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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Colloids and surfaces, 2012, Vol.399, pp.35-40
    Description: Soil colloid science requires the separation of the colloids from larger particles in suspensions, which is frequently achieved by filtration. However, the results of filtration may be biased due to (i) pore clogging and (ii) the formation of a filter cake. In order to quantify these effects, we filtrated different volumes of soil suspensions containing mainly mineral (M), mainly organic (O) or mineral and organic (MO) colloids through 1.2μm membranes. Turbidity and the concentrations of colloid-bound C, Si and Al were measured in the filtrates and, as a reference, in centrifugates of the suspensions. To exclude the influence of the filter cake and examine only pore clogging effects, we conducted the same filtration experiment with suspensions which have been pre-treated by a centrifugal elimination of particles 〉3μm. Finally, we scanned a membrane after filtration with an electron microscope for the visualisation of possible pore clogging. Turbidity and concentrations of colloid-bound Al and Si in the filtrates of the pre-treated suspensions were one order of magnitude lower than in centrifugates. This discrepancy was most pronounced for M suspensions which indicates that filters preferentially remove mineral colloids. Microscope images revealed no sign for pore clogging and smaller filtrated suspension volumes did not lead to more colloid recovery in pre-treated filtrates. We assume that the colloids are retained within the thick, multilayered structure of the filter without clogging the main pores. When filter cakes are forming (experiment without previous centrifugation), turbidity and concentrations of colloid-bound Al, Si and C decrease with increasing filtration volume. However, the retaining effect of filter cakes seems negligible compared to the retaining effect within the filter. We conclude that the composition of soil colloidal suspensions depends significantly on the technique which is used to remove larger particles. Filtration underestimates the amount of colloids in suspension and centrifugation should be preferred as separation method at least for soils with colloids of similar density, either M or O. ; p. 35-40.
    Keywords: Colloids ; Filtrates ; Centrifugation ; Filtration ; Aluminum ; Turbidity ; Soil Colloids ; Silicon ; Filter Cake ; Soil
    ISSN: 0927-7757
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Science of the Total Environment, 01 December 2015, Vol.535, pp.3-19
    Description: Engineered inorganic nanoparticles (EINP) from consumers' products and industrial applications, especially silver and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NP), are emitted into the aquatic and terrestrial environments in increasing amounts. However, the current knowledge on their environmental fate and biological effects is diverse and renders reliable predictions complicated. This review critically evaluates existing knowledge on colloidal aging mechanisms, biological functioning and transport of Ag NP and TiO NP in water and soil and it discusses challenges for concepts, experimental approaches and analytical methods in order to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the processes linking NP fate and effects. Ag NP undergo dissolution and oxidation with Ag S as a thermodynamically determined endpoint. Nonetheless, Ag NP also undergo colloidal transformations in the nanoparticulate state and may act as carriers for other substances. Ag NP and TiO NP can have adverse biological effects on organisms. Whereas Ag NP reveal higher colloidal stability and mobility, the efficiency of NOM as a stabilizing agent is greater towards TiO NP than towards Ag NP, and multivalent cations can dominate the colloidal behavior over NOM. Many of the past analytical obstacles have been overcome just recently. Single particle ICP-MS based methods in combination with field flow fractionation techniques and hydrodynamic chromatography have the potential to fill the gaps currently hampering a comprehensive understanding of fate and effects also at a low field relevant concentrations. These analytical developments will allow for mechanistically orientated research and transfer to a larger set of EINP. This includes separating processes driven by NP specific properties and bulk chemical properties, categorization of effect-triggering pathways directing the EINP effects towards specific recipients, and identification of dominant environmental parameters triggering fate and effect of EINP in specific ecosystems (e.g. soil, lake, or riverine systems).
    Keywords: Transport ; Aggregation ; Analytics ; Environment ; Aging ; Ecotoxicology ; Environmental Sciences ; Biology ; Public Health
    ISSN: 0048-9697
    E-ISSN: 1879-1026
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Plant and Soil, 2018, Vol.427(1), pp.71-86
    Description: Background and aims Nanoparticles and colloids affect the mobilisation and availability of phosphorus for plants and microorganisms in soils. We aimed to give a description of colloid sizes and composition from forest soil profiles and to evaluate the size-related quality of colloids for P fixation. Methods We investigated the size-dependent elemental composition and the P content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) isolated from five German (beech-dominated) forest soil profiles of varying bulk soil P content by field-flow fractionation (FFF) coupled to various detectors. Results Three size fractions of WDC were separated: (i) nanoparticles 25 nm (NP) rich in C.sub.org, (ii) fine colloids (25 nm-240 nm; FC) composed mainly of C.sub.org, Fe and Al, probably as associations of Fe- and Al- (hydr)oxides and organic matter, and (iii) medium-sized colloids (240 nm-500 nm; MC), rich in Fe, Al and Si, indicating the presence of phyllosilicates. The P concentration in the overall WDC was up to 16 times higher compared to the bulk soil. The NP content decreased with increasing soil depth while the FC and MC showed a local maximum in the mineral topsoil due to soil acidification, although variant distributions in the subsoil were observed. NP were of great relevance for P binding in the organic surface layers, whereas FC- and MC-associated P dominated in the Ah horizon. Conclusion The nanoparticles and colloids appeared to be of high relevance as P carriers in the forest surface soils studied, regardless of the bulk soil P content.
    Keywords: Colloids ; Field-flow fractionation ; Forest soil ; Nanoparticles ; Phosphorus
    ISSN: 0032-079X
    E-ISSN: 1573-5036
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Chemistry, 2014, Vol.11(6), p.709-718
    Description:  The supramolecular structure and resulting physicochemical properties of soil organic matter (SOM) significantly control storage and buffer functions of soils, e.g. for nutrients, organic molecules and water. Multivalent cations, able to form complexes, are suggested to form inter- and intramolecular cross-links in SOM. At present, specific effects of the valence and type of cation on SOM properties are incompletely understood. We investigated changes in SOM interfacial properties, its ability to release mobile colloids in aqueous solutions and its sorption affinity towards organic chemicals in dependence on cation–SOM interactions, temperature and aging time.
    Keywords: colloids; contact angle; sorption; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.
    ISSN: 1448-2517
    E-ISSN: 1449-8979
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of environmental quality, 2009, Vol.38(3), pp.933-9
    Description: Liming is a common technique suggested for the stabilization of shooting range sites. We investigated the effect of an increase in pH on the mobilization of soluble and dispersible (colloidal) Pb, As, and Sb. Our hypothesis was that the addition of divalent cations counteracts the pH-induced mobilization of soluble and colloidal metal(loid)s. We determined soluble (operationally defined as the fraction 〈 10 nm obtained after centrifugation) and dispersible (filter cut-off 1200 nm) As, Pb, Sb, Fe, and C(org) concentrations in the filtered suspensions of batch extracts of topsoil samples (C(org): 8%) from a former shooting range site following a pH increase to values between 3.5 and 7 by adding a monovalent (KOH) or a divalent (Ca(OH)(2)) base. In the Ca(OH)(2)-treated samples, dissolved metal(loid) concentrations were 62 to 98% lower than those titrated with KOH to similar pH. Similarly, Ca reduced the concentration of dispersible Pb by 95%, but had little or no impact on dispersible As and Sb. We conclude that the counterion valency controls the mobility of metal(loid)s by affecting the mobility and sorption capacity of the sorbents (e.g., colloids, organic matter).
    Keywords: Antimony -- Chemistry ; Arsenic -- Chemistry ; Cations, Divalent -- Chemistry ; Lead -- Chemistry ; Soil -- Analysis
    ISSN: 0047-2425
    E-ISSN: 15372537
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Journal of environmental quality, 2007, Vol.36(4), pp.1187-93
    Description: Drying of soil may increase the hydrophobicity of soil and affect the mobilization of colloids after re-wetting. Results of previous research suggest that colloid hydrophobicity is an important parameter in controlling the retention of colloids and colloid-associated substances in soils. We tested the hypothesis that air-drying of soil samples increases the hydrophobicity of water-dispersible colloids and whether air-drying affects the mobilization of colloid-associated heavy metals. We performed batch experiments with field-moist and air-dried (25 degrees C) soils from a former sewage farm (sandy loam), a municipal park (loamy sand), and a shooting range site (loamy sand with 25% C(org)). The filtered suspensions (〈1.2 microm) were analyzed for concentrations of dissolved and colloidal organic C and heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn), average colloid size, zeta potential, and turbidity. The hydrophobicity of colloids was determined by their partitioning between a hydrophobic solid and a hydrophilic aqueous phase. Drying increased hydrophobicity of the solid phase but did not affect the hydrophobicity of the dispersed colloids. Drying decreased the amount of mobilized mineral and (organo-)mineral colloids in the sewage farm soils but increased the mobilization of organic colloids in the C-rich shooting range soil. Dried samples released less colloid-bound Cd and Zn than field-moist samples. Drying-induced mobilization of dissolved organic C caused a redistribution of Cu from the colloidal to the dissolved phase. We conclude that drying-induced colloid mobilization is not caused by a change in the physicochemical properties of the colloids. Therefore, it is likely that the mobilization of colloids in the field is caused by increasing shear forces or the disintegration of aggregates.
    Keywords: Desiccation ; Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions ; Colloids -- Chemistry ; Metals, Heavy -- Analysis ; Soil -- Analysis
    ISSN: 0047-2425
    E-ISSN: 15372537
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Soil Science Society of America journal, 2008, Vol.72(6), pp.1694-1707
    Description: Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) relaxometry has been used to analyze pore size distributions of wet porous samples. To make this method applicable to soil samples, knowledge about contribution from the soil solution to the total proton relaxation is needed. We extracted soil solutions from nine soil samples and determined transverse proton relaxation rates, the concentration of Fe, Mn, and total organic C (TOC), and the pH of the solutions. The effects of Fe, Mn, and TOC on the proton relaxation in the soil solution were compared with those of dissolved Fe2+, Fe3+, and Mn2+ and of glucose, D-cellobiose, potassium hydrogen phthalate, sodium alginate, and agar in model solutions. Proton relaxation rates in the soil solutions were up to 20 times larger than in pure water, which was mainly due to dissolved Fe(III) and Mn(II) species. The relaxivities of Fe and Mn in soil solution were reduced to 40 and 70% compared with Fe(III) and Mn(II) in a model solution, respectively. Smaller relaxivities were primarily due to the formation of metal-organic complexes. We conclude that the proton relaxation in soil samples is generally accelerated by the soil solution, and its contribution must be considered to estimate pore sizes from relaxation times. By using the calculated relaxivities of Fe and Mn in soil solution, the contribution of the soil solution to the total proton relaxation can be estimated from the Fe and Mn concentration in the soil solution. ; Includes references ; p. 1694-1707.
    Keywords: Soil Organic Carbon ; Goethite ; Cellobiose ; Soil Solution ; Agar ; Soil Pore System ; Manganese ; Ions ; Iron ; Colloids ; Sampling ; Alginates ; Glucose ; Extracts ; Chemical Concentration ; Chemical Composition ; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ; Montmorillonite ; Sodium Alginate ; Pore Size Distribution ; Proton Relaxation ; Potassium Hydrogen Phthalate
    ISSN: 0361-5995
    E-ISSN: 14350661
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