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  • Doerr, Hans  (10)
  • Cinatl, J.
  • Antiviral Agents
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Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Medical Microbiology and Immunology, 2007, Vol.196(4), pp.203-212
    Description: Among emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, influenza constitutes one of the major threats to mankind. In this review series epidemiologic, virologic and pathologic concerns raised by infections of humans with avian influenza virus A/H5N1 as well as treatment options are discussed. The third part discusses therapeutic options. Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors are the most promising agents despite uncertainty about efficacy. Dosage increase, prolonged treatment or combination therapies may increase treatment efficacy and/or inhibit resistance formation. Immune system dysregulation contributes to H5N1 disease. Although current evidence does not support the use of anti-inflammatory drugs beneficial effects cannot be excluded at later disease stages.
    Keywords: Antiviral Agents ; Avian Influenza;
    ISSN: 0300-8584
    E-ISSN: 1432-1831
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, 2011, Vol.68(6), pp.1079-1090
    Description: Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. Here, non-toxic concentrations of the anti-cancer kinase inhibitor sorafenib were shown to inhibit replication of different HCMV strains (including a ganciclovir-resistant strain) in different cell types. In contrast to established anti-HCMV drugs, sorafenib inhibited HCMV major immediate early promoter activity and HCMV immediate early antigen (IEA) expression. Sorafenib is known to inhibit Raf. Comparison of sorafenib with the MEK inhibitor U0126 suggested that sorafenib inhibits HCMV IEA expression through inhibition of Raf but independently of signaling through the Raf downstream kinase MEK 1/2. In concordance, siRNA-mediated depletion of Raf but not of MEK-reduced IEA expression. In conclusion, sorafenib diminished HCMV replication in clinically relevant concentrations and inhibited HCMV IEA expression, a pathophysiologically relevant event that is not affected by established anti-HCMV drugs. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that Raf activation is involved in HCMV IEA expression.
    Keywords: Human cytomegalovirus ; Sorafenib ; Kinase inhibitor ; Raf ; Immediate early antigen ; Cancer chemotherapy ; Oncomodulation ; Antiviral therapy
    ISSN: 1420-682X
    E-ISSN: 1420-9071
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Phytomedicine, 2011, Vol.18(5), pp.384-386
    Description: The extract EPs 7630 is an approved drug for the treatment of acute bronchitis in Germany. The postulated mechanisms underlying beneficial effects of EPs 7630 in bronchitis patients include immunomodulatory and cytoprotective effects, inhibition of interaction between bacteria and host cells, and increase of cilliary beat frequency on respiratory cells. Here, we investigated the influence of EPs 7630 on replication of a panel of respiratory viruses. Determination of virus-induced cytopathogenic effects and virus titres revealed that EPs 7630 at concentrations up to 100 μg/ml interfered with replication of seasonal influenza A virus strains (H1N1, H3N2), respiratory syncytial virus, human coronavirus, parainfluenza virus, and coxsackie virus but did not affect replication of highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus (H5N1), adenovirus, or rhinovirus. Therefore, antiviral effects may contribute to the beneficial effects exerted by EPs 7630 in acute bronchitis patients.
    Keywords: Pelargonium Sidoides ; Respiratory Viruses ; Acute Bronchitis ; Medicine ; Pharmacy, Therapeutics, & Pharmacology
    ISSN: 0944-7113
    E-ISSN: 1618-095X
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Biochemical Pharmacology, 15 January 2010, Vol.79(2), pp.188-197
    Description: Ribavirin, a broad-spectrum anti-viral drug, exhibits immunomodulatory activities. To study direct effects of ribavirin on natural killer (NK) cell effector functions and signaling, resting NK cells and interleukin (IL)-15-activated NK cells were treated for 5 days with therapeutic ribavirin concentrations ranging from 5 μg/ml to 20 μg/ml. Both resting and IL-15-activated NK cells that were not treated with ribavirin were used as control. Cytotoxicity assays, flow cytometry, enzyme linked immunosorbent assays, and Western blot experiments were performed to elucidate ribavirin effect on NK cells. Results showed that ribavirin (not toxic at concentrations tested; IC 〉 80 μg/ml) had no influence on lysis of target cells by freshly isolated NK cells. Conversely, ribavirin dose-dependently inhibited lysis of target cells by up to 66% and impaired interferon gamma production when IL-15-activated NK cells were used. IL-15-induced increased expression and hence function of NK cell activating receptors including NKp30, NKp44, NKp46 and NKG2D were selectively down-regulated and impaired. These inhibitory effects were associated with the down-regulation of IL-15 receptor beta and gamma expression. Accordingly, downstream events involved in NK cell signaling via IL-15 receptors including the activation of Janus kinase (Jak)-1, signal transducer and activator of transcription STAT-1, STAT-3, and STAT-5 as well as pathways responsible for NK cell degranulation including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) were impaired. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which ribavirin exerts its immunomodulatory activities.
    Keywords: Nk Cell Activating Receptors ; Nk Cell Signaling ; Nk Cell Degranulation ; Perforin and Granzyme B Release ; Il-15 Receptors ; Pharmacy, Therapeutics, & Pharmacology ; Chemistry
    ISSN: 0006-2952
    E-ISSN: 1873-2968
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  • 5
    In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 2007, Vol. 60(5), pp.981-986
    Description: OBJECTIVES: West Nile virus (WNV) infection causes severe meningitis and encephalitis in a subset of patients. WNV-induced apoptosis has been suggested to contribute to WNV pathogenesis. Tetracyclines exert antiviral effects against HIV and inhibit apoptosis in different models of neuronal disease. Here, the effects of the tetracyclines minocycline, demeclocycline and chlortetracycline were observed on WNV replication and WNV-induced apoptosis in different human CNS-derived cell types (primary human brain neurons, primary human retinal pigment epithelial cells and T98G human glioma cell line). METHODS: WNV replication was studied by cytopathic effects and virus yield reduction assay. Cell viability was examined by MTT assay. Apoptosis was investigated by immunostaining for activated caspase 3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Expression and phosphorylation of cellular proteins were examined by western blot. RESULTS: Minocycline exerted the strongest anti-WNV activity. Non-toxic minocycline concentrations that can be achieved in human tissues significantly reduced WNV titres in all cell types tested. Minocycline inhibited WNV-induced apoptosis and suppressed virus-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and its target c-jun. The JNK inhibitor L-JNKi exerted similar effects to minocycline. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that minocycline-induced inhibition of JNK activation contributes to minocycline-induced inhibition of WNV replication and WNV-induced apoptosis. Minocycline is a clinically available, inexpensive and generally very well-tolerated drug. It could be readily evaluated for the treatment of humans with serious WNV infection.
    Keywords: Antiviral Therapy ; Brain ; Central Nervous System ; Antibiotic ; Encephalitis
    ISSN: 0305-7453
    E-ISSN: 1460-2091
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Medical Microbiology and Immunology, 2009, Vol.198(3), pp.175-183
    Description: Influenza A viruses represent a continuous pandemic threat. In April 2009, a novel influenza A virus, the so-called swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus (S-OIV), was identified in Mexico. Although S-OIV originates from triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) that has been circulating in North American pig herds since the end of the 1990s, S-OIV is readily transmitted between humans but is not epidemic in pigs. After its discovery, S-OIV rapidly spread throughout the world within few weeks. In this review, we sum up the current situation and put it into the context of the current state of knowledge of influenza and influenza pandemics. Some indications suggest that a pandemic may be mild but even “mild” pandemics can result in millions of deaths. However, no reasonable forecasts how this pandemic may develop can be made at this time. Despite stockpiling by many countries and WHO, antiviral drugs will be limited in case of pandemic and resistances may emerge. Effective vaccines are regarded to be crucial for the control of influenza pandemics. However, production capacities are restricted and development/production of a S-OIV vaccine will interfere with manufacturing of seasonal influenza vaccines. The authors are convinced that S-OIV should be taken seriously as pandemic threat and underestimation of the menace by S-OIV to be by far more dangerous than its overestimation.
    Keywords: Swine influenza ; H1N1 ; Swine-origin influenza A (H1N1) virus ; Pandemic
    ISSN: 0300-8584
    E-ISSN: 1432-1831
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Current Molecular Medicine, March 2009, Vol.9(2), pp.131-151
    Description: Highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus can infect humans and is currently the most deadly influenza virus that has crossed the species barrier. As of December 2007, the spread of H5N1 virus from human to human has been rare. Nobody can predict if H5N1 may cause a pandemic. However, the number of human cases is continuously increasing and changes in virulence and epidemiology have been detected. There are specific pathogenic features of H5N1 infection. In contrast to human-adapted influenza A strains, H5N1 preferentially infects cells of the lower respiratory tract and may spread to tissues outside the respiratory tract in humans. Moreover, H5N1 replication is prolonged in target organs and results in higher viral loads and increased tissue damage. These features will have to be considered for therapeutic protocols for H5N1 infection in humans. Rapid genetic and antigenic changes observed in H5N1 virus isolates represent a challenge for the development of vaccines. In the present review, current knowledge about epidemiology, virulence factors and pathology of H5N1 infections in humans are summarised and discussed. Moreover, the possible roles of antiinfluenza drugs in the pandemic situation as well as the development of effective vaccines are subject of this overview.
    Keywords: Pathogenic H5n1 ; Avian Influenza ; Humans ; Of Chickens ; Epidemiology ; Epidemiology
    ISSN: 1566-5240
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 2008, Vol.120(1), pp.108-111
    Description: Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a life-threatening disease caused by the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The development of new antiviral agents for SARS-CoV is an important issue. We tried to find potential resource from Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for development of new drugs against SARS-CoV. Our team recruited the potential TCM formulae (also known as Kampo) from two TCM books, Shang-Han Lun (Discussion of Cold-Induced Disorders) and Wen-Bing Tiau-Bein (Differential Management of Febrile Diseases). Several herbs, which were believed to be beneficial for SARS by experienced TCM doctors were also recruited. In addition, a vegetable polular in Taiwan, China and Malaysia, the tender leaf of Roem (also known as Cedrela sinensis, belongs to the family Meliacceae) was also recruited under the suggestion of botanic experts. These TCM products and plant extrats were then tested for the effectiveness against SARS-CoV in vitro. Only TSL-1, the extract from tender leaf of Roem was found to have an evident effect against SARS-CoV with selectivity index 12∼17. This paper reports for the first time that extract from a vegetable, the tender leaf of Roem, can inhibit SARS-CoV in vitro. Thererfore, the tender leaf of Roem may be an important resource agninst SARS-CoV.
    Keywords: Sars ; Herb ; Traditional Chinese Medicine (Tcm) ; Toona Sinensis Roem ; Pharmacy, Therapeutics, & Pharmacology
    ISSN: 0378-8741
    E-ISSN: 1872-7573
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Medical Microbiology and Immunology, 2005, Vol.194(1), pp.55-59
    Description: Intracellular glutathione (GSH) plays an important regulatory role in the host response to viral infections. Replenishment of intracellular GSH is a desirable yet challenging goal, since systemic GSH supplementation is rather inefficient due to a short half-life of GSH in blood plasma. Further, GSH is not taken up by cells directly, but needs to be broken down into amino acids and resynthesized to GSH intracellularly, this process often being impaired during viral infections. These obstacles may be overcome by a novel glutathione derivative S-acetylglutathione (S-GSH), which is more stable in plasma and taken up directly by cells with subsequent conversion to GSH. In the present study, in vitro effects of supplementation with S-GSH or GSH on intracellular GSH levels, cell survival and replication of human herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were studied in human foreskin fibroblasts. In addition, in vivo effects of supplementation with S-GSH or GSH on HSV-1-induced mortality were studied in hr/hr mice. In cell culture, viral infection resulted in a significant decrease of intracellular GSH levels. S-GSH efficiently and dose-dependently (5 and 10 mM tested) restored intracellular GSH, and this replenishment was more efficient than with GSH supplementation. In mice, S-GSH, but not GSH, significantly decreased HSV-1-induced mortality ( P 〈0.05). The data suggest that S-GSH is a suitable antiviral agent against HSV-1 both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that this drug may be of benefit in the adjunctive therapy of HSV-1 infections.
    Keywords: Intracellular glutathione ; S-acetylglutathione ; Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection ; Antiviral drugs
    ISSN: 0300-8584
    E-ISSN: 1432-1831
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Medical Microbiology and Immunology, 2004, Vol.193(4), pp.195-203
    Description: Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) retinitis causing retinal detachment and destruction of the blood-retina barrier is closely related to retinal hemorrhage/coagulation. However, the effects of procoagulants on HCMV (re)activation in retinal cells have not been investigated yet. Therefore, we studied whether thrombin modulates the expression of HCMV immediate early (IE) and late (L) genes in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE). Thrombin specifically stimulated the protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) on RPE and, surprisingly, inhibited basal and 12,0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-stimulated HCMV IE gene expression in infected RPE. On the other hand, HCMV strongly induced Sp1 DNA binding activity, which was prevented by thrombin/PAR1-mediated Sp1 hyperphosphorylation. Our data suggest that thrombin/PAR-1 may inhibit Sp1-dependent HCMV replication, which might be an important regulatory mechanism for HCMV persistence and replication in RPE.
    Keywords: Human cytomegalovirus ; Infectious immunity virus ; Retina ; Signal transduction ; Transcription factors
    ISSN: 0300-8584
    E-ISSN: 1432-1831
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