host cell pathways, remains unknown. Here, we report that Salmonella infection induces P-body disassembly in a cell type-specific manner, and independently of previously characterized pathways such as inhibition of host cell RNA synthesis or microRNA-mediated gene silencing. We show that the Salmonella -induced P-body disassembly depends on the activation of the SPI-2 encoded type 3 secretion system, and that the secreted effector protein SpvB plays a major role in this process. P-body disruption is also induced by the related pathogen, Shigella flexneri , arguing that this might be a new mechanism by which intracellular bacterial pathogens subvert host cell function.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Infectious Diseases ; Microbiology ; Molecular Biology ; Cell Biology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Nucleic acids research, 07 January 2013, Vol.41(1), pp.542-53
    Description: Many microRNAs (miRNAs) are co-regulated during the same physiological process but the underlying cellular logic is often little understood. The conserved, immunomodulatory miRNAs miR-146 and miR-155, for instance, are co-induced in many cell types in response to microbial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to feedback-repress LPS signalling through Toll-like receptor TLR4. Here, we report that these seemingly co-induced regulatory RNAs dramatically differ in their induction behaviour under various stimuli strengths and act non-redundantly through functional specialization; although miR-146 expression saturates at sub-inflammatory doses of LPS that do not trigger the messengers of inflammation markers, miR-155 remains tightly associated with the pro-inflammatory transcriptional programmes. Consequently, we found that both miRNAs control distinct mRNA target profiles; although miR-146 targets the messengers of LPS signal transduction components and thus downregulates cellular LPS sensitivity, miR-155 targets the mRNAs of genes pervasively involved in pro-inflammatory transcriptional programmes. Thus, miR-155 acts as a broad limiter of pro-inflammatory gene expression once the miR-146 dependent barrier to LPS triggered inflammation has been breached. Importantly, we also report alternative miR-155 activation by the sensing of bacterial peptidoglycan through cytoplasmic NOD-like receptor, NOD2. We predict that dose-dependent responses to environmental stimuli may involve functional specialization of seemingly co-induced miRNAs in other cellular circuitries as well.
    Keywords: Immunity, Innate -- Genetics ; Micrornas -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 03051048
    E-ISSN: 1362-4962
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Science (New York, N.Y.), 07 December 2018, Vol.362(6419), pp.1156-1160
    Description: Many bacterial infections are hard to treat and tend to relapse, possibly due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant persisters. In vitro, persister cells appear to be dormant. After uptake of species by macrophages, nongrowing persisters also occur, but their physiological state is poorly understood. In this work, we show that persisters arising during macrophage infection maintain a metabolically active state. Persisters reprogram macrophages by means of effectors secreted by the pathogenicity island 2 type 3 secretion system. These effectors dampened proinflammatory innate immune responses and induced anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization. Such reprogramming allowed nongrowing cells to survive for extended periods in their host. Persisters undermining host immune defenses might confer an advantage to the pathogen during relapse once antibiotic pressure is relieved.
    Keywords: Drug Resistance, Bacterial ; Host-Pathogen Interactions -- Immunology ; Macrophages -- Immunology ; Salmonella Infections -- Drug Therapy ; Salmonella Typhimurium -- Metabolism ; Type III Secretion Systems -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00368075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Nature, 28 January 2016, Vol.529(7587), pp.496-501
    Description: Bacteria express many small RNAs for which the regulatory roles in pathogenesis have remained poorly understood due to a paucity of robust phenotypes in standard virulence assays. Here we use a generic 'dual RNA-seq' approach to profile RNA expression simultaneously in pathogen and host during Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection and reveal the molecular impact of bacterial riboregulators. We identify a PhoP-activated small RNA, PinT, which upon bacterial internalization temporally controls the expression of both invasion-associated effectors and virulence genes required for intracellular survival. This riboregulatory activity causes pervasive changes in coding and noncoding transcripts of the host. Interspecies correlation analysis links PinT to host cell JAK-STAT signalling, and we identify infection-specific alterations in multiple long noncoding RNAs. Our study provides a paradigm for a sensitive RNA-based analysis of intracellular bacterial pathogens and their hosts without physical separation, as well as a new discovery route for hidden functions of pathogen genes.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation -- Genetics ; Host-Pathogen Interactions -- Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Untranslated -- Genetics ; Salmonella Typhimurium -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00280836
    E-ISSN: 1476-4687
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  • 7
    In: EMBO Journal, 18 May 2011, Vol.30(10), pp.1977-1989
    Description: MicroRNAs have well‐established roles in eukaryotic host responses to viruses and extracellular bacterial pathogens. In contrast, microRNA responses to invasive bacteria have remained unknown. Here, we report cell type‐dependent microRNA regulations upon infection of mammalian cells with the enteroinvasive pathogen, Typhimurium. Murine macrophages strongly upregulate NF‐κB associated microRNAs; strikingly, these regulations which are induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) occur and persist regardless of successful host invasion and/or replication, or whether an inflammatory response is mounted, suggesting that microRNAs belong to the first line of anti‐bacterial defence. However, a suppression of the global immune regulator miR‐155 in endotoxin‐tolerant macrophages revealed that microRNA responses also depend on the status of infected cells. This study identifies the family as the common denominator of ‐regulated microRNAs in macrophages and epithelial cells, and suggests that repression of relieves cytokine IL‐6 and IL‐10 mRNAs from negative post‐transcriptional control. Our results establish a paradigm of microRNA‐mediated feed‐forward activation of inflammatory factors when mammalian cells are targeted by bacterial pathogens. This study describes the global mammalian micoRNA response to infection and the role of miRNAs in regulating the post‐transcriptional control of inflammatory cytokines.
    Keywords: Il‐10 ; Let‐7 ; Mir‐155 ; Mirna ; Salmonella
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology, 2014, Vol.4, pp.91
    Description: Enteric pathogens often cycle between virulent and saprophytic lifestyles. To endure these frequent changes in nutrient availability and composition bacteria possess an arsenal of regulatory and metabolic genes allowing rapid adaptation and high flexibility. While numerous proteins have been characterized with regard to metabolic control in pathogenic bacteria, small non-coding RNAs have emerged as additional regulators of metabolism. Recent advances in sequencing technology have vastly increased the number of candidate regulatory RNAs and several of them have been found to act at the interface of bacterial metabolism and virulence factor expression. Importantly, studying these riboregulators has not only provided insight into their metabolic control functions but also revealed new mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene control. This review will focus on the recent advances in this area of host-microbe interaction and discuss how regulatory small RNAs may help coordinate metabolism and virulence of enteric pathogens.
    Keywords: Csra ; Hfq ; Carbon Metabolism ; Srna ; Virulence ; Energy Metabolism ; Carbon -- Metabolism ; Intestines -- Microbiology ; RNA, Small Untranslated -- Genetics
    E-ISSN: 2235-2988
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  • 9
    In: EMBO Journal, 03 December 2018, Vol.37(23), pp.n/a-n/a
    Description: While mucosal inflammation is a major source of stress during enteropathogen infection, it remains to be fully elucidated how the host benefits from this environment to clear the pathogen. Here, we show that host stress induced by different stimuli mimicking inflammatory conditions strongly reduces the binding of to epithelial cells. Mechanistically, stress activates acid sphingomyelinase leading to host membrane remodeling. Consequently, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of the acid sphingomyelinase blunts the stress‐dependent inhibition of binding to host cells. Interestingly, stress caused by intracellular replication also results in remodeling of the host cell membrane, and , which precludes re‐infection by this and other non‐motile pathogens. In contrast, Typhimurium overcomes the shortage of permissive entry sites by gathering effectively at the remaining platforms through its flagellar motility. Overall, our findings reveal host membrane remodeling as a novel stress‐responsive cell‐autonomous defense mechanism that protects epithelial cells from infection by non‐motile bacterial pathogens. Stress‐induced host membrane remodeling constitutes a novel cell‐autonomous defensive mechanism that protects epithelial cells from infection by and other non‐motile bacterial pathogens. Host oxidative stress strongly reduces S. flexneri binding to epithelial cells. Stress leads to host membrane remodeling, via activation of the acid sphingomyelinase by the MAPK p38 pathway, resulting in the formation of ceramide domains. Intracellular Shigella replication induces remodeling of the host cell membrane, in vitro and in vivo. Stress‐induced host membrane remodeling precludes re‐infection by non‐motile pathogens; motile pathogens are able to overcome this barrier through flagellar motility. Host membrane remodeling is a cell‐autonomous defense mechanism that protects epithelial cells from infection by .
    Keywords: Acid Sphingomyelinase ; Host Stress Response ; Membrane Remodeling ; Salmonella ; Shigella
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 31 May 2016, Vol.113(22), pp.E3101-10
    Description: Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial pathogen, which causes severe blood and tissue infections that frequently emerge by autoinfection with asymptomatically carried nose and skin populations. However, recent studies report that bloodstream isolates differ systematically from those found in the nose and skin, exhibiting reduced toxicity toward leukocytes. In two patients, an attenuated toxicity bloodstream infection evolved from an asymptomatically carried high-toxicity nasal strain by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor repressor of surface proteins (rsp). Here, we report that rsp knockout mutants lead to global transcriptional and proteomic reprofiling, and they exhibit the greatest signal in a genome-wide screen for genes influencing S. aureus survival in human cells. This effect is likely to be mediated in part via SSR42, a long-noncoding RNA. We show that rsp controls SSR42 expression, is induced by hydrogen peroxide, and is required for normal cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity. Rsp inactivation in laboratory- and bacteremia-derived mutants attenuates toxin production, but up-regulates other immune subversion proteins and reduces lethality during experimental infection. Crucially, inactivation of rsp preserves bacterial dissemination, because it affects neither formation of deep abscesses in mice nor survival in human blood. Thus, we have identified a spontaneously evolving, attenuated-cytotoxicity, nonhemolytic S. aureus phenotype, controlled by a pleiotropic transcriptional regulator/noncoding RNA virulence regulatory system, capable of causing S. aureus bloodstream infections. Such a phenotype could promote deep infection with limited early clinical manifestations, raising concerns that bacterial evolution within the human body may contribute to severe infection.
    Keywords: Ssr42 ; Staphylococcus Aureus ; Bloodstream Infection ; Rsp ; Toxicity Regulator ; Apoptosis ; Abscess -- Etiology ; Bacteremia -- Etiology ; Bacterial Proteins -- Genetics ; Mutation -- Genetics ; RNA, Untranslated -- Genetics ; Staphylococcal Infections -- Complications ; Virulence Factors -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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