Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Bacteria
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Emerging infectious diseases, December 2013, Vol.19(12), pp.2058-60
    Description: To the Editor: In 2012, the World Health Organization launched plans for a second campaign to eradicate the neglected tropical disease, yaws (1). The first campaign, conducted during the mid-20th century, was tremendously successful in terms of treatment and reduced the number of cases by 95%. However, it failed to eradicate the disease, and when local efforts to prevent new cases proved insufficient, yaws resurged in some areas. Comments on the new yaws eradication campaign have emphasized the need for sustained support and resources. Here we draw attention to an additional concern that could impede yaws eradication efforts.
    Keywords: Africa ; World Health Organization ; Bacteria ; Eradication ; Nonhuman Primates ; Pallidum ; Pertenue ; Syphilis ; Treponeme ; Yaws ; Zoonoses ; Disease Reservoirs ; Monkey Diseases -- Transmission ; Primates -- Microbiology ; Treponemal Infections -- Veterinary ; Yaws -- Transmission
    ISSN: 10806040
    E-ISSN: 1080-6059
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2015, Vol.10(11), p.e0143100
    Description: The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90%) baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560) versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7). Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication campaign with its goal to eradicate yaws by 2020.
    Keywords: Sciences (General)
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    In: Emerging Microbes & Infections, 2017, Vol.6(9), p.e79
    Description: Central to the One Health approach and any disease eradication program is the question of whether a pathogen has a non-human reservoir. Despite well-established conceptual frameworks that define a reservoir of infection, empirical characterization of reservoirs often remains controversial, challenging and sometimes misleading. What is essentially missing are applicable requirements that standardize the use of the term 'reservoir of infection' across multiple disciplines. We propose an empirical framework, considering maintenance and feasible transmission of a pathogen, to standardize the acceptance of a disease reservoir across multiple disciplines. We demonstrate the intended use of these requirements by applying them to different diseases that are known to infect both humans and animals.
    Keywords: Public Health;
    ISSN: 2222-1751
    E-ISSN: 2222-1751
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Scientific reports, 19 April 2018, Vol.8(1), pp.6292
    Description: Next-generation sequencing approaches used to characterize microbial communities are subject to technical caveats that can lead to major distortion of acquired data. Determining the optimal sample handling protocol is essential to minimize the bias for different sample types. Using a mock community composed...
    Keywords: Buffers ; Bacteria -- Isolation & Purification ; DNA, Bacterial -- Isolation & Purification
    E-ISSN: 2045-2322
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Emerging infectious diseases, May 2017, Vol.23(5), pp.816-819
    Description: Survey results showed treponemal infection among pet macaques in Southeast Asia, a region with a high prevalence of human yaws. This finding, along with studies showing treponemal infection in nonhuman primates in Africa, should encourage a One Health approach to yaws eradication and surveillance activities, possibly including monitoring of nonhuman primates in yaws-endemic regions.
    Keywords: Asia ; Indonesia ; Macaca Spp. ; One Health ; Southeast Asia ; Sulawesi ; Treponema Pallidum ; Treponema Pallidum Subsp. Pertenue ; Bacteria ; Eradication ; Macaques ; Mammalian Host Reservoirs ; Nonhuman Primates ; Nontreponemal ; Pets ; Surveillance ; Yaws ; Monkey Diseases -- Epidemiology ; Treponemal Infections -- Veterinary
    ISSN: 10806040
    E-ISSN: 1080-6059
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Emerging infectious diseases, June 2018, Vol.24(6), pp.1002-1009
    Description: We investigated Treponema pallidum infection in 8 nonhuman primate species (289 animals) in Tanzania during 2015-2017. We used a serologic treponemal test to detect antibodies against the bacterium. Infection was further confirmed from tissue samples of skin-ulcerated animals by 3 independent PCRs (polA, tp47, and TP_0619). Our findings indicate that T. pallidum infection is geographically widespread in Tanzania and occurs in several species (olive baboons, yellow baboons, vervet monkeys, and blue monkeys). We found the bacterium at 11 of 14 investigated geographic locations. Anogenital ulceration was the most common clinical manifestation; orofacial lesions also were observed. Molecular data show that nonhuman primates in Tanzania are most likely infected with T. pallidum subsp. pertenue-like strains, which could have implications for human yaws eradication.
    Keywords: Africa ; One Health ; Tanzania ; Treponema Pallidum ; Bacteria ; Eradication ; Infection ; Nonhuman Primates ; Spirochetes ; Yaws ; Treponema Pallidum ; Primate Diseases -- Epidemiology ; Yaws -- Veterinary
    ISSN: 10806040
    E-ISSN: 1080-6059
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Houinei, W., C. Godornes, A. Kapa, S. Knauf, E. Q. Mooring, C. González-Beiras, R. Watup, et al. 2017. “Haemophilus ducreyi DNA is detectable on the skin of asymptomatic children, flies and fomites in villages of Papua New Guinea.” PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 11 (5): e0004958. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0004958. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0004958.
    Description: Background: Haemophilus ducreyi and Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue are major causes of leg ulcers in children in Africa and the Pacific Region. We investigated the presence of DNA (PCR positivity) from these bacteria on asymptomatic people, flies, and household linens in an endemic setting. Methodology/Principal findings We performed a cross-sectional study in rural villages of Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea during a yaws elimination campaign. Participants were asymptomatic subjects recruited from households with cases of leg ulcers, and from households without cases of leg ulcers. We rubbed swabs on the intact skin of the leg of asymptomatic individuals, and collected flies and swabs of environmental surfaces. All specimens were tested by PCR for H. ducreyi and T. p. pertenue DNA. Of 78 asymptomatic participants that had an adequate specimen for DNA detection, H. ducreyi-PCR positivity was identified in 16 (21%) and T. p. pertenue-PCR positivity in 1 (1%). In subgroup analyses, H. ducreyi-PCR positivity did not differ in participants exposed or not exposed to a case of H. ducreyi ulcer in the household (24% vs 18%; p = 0.76). Of 17 cultures obtained from asymptomatic participants, 2 (12%) yielded a definitive diagnosis of H. ducreyi, proving skin colonization. Of 10 flies tested, 9 (90%) had H. ducreyi DNA and 5 (50%) had T. p. pertenue DNA. Of 6 bed sheets sampled, 2 (33%) had H. ducreyi DNA and 1 (17%) had T. p. pertenue DNA. Conclusions/Significance: This is the first time that H. ducreyi DNA and colonization has been demonstrated on the skin of asymptomatic children and that H. ducreyi DNA and T. p. pertenue DNA has been identified in flies and on fomites. The ubiquity of H. ducreyi in the environment is a contributing factor to the spread of the organism.
    Keywords: Medicine And Health Sciences ; Diagnostic Medicine ; Signs And Symptoms ; Ulcers ; Pathology And Laboratory Medicine ; Biology And Life Sciences ; Molecular Biology ; Molecular Biology Techniques ; Artificial Gene Amplification And Extension ; Polymerase Chain Reaction ; Infectious Diseases ; Bacterial Diseases ; Treponematoses ; Yaws ; Tropical Diseases ; Neglected Tropical Diseases ; Dermatology ; Skin Infections ; Microbiology ; Medical Microbiology ; Microbial Pathogens ; Bacterial Pathogens ; Treponema Pallidum ; Pathogens ; Bacteriology ; Gram Negative Bacteria ; Extraction Techniques ; Dna Extraction ; Organisms ; Bacteria ; Haemophilus
    ISSN: 19352727
    E-ISSN: 19352735
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Emerging infectious diseases, November 2019, Vol.25(11), pp.2147-2149
    Description: Human yaws has historically been endemic to Kenya, but current epidemiologic data are lacking. We report seroprevalence for Treponema pallidum antibodies in olive baboons (Papio anubis) and vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) in Laikipia County, Kenya. Our results suggest endemicity of the yaws...
    Keywords: Kenya ; Laikipia County ; Treponema Pallidum ; Antibodies ; Baboon ; Bacteria ; Nonhuman Primates ; Primate ; Vervet Monkey ; Yaws ; Zoonoses
    ISSN: 10806040
    E-ISSN: 1080-6059
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages