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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: ACS infectious diseases, 11 August 2017, Vol.3(8), pp.595-605
    Description: Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that causes invasive infections in both children and adults. During pregnancy, GBS is a significant cause of infection of the fetal membranes (chorioamnionitis), which can lead to intra-amniotic infection, preterm birth, stillbirth, and neonatal sepsis. Recently, breastfeeding has been thought to represent a potential mode of GBS transmission from mother to newborn, which might increase the risk for late-onset sepsis. Little is known, however, about the molecular components of breast milk that may support or prevent GBS colonization. In this study, we examine how human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) affect the pathogenesis of GBS. HMOs from discrete donor samples were isolated and profiled by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). Growth and biofilm assays show that HMOs from mothers of specific milk groups can modulate the growth and biofilm formation of GBS. High-resolution field-emission gun scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed the quantitative biofilm assays and demonstrated cell arrangement perturbations in bacterial cultures treated with specific oligosaccharides. These findings demonstrate that HMOs affect the growth and cell biology of GBS. Finally, this study provides the first example of HMOs functioning as antibiofilm agents against GBS.
    Keywords: GBS ; Group B Streptococcus ; HMO ; Antibiofilm ; Antimicrobial ; Bacteriostatic ; Human Milk Oligosaccharides ; Anti-Bacterial Agents -- Pharmacology ; Biofilms -- Drug Effects ; Milk, Human -- Chemistry ; Oligosaccharides -- Pharmacology ; Streptococcus Agalactiae -- Drug Effects
    E-ISSN: 2373-8227
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: ACS infectious diseases, 09 March 2018, Vol.4(3), pp.315-324
    Description: In a previous study, we reported that human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) isolated from five donor milk samples possessed antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity against Streptococcus agalactiae, also known as Group B Streptococcus or GBS. Herein, we present a broader evaluation of the antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity by screening HMOs from 14 new donors against three strains of GBS and two of the ESKAPE pathogens of particular interest to child health, Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii. Growth and biofilm assays showed that HMOs from these new donors possessed antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity against all three strains of GBS, antibiofilm activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain USA300, and antimicrobial activity against A. baumannii strain ATCC 19606.
    Keywords: A. baumannii ; GBS ; S. agalactiae ; S. aureus ; Antibiofilm ; Antimicrobial
    E-ISSN: 2373-8227
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  • 3
    In: Journal of Biophotonics, September 2019, Vol.12(9), pp.n/a-n/a
    Description: , also known as Group B (GBS), is a major cause of chorioamnionitis and neonatal sepsis. This study evaluates Raman spectroscopy (RS) to identify spectral characteristics of infection and differentiate GBS from and during ex vivo infection of human fetal membrane tissues. Unique spectral features were identified from colonies grown on agar and infected fetal membrane tissues. Multinomial logistic regression analysis accurately identified GBS infected tissues with 100.0% sensitivity and 88.9% specificity. Together, these findings support further investigation into the use of RS as an emerging microbiologic diagnostic tool and intrapartum screening test for GBS carriage. Current methods to screen Group B (GBS), a major cause of chorioamnionitis and neonatal sepsis, do not provide accurate, sensitive readings. Raman microspectroscopy combined with logistic regression was utilized to investigate a GBS infection model of human fetal membranes ex vivo. Tissue infected with GBS was successfully distinguished from non‐infected, infected, and infected tissue. These findings motivate the development of Raman spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for intrapartum screening of GBS.
    Keywords: Biofilms ; Chorioamnionitis ; Gbs ; Group B Streptococcus ; Raman Spectroscopy ; Streptococcus Agalactiae
    ISSN: 1864-063X
    E-ISSN: 1864-0648
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