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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences, 05 November 2016, Vol.371(1707)
    Description: Infection is a complicated balance, with both pathogen and host struggling to tilt the result in their favour. Bacterial infection biology has relied on forward genetics for many of its advances, defining phenotype in terms of replication in model systems. However, many known virulence factors fail to produce robust phenotypes, particularly in the systems most amenable to genetic manipulation, such as cell-culture models. This has particularly been limiting for the study of the bacterial regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) in infection. We argue that new sequencing-based technologies can work around this problem by providing a 'molecular phenotype', defined in terms of the specific transcriptional dysregulation in the infection system induced by gene deletion. We illustrate this using the example of our recent study of the PinT sRNA using dual RNA-seq, that is, simultaneous RNA sequencing of host and pathogen during infection. We additionally discuss how other high-throughput technologies, in particular genetic interaction mapping using transposon insertion sequencing, may be used to further dissect molecular phenotypes. We propose a strategy for how high-throughput technologies can be integrated in the study of non-coding regulators as well as bacterial virulence factors, enhancing our ability to rapidly generate hypotheses with regards to their function.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'.
    Keywords: Pint ; Tn-Seq ; Dual RNA-Seq ; Host–Pathogen Interaction ; Infection ; Small Non-Coding RNA ; Chromosome Mapping -- Methods ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing -- Methods ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Small Untranslated -- Genetics ; Sequence Analysis, RNA -- Methods
    ISSN: 09628436
    E-ISSN: 1471-2970
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  • 2
    In: Molecular Microbiology, April 2012, Vol.84(1), pp.1-5
    Description: The transcription factor CsgD governing the production of curli fimbriae and cellulose is a key player in the complex regulatory circuit that decides whether form biofilms. The gene itself is tightly controlled at the level of transcription by a large array of DNA‐binding proteins, but what happens after transcription is less understood. In this issue of , Jørgensen (2012), Mika (2012) and Thomason (2012) report on small RNAs (McaS, RprA and GcvB) that together with the RNA‐chaperone Hfq regulate the mRNAs of and other biofilm genes, and illustrate the burgeoning concept that the 5′ region of bacterial mRNA serves as a hub for sRNA‐mediated signal integration at the post‐transcriptional level.
    Keywords: Transcription (Genetics) ; Proteins ; Messenger Rna ; Genes ; Cellulose;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 3
    In: EMBO Journal, 03 July 2013, Vol.32(13), pp.1802-1804
    Description: CRISPR systems not only defend bacteria from foreign DNA but also contribute to pathogenicity, by regulating endogenous gene expression to evade host innate immune responses.
    Keywords: Animals–Immunology ; Female–Pathogenicity ; Gammaproteobacteria–Immunology ; Gammaproteobacteria–Immunology ; Immune Evasion–Immunology ; Immunity, Innate–Immunology ; Germany ; Prokaryotes ; Gene Expression ; Eukaryotes ; Bacteria ; Molecular Biology;
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 4
    In: Molecular Microbiology, December 2010, Vol.78(6), pp.1327-1331
    Description: Although most bacterial small RNAs act to repress target mRNAs, some also activate messengers. The predominant mode of activation has been seen in ‘anti‐antisense’ regulation whereby a small RNA prevents the formation of an inhibitory 5′ mRNA structure that otherwise impairs translational initiation and protein synthesis. The translational activation might also stabilize the target yet this was considered a secondary effect in the examples known thus far. Two recent papers in investigate post‐transcriptional activation of collagenase mRNA by VR‐RNA, and streptokinase mRNA by FasX RNA, to suggest that small RNAs exert positive regulation of virulence genes primarily at the level of mRNA stabilization.
    Keywords: Protein Synthesis ; Messenger Rna;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2011, Vol.6(3), p.e17296
    Description: P-bodies are dynamic aggregates of RNA and proteins involved in several post-transcriptional regulation processes. P-bodies have been shown to play important roles in regulating viral infection, whereas their interplay with bacterial pathogens, specifically intracellular bacteria that extensively manipulate host cell pathways, remains unknown. Here, we report that Salmonella infection induces P-body disassembly in a cell type-specific manner, and independently of previously characterized pathways such as inhibition of host cell RNA synthesis or microRNA-mediated gene silencing. We show that the Salmonella -induced P-body disassembly depends on the activation of the SPI-2 encoded type 3 secretion system, and that the secreted effector protein SpvB plays a major role in this process. P-body disruption is also induced by the related pathogen, Shigella flexneri , arguing that this might be a new mechanism by which intracellular bacterial pathogens subvert host cell function.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Infectious Diseases ; Microbiology ; Molecular Biology ; Cell Biology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Science (New York, N.Y.), 07 December 2018, Vol.362(6419), pp.1156-1160
    Description: Many bacterial infections are hard to treat and tend to relapse, possibly due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant persisters. In vitro, persister cells appear to be dormant. After uptake of species by macrophages, nongrowing persisters also occur, but their physiological state is poorly understood. In this work, we show that persisters arising during macrophage infection maintain a metabolically active state. Persisters reprogram macrophages by means of effectors secreted by the pathogenicity island 2 type 3 secretion system. These effectors dampened proinflammatory innate immune responses and induced anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization. Such reprogramming allowed nongrowing cells to survive for extended periods in their host. Persisters undermining host immune defenses might confer an advantage to the pathogen during relapse once antibiotic pressure is relieved.
    Keywords: Drug Resistance, Bacterial ; Host-Pathogen Interactions -- Immunology ; Macrophages -- Immunology ; Salmonella Infections -- Drug Therapy ; Salmonella Typhimurium -- Metabolism ; Type III Secretion Systems -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00368075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
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  • 7
    In: EMBO Journal, 03 June 2015, Vol.34(11), pp.1478-1492
    Description: There is an expanding list of examples by which one can posttranscriptionally influence the expression of others. This can involve sponges that sequester regulatory s of s in the same regulon, but the underlying molecular mechanism of such cross talk remains little understood. Here, we report sponge‐mediated cross talk in the posttranscriptional network of GcvB, a conserved Hfq‐dependent small with one of the largest regulons known in bacteria. We show that decay from the locus encoding an amino acid transporter generates a stable fragment (SroC) that base‐pairs with GcvB. This interaction triggers the degradation of GcvB by ase E, alleviating the GcvB‐mediated repression of other amino acid‐related transport and metabolic genes. Intriguingly, since the itself is a target of GcvB, the SroC sponge seems to enable both an internal feed‐forward loop to activate its parental in and activation of many ‐encoded s in the same pathway. Disabling this cross talk affects bacterial growth when peptides are the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. Decay of the bacterial GcvB , which keeps it from regulating its targets, is triggered by a 3′‐‐derived fragment from a target . This ability of s to compete for regulatory interaction presents a new mode of cross talk in bacteria. . Decay of the bacterial GcvB s, which keeps it from regulating its m targets, is triggered by a 3′‐‐derived fragment from a target m. This ability of ms to compete for regulatory interaction presents a new mode of cross talk in bacteria.
    Keywords: G Cv B ; H Fq ; Noncoding Rna ; Rn Ase E ; S Ro C
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 8
    In: EMBO Journal, 01 February 2017, Vol.36(3), pp.245-247
    Description: While bacteria were long thought to rely primarily on transcriptional control, it is now well established that they also use numerous small s to regulate translation and stability. There has recently been a surge in studies, including one by Waters ([Waters SA, 2017]) in this issue of , that have used clever variations of the ‐seq technique to comprehensively map small –target networks. Several recent studies have used clever variations of RNA‐seq techniques to comprehensively map small RNA–target networks involved in controlling bacterial gene expression.
    Keywords: Biology ; Chemistry;
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Cell, 11 April 2013, Vol.153(2), pp.426-437
    Description: Glucose homeostasis is strictly controlled in all domains of life. Bacteria that are unable to balance intracellular sugar levels and deal with potentially toxic phosphosugars cease growth and risk being outcompeted. Here, we identify the conserved haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzyme YigL as the previously hypothesized phosphatase for detoxification of phosphosugars and reveal that its synthesis is activated by an Hfq-dependent small RNA in . We show that the glucose-6-P-responsive small RNA SgrS activates YigL synthesis in a translation-independent fashion by the selective stabilization of a decay intermediate of the dicistronic messenger RNA (mRNA). Intriguingly, the major endoribonuclease RNase E, previously known to function together with small RNAs to degrade mRNA targets, is also essential for this process of mRNA activation. The exploitation of and targeted interference with regular RNA turnover described here may constitute a general route for small RNAs to rapidly activate both coding and noncoding genes. ► The bacterial small RNA SgrS posttranscriptionally activates the synthesis of YigL ► YigL is the previously hypothesized phosphatase that prevents phosphosugar toxicity ► SgrS activates yigL by a translation-independent mRNA-stabilization mechanism ► SgrS stabilizes an intermediate in the yigL mRNA decay pathway YigL, a long-sought bacterial phosphatase, regulates glucose-6-phosphate levels. A small regulatory RNA upregulates YigL synthesis by base pairing with the coding sequence of the preceding gene to interfere with endonucleolytic yigL mRNA decay.
    Keywords: Biology
    ISSN: 0092-8674
    E-ISSN: 1097-4172
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Science (New York, N.Y.), 30 May 2014, Vol.344(6187), pp.972-3
    Description: Argonaute proteins have emerged as the key effectors in virtually all eukaryotic small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways . Central to all their activities is their association with the small guide RNAs that allow them to recognize through sequence complementarity, and in some cases also cleave, cellular transcripts. [PUBLICATION ]
    Keywords: DNA Cleavage ; Gene Silencing ; Argonaute Proteins -- Metabolism ; DNA -- Metabolism ; DNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; Plasmids -- Genetics ; Prokaryotic Cells -- Metabolism ; Rhodobacter Sphaeroides -- Genetics ; Thermus Thermophilus -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00368075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
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