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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, February 2012, Vol.175(1), pp.3-3
    Keywords: Agriculture ; Biology ; Botany;
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Science of the Total Environment, 01 April 2013, Vol.449, pp.63-70
    Description: Increasing arsenic concentrations in freshwater ecosystems is of global concern. Processes affecting arsenic fluxes in catchments are known. These processes are in turn controlled by the underlying geology and air pollution history. In contrast to the knowledge on catchment processes less is known about the hydrochemical processes controlling the fixation/remobilization of arsenic within lakes and artificial reservoirs. Consequently, we examined a reservoir system in the Ore Mts. (Germany) regarding its sink and source potentials affecting arsenic fluxes. This area was faced with heavy deposition inputs from coal burning based acid rain until the beginning of the 1990s. Hereafter concentrations of sulfate and nitrate in runoff waters decreased, whereas dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations are still increasing. Along with this, arsenic concentrations in the water discharge from the catchments increase. Our results reveal that the sediments of the investigated reservoir system contain high inventories of arsenic in association with ferric and organic phases. A nitrate deficit dependent arsenic release is suggested. It is indicated that arsenic release from the reservoir sediments may be controlled by water nitrate concentration, which in turn is dependent on the nitrate concentration in the runoff water from the catchment. ► We examine increasing dissolved arsenic in water reservoirs. ► Arsenic release from sediments was controlled by decreasing water nitrate concentration. ► Basin sediment arsenic was found in ferric and humic matter. ► A long term trend of arsenic in water is negatively related to nitrate.
    Keywords: Arsenic Fluxes ; Iron ; Metalloid ; Nitrate ; Sediments ; Environmental Sciences ; Biology ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0048-9697
    E-ISSN: 1879-1026
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, December 2012, Vol.175(6), pp.797-797
    Keywords: Agriculture ; Biology ; Botany;
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, June 2012, Vol.175(3), pp.337-337
    Keywords: Agriculture ; Biology ; Botany;
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, October 2012, Vol.175(5), pp.649-649
    Keywords: Agriculture ; Biology ; Botany;
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, August 2012, Vol.175(4), pp.517-517
    Keywords: Agriculture ; Biology ; Botany;
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, June 2015, Vol.178(3), pp.486-498
    Description: Vegetation restoration efforts (planting trees and grass) have been effective in controlling soil erosion on the Loess Plateau (NW China). Shifts in land cover result in modifications of soil properties. Yet, whether the hydraulic properties have also been improved by vegetation restoration is still not clear. The objective of this paper was to understand how vegetation restoration alters soil structure and related soil hydraulic properties such as permeability and soil water storage capacity. Three adjacent sites with similar soil texture, soil type, and topography, but different land cover (black locust forest, grassland, and cropland) were selected in a typical small catchment in the middle reaches of the Yellow River (Loess Plateau). Seasonal variation of soil hydraulic properties in topsoil and subsoil were examined. Our study revealed that land‐use type had a significant impact on field‐saturated, near‐saturated hydraulic conductivity, and soil water characteristics. Specifically, conversion from cropland to grass or forests promotes infiltration capacity as a result of increased saturated hydraulic conductivity, air capacity, and macroporosity. Moreover, conversion from cropland to forest tends to promote the creation of mesopores, which increase soil water‐storage capacity. Tillage of cropland created temporarily well‐structured topsoil but compacted subsoil as indicated by low subsoil saturated hydraulic conductivity, air capacity, and plant‐available water capacity. No impact of land cover conversion on unsaturated hydraulic conductivities at suction 〉 300 cm was found indicating that changes in land cover do not affect functional meso‐ and microporosity. Our work demonstrates that changes in soil hydraulic properties resulting from soil conservation efforts need to be considered when soil conservation measures shall be implemented in water‐limited regions. For ensuring the sustainability of such measures, the impact of soil conversion on water resources and hydrological processes needs to be further investigated.
    Keywords: Hydraulic Conductivity ; Land‐Use Change ; Loess Plateau ; Tillage ; Water Retention Curve
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, 2009, Vol.258(10), pp.2163-2174
    Description: Knowledge of site-specific water conditions is important in forestland evaluation and fundamental for a sustainable forest management. In Central Europe, traditional site mapping has followed an integrated ecological approach. The assessment of soil water availability is based on overlaying relief and descriptive soil information. It is a relative system referring to an (hypothetical) equilibrium between relief-dependent soil conditions and the potential natural forest association at a given regional climate. Accordingly, the climatic settings are supposed to be constant and are mostly based on long-term means of precipitation and air temperature. However, long-term climate changes, as well as infrequent climatic extremes have not been considered adequately. Furthermore, the feedback of forest management itself on available soil water cannot be addressed. To overcome these shortcomings, we developed an approach in which the soil hydrological model LWF-BROOK90 is organized in a GIS-frame to simulate the daily water fluxes and soil moisture status. Spatially distributed meteorological input data is generated from long-term station data using special regionalization procedures. Model parameterization for soil physical properties by horizon are derived from detailed forest soil maps using pedotransfer functions. Thus, we obtained data on all components of the water balance depending on climate, aspect, slope, vertical soil properties, and stand conditions in a spatial resolution of 25 m × 25 m. In addition to the common output of site water balance models, additional indicators were implemented to enable the quantification of ‘transpiration stress’, ‘soil drought stress’, and ‘excess soil water stress’. Soil water evaluation is based on the number of days exceeding defined thresholds of parameter values. The implemented soil water indices were suitable to reflect relevant differences in the soil water conditions between sites whereas focusing on individual and extreme years rather than on long-term averages seems to be more appropriate for assessing water-related tree growth conditions. The next step will be to produce forest site maps based on such ‘stress’ indicators. The novel approach provides a more objective description of variable soil water conditions than the currently used mapping approach. Furthermore, it makes spatial hydrological data (e.g. groundwater recharge) available for use beyond forest management.
    Keywords: Forest Site Mapping ; Forest Site Evaluation ; Forest Climatology ; Soil Water Modelling ; Eco-Hydrology ; Hydropedology ; Forestry ; Biology
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    E-ISSN: 1872-7042
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, 2000, Vol.132(1), pp.111-119
    Description: European Forest Ecosystem Research Network (EFERN), was set up in 1996 as one result of the Ministerial Conferences on the Protection of European Forests in Strasbourg 1990 and Helsinki 1993 with the aim of promoting ecological research for sustainable forest management. Three plenary meetings were held, each with a specific theme. The results of these meetings have been documented in 10 chapters in a volume with the title 'Pathways to the wise use of forests in Europe'. The intention was also to give priorities for future forest ecosystem research. In accepting the idea that sustainability includes a multifunctional view of forests, there is a need to find ways of integrating classical forest ecosystem research with biodiversity, water quality and socio-economics. The balancing of the different interests in the forests can be done through planning. From this results also a choice of adequate management methods of the forest resources. The classical stand level in forestry requires now an additional scale -- the landscape level. The aim with this paper is to present a concept which attempts to integrate the disciplines involved -- ecosystem and landscape ecology and its components. Areas where research efforts are central are also mentioned.
    Keywords: Ecosystem and Landscape Forestry ; Sustainability ; Biodiversity ; Sustainable Biomass Production ; Water Quality ; Forest Management ; Socio-Economics ; Planning ; Forestry ; Biology
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    E-ISSN: 1872-7042
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, August 2016, Vol.179(4), pp.425-438
    Description: Understanding and quantification of phosphorus (P) fluxes are key requirements for predictions of future forest ecosystems changes as well as for transferring lessons learned from natural ecosystems to croplands and plantations. This review summarizes and evaluates the recent knowledge on mechanisms, magnitude, and relevance by which dissolved and colloidal inorganic and organic P forms can be translocated within or exported from forest ecosystems. Attention is paid to hydrological pathways of P losses at the soil profile and landscape scales, and the subsequent influence of P on aquatic ecosystems. New (unpublished) data from the German Priority Program 1685 “” were added to provide up‐to‐date flux‐based information. Nitrogen (N) additions increase the release of water‐transportable P forms. Most P found in percolates and pore waters belongs to the so‐called dissolved organic P (DOP) fractions, rich in orthophosphate‐monoesters and also containing some orthophosphate‐diesters. Total solution P concentrations range from ca. 1 to 400 µg P L, with large variations among forest stands. Recent sophisticated analyses revealed that large portions of the DOP in forest stream water can comprise natural nanoparticles and fine colloids which under extreme conditions may account for 40–100% of the P losses. Their translocation within preferential flow passes may be rapid, mediated by storm events. The potential total P loss through leaching into subsoils and with streams was found to be less than 50 mg P m a, suggesting effects on ecosystems at centennial to millennium scale. All current data are based on selected snapshots only. Quantitative measurements of P fluxes in temperate forest systems are nearly absent in the literature, probably due to main research focus on the C and N cycles. Therefore, we lack complete ecosystem‐based assessments of dissolved and colloidal P fluxes within and from temperate forest systems.
    Keywords: Forest Ecosystem ; Phosphorus ; Fluxes ; Soil ; Processes ; Hydrology
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
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