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  • Groundwater
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Advances in Water Resources, 2010, Vol.33(11), pp.1291-1295
    Description: Interest in groundwater (GW)-surface water (SW) interactions has grown steadily over the last two decades. New regulations such as the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) now call for a sustainable management of coupled ground- and surface water resources and linked ecosystems. Embracing this mandate requires new interdisciplinary research on GW-SW systems that addresses the linkages between hydrology, biogeochemistry and ecology at nested scales and specifically accounts for small-scale spatial and temporal patterns of GW-SW exchange. Methods to assess these patterns such as the use of natural tracers (e.g. heat) and integrated surface-subsurface numerical models have been refined and enhanced significantly in recent years and have improved our understanding of processes and dynamics. Numerical models are increasingly used to explore hypotheses and to develop new conceptual models of GW-SW interactions. New technologies like distributed temperature sensing (DTS) allow an assessment of process dynamics at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. These developments are reflected in the contributions to this Special Issue on GW-SW interactions. However, challenges remain in transferring process understanding across scales. ►Rapidly growing interest in groundwater-surface water exchange processes. ►Research on groundwater-surface water interactions has become multidisciplinary. ►New focus on linkages between hydrology, biogeochemistry and ecology. ►Development of new methods and models to quantify spatial and temporal patterns. ►Challenges remain in transferring process understanding across scales.
    Keywords: Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions ; River-Aquifer Exchange ; Engineering
    ISSN: 0309-1708
    E-ISSN: 1872-9657
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Hydrology, October 2015, Vol.529, pp.969-979
    Description: Coupling surface and subsurface water flow in fully integrated hydrological codes is becoming common in hydrological research; however, the coupling of surface–subsurface solute transport has received much less attention. Previous studies on fully integrated solute transport focus on small scales, simple geometric domains, and have not utilised many different field data sources. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the inclusion of both flow and solute transport in a 3D, fully integrated catchment model, utilising high resolution observations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export from a wetland complex during a rainfall event. A sensitivity analysis is performed to span a range of transport conditions for the surface–subsurface boundary (e.g. advective exchange only, advection plus diffusion, advection plus full mechanical dispersion) and subsurface dispersivities. The catchment model captures some aspects of observed catchment behaviour (e.g. solute discharge at the catchment outlet, increasing discharge from wetlands with increased stream discharge, and counter-clockwise concentration–discharge relationships), although other known behaviours are not well represented in the model (e.g. slope of concentration–discharge plots). Including surface–subsurface solute transport aids in evaluating internal model processes, however there are challenges related to the influence of dispersion across the surface–subsurface interface, and non-uniqueness of the solute transport solution. This highlights that obtaining solute field data is especially important for constraining integrated models of solute transport.
    Keywords: Solute Transport ; Surface–Subsurface Coupling ; Integrated Modelling ; Catchment Modelling ; Geography
    ISSN: 0022-1694
    E-ISSN: 1879-2707
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of hydrology, 2012, Vol.475, pp.1-11
    Description: The hyporheic zone is strongly influenced by the adjacent surface water and groundwater systems. It is subject to hydraulic head and pressure fluctuations at different space and time scales, causing dynamic and heterogeneous flow patterns. These patterns are crucial for many biogeochemical processes in the shallow sediment and need to be considered in investigations of this hydraulically dynamic and biogeochemical active interface. For this purpose a device employing heat as an artificial tracer and a data analysis routine were developed. The method aims at measuring hyporheic flow direction and velocity in three dimensions at a scale of a few centimeters. A short heat pulse is injected into the sediment by a point source and its propagation is detected by up to 24temperature sensors arranged cylindrically around the heater. The resulting breakthrough curves are analyzed using an analytical solution of the heat transport equation. The device was tested in two laboratory flow-through tanks with defined flow velocities and directions. Using different flow situations and sensor arrays the sensitivity of the method was evaluated. After operational reliability was demonstrated in the laboratory, its applicability in the field was tested in the hyporheic zone of a low gradient stream with sandy streambed in NE-Germany. Median and maximum flow velocity in the hyporheic zone at the site were determined as 0.9×10⁻⁴ and 2.1×10⁻⁴ms⁻¹ respectively. Horizontal flow components were found to be spatially very heterogeneous, while vertical flow component appear to be predominantly driven by the streambed morphology. ; p. 1-11.
    Keywords: Groundwater ; Labeling Techniques ; Space And Time ; Sediments ; Surface Water ; Streams ; Algorithms ; Field Experimentation ; Heat ; Heaters ; Tanks
    ISSN: 0022-1694
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Hydrology, 19 December 2012, Vol.475, pp.1-11
    Description: ► We developed a method to determine flow direction and velocity in the hyporheic zone. ► The method is based on a heat pulse technique with analytical data analysis algorithm. ► Error-proneness and accuracy of the method were assessed in the lab and . ► The first field application gives insight in hyporheic flow patterns of a lowland river. The hyporheic zone is strongly influenced by the adjacent surface water and groundwater systems. It is subject to hydraulic head and pressure fluctuations at different space and time scales, causing dynamic and heterogeneous flow patterns. These patterns are crucial for many biogeochemical processes in the shallow sediment and need to be considered in investigations of this hydraulically dynamic and biogeochemical active interface. For this purpose a device employing heat as an artificial tracer and a data analysis routine were developed. The method aims at measuring hyporheic flow direction and velocity in three dimensions at a scale of a few centimeters. A short heat pulse is injected into the sediment by a point source and its propagation is detected by up to 24 temperature sensors arranged cylindrically around the heater. The resulting breakthrough curves are analyzed using an analytical solution of the heat transport equation. The device was tested in two laboratory flow-through tanks with defined flow velocities and directions. Using different flow situations and sensor arrays the sensitivity of the method was evaluated. After operational reliability was demonstrated in the laboratory, its applicability in the field was tested in the hyporheic zone of a low gradient stream with sandy streambed in NE-Germany. Median and maximum flow velocity in the hyporheic zone at the site were determined as 0.9 × 10 and 2.1 × 10 m s respectively. Horizontal flow components were found to be spatially very heterogeneous, while vertical flow component appear to be predominantly driven by the streambed morphology.
    Keywords: Flow Patterns ; Flow Direction ; Flow Velocity ; Hyporheic Zone ; Heat Pulse Technique ; Geography
    ISSN: 0022-1694
    E-ISSN: 1879-2707
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Water Research, 01 March 2018, Vol.130, pp.185-199
    Description: Nitrate contamination in ground- and surface water is a persistent problem in countries with intense agriculture. The transition zone between rivers and their riparian aquifers, where river water and groundwater interact, may play an important role in mediating nitrate exports, as it can facilitate intensive denitrification, which permanently removes nitrate from the aquatic system. However, the in-situ factors controlling riparian denitrification are not fully understood, as they are often strongly linked and their effects superimpose each other. In this study, we present the evaluation of hydrochemical and isotopic data from a 2-year sampling period of river water and groundwater in the riparian zone along a 3rd order river in Central Germany. Based on bi- and multivariate statistics (Spearman's rank correlation and partial least squares regression) we can show, that highest rates for oxygen consumption and denitrification in the riparian aquifer occur where the fraction of infiltrated river water and at the same time groundwater temperature, are high. River discharge and depth to groundwater are additional explanatory variables for those reaction rates, but of minor importance. Our data and analyses suggest that at locations in the riparian aquifer, which show significant river water infiltration, heterotrophic microbial reactions in the riparian zone may be fueled by bioavailable organic carbon derived from the river water. We conclude that interactions between rivers and riparian groundwater are likely to be a key control of nitrate removal and should be considered as a measure to mitigate high nitrate exports from agricultural catchments.
    Keywords: Riparian Zone ; Nitrate Contamination ; Nitrate Stable Isotopes ; River-Groundwater Interaction ; Denitrification ; Engineering
    ISSN: 0043-1354
    E-ISSN: 1879-2448
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Hydrology, 13 February 2014, Vol.509, pp.601-614
    Description: An important prerequisite to better understand the transport of nutrients and contaminants across the river-aquifer interface and possible implications for biogeochemical transformations is to accurately characterize and asses the exchange fluxes. In this study we investigate how monsoonal precipitation events and the resulting variability in river discharge affect the dynamics of river-aquifer exchange and the corresponding flux rates. We evaluate potential impacts of the investigated exchange fluxes on local water quality. Hydraulic gradients along a piezometer transect were monitored at a river reach in a small catchment in South Korea, where the hydrologic dynamics are driven by the East-Asian Monsoon. We used heat as a tracer to constrain river-aquifer exchange fluxes in a two-dimensional flow and heat transport model implemented in the numerical code HydroGeoSphere, which was calibrated to the measured temperature and total head data. To elucidate potential effects of river-aquifer exchange dynamics on biogeochemical transformations at the river-aquifer interface, river water and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrate (NO ) and dissolved oxygen saturation (DO ). Our results illustrate highly variable hydrologic conditions during the monsoon season characterized by temporal and spatial variability in river-aquifer exchange fluxes with frequent flow reversals (changes between gaining and losing conditions). Intense monsoonal precipitation events and the associated rapid changes in river stage are the dominant driver for the observed riverbed flow reversals. The chemical data suggest that the flow reversals, when river water high in DOC is pushed into the nitrate-rich groundwater below the stream and subsequently returns to the stream may facilitate and enhance the natural attenuation of nitrate in the shallow groundwater.
    Keywords: River-Aquifer Exchange Fluxes ; Heat As a Natural Tracer ; Monsoonal-Type Climate ; Hydraulic Gradient Reversals ; Hydrogeosphere ; Natural Attenuation of Nitrate ; Geography
    ISSN: 0022-1694
    E-ISSN: 1879-2707
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  • 7
    In: Hydrological Processes, 30 October 2013, Vol.27(22), pp.3240-3253
    Description: Exchange of groundwater and lake water with typically quite different chemical composition is an important driver for biogeochemical processes at the groundwater‐lake interface, which can affect the water quality of lakes. This is of particular relevance in mine lakes where anoxic and slightly acidic groundwater mixes with oxic and acidic lake water (pH 330 nmol g d) compared to alternating sites (〈220 nmol g d). Although differences in sulfate reduction rates could not be explained solely by different flux rates, they were clearly related to the prevailing groundwater‐lake exchange patterns and the associated pH conditions. Our findings strongly suggest that groundwater‐lake exchange has significant effects on the biogeochemical processes that are coupled to sulfate reduction such as acidity retention and precipitation of iron sulfides. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Keywords: Groundwater‐Lake Exchange ; Acid Mine Lake ; Seepage Flux ; Ph‐Profiles ; Chloride Profiles ; Acid Neutralization Processes
    ISSN: 0885-6087
    E-ISSN: 1099-1085
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  • 8
    In: Water Resources Research, January 2017, Vol.53(1), pp.779-798
    Description: In this study, we investigate the impact of single stream discharge events on water exchange, solute transport, and reactions in the hyporheic zone below a natural in‐stream gravel bar. We set up a reactive transport groundwater model with streamflow scenarios that vary by event duration and peak discharge. A steady ambient groundwater flow field is assumed that results in losing, neutral, or gaining stream conditions depending on the stream stage. Across the streambed dissolved oxygen, organic carbon, and nitrate are transported into the subsurface. Additional nitrate is received from upwelling groundwater. Aerobic respiration and denitrification are simulated for scenarios with different stream solute concentrations. Results show that hyporheic exchange flux, solute transport, and consumption increase during events. However, their intensities depend highly on the interplay between event characteristics and ambient groundwater conditions. During events where reversals in the hydraulic gradient occur stream water and solutes infiltrate deeper into the aquifer where they have more time to react. For those events, the reactive efficiency of the hyporheic zone (solute consumption as fraction of influx) for aerobic respiration and denitrification is up to 2.7 and 10 times higher compared to base flow conditions. The fraction of stream nitrate load consumed in the hyporheic zone increases with stream discharge (up to 150 mg/m/h), but remains below the value under base flow conditions for weak events. Events also increase denitrification of groundwater borne nitrate, but groundwater nitrate flux to the stream decreases by up to 33% due to temporary gradient reversals. Transient reactive transport groundwater model of the hyporheic zone for various single discharge events Aerobic respiration and denitrification occur at different timing and locations in the hyporheic zone Reversal in hydraulic gradient direction (gaining to neutral to losing) significantly increases reactive efficiency
    Keywords: Hyporheic Zone ; Discharge Events ; Transient Groundwater Model ; Reactive Transport ; Denitrification
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
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  • 9
    In: Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, May 2014, Vol.119(5), pp.910-928
    Description: At the interface between stream water, groundwater, and the hyporheic zone (HZ), important biogeochemical processes that play a crucial role in fluvial ecology occur. Solutes that infiltrate into the HZ can react with each other and possibly also with upwelling solutes from the groundwater. In this study, we systematically evaluate how variations of gaining and losing conditions, stream discharge, and pool‐riffle morphology affect aerobic respiration (AR) and denitrification (DN) in the HZ. For this purpose, a computational fluid dynamics model of stream water flow is coupled to a reactive transport model. Scenarios of variations of the solute concentration in the upwelling groundwater were conducted. Our results show that solute influx, residence time, and the size of reactive zones strongly depend on presence, magnitude, and direction of ambient groundwater flow. High magnitudes of ambient groundwater flow lower AR efficiency by up to 4 times and DN by up to 3 orders of magnitude, compared to neutral conditions. The influence of stream discharge and morphology on the efficiency of AR and DN are minor, in comparison to that of ambient groundwater flow. Different scenarios of O and NO concentrations in the upwelling groundwater reveal that DN efficiency of the HZ is highest under low upwelling magnitudes accompanied with low concentrations of O and NO. Our results demonstrate how ambient groundwater flow influences solute transport, AR, and DN in the HZ. Neglecting groundwater flow in stream‐groundwater interactions would lead to a significant overestimation of the efficiency of biogeochemical reactions in fluvial systems. Coupling of CFD model to reactive transport model Losing and gaining conditions reduce aerobic respiration and denitrification HZ has higher potential for aerobic respiration compared to denitrification
    Keywords: Hyporheic Zone ; Pool‐Riffle ; Streambed ; Reactive Transport Modeling ; Denitrification
    ISSN: 2169-8953
    E-ISSN: 2169-8961
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  • 10
    In: Water Resources Research, September 2013, Vol.49(9), pp.5834-5850
    Description: Exchange of water and solutes across the stream‐sediment interface is an important control for biogeochemical transformations in the hyporheic zone (HZ). In this paper, we investigate the interplay between turbulent stream flow and HZ flow in pool‐riffle streams under various ambient groundwater flow conditions. Streambed pressures, derived from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, are assigned at the top of the groundwater model, and fluxes at the bottom of the groundwater model domain represent losing and gaining conditions. Simulations for different Reynolds numbers () and pool‐riffle morphologies are performed. Results show increasing hyporheic exchange flows (m/d) for larger and a concurrent decrease in residence time (RT). Losing and gaining conditions were found to significantly affect the hyporheic flow field and diminish its spatial extent as well as rates of hyporheic exchange flow. The fraction of stream water circulating through the hyporheic zone is in the range of 1 × 10 to 1 × 10 per meter stream length, decreasing with increasing discharge. Complex distributions of pressure across the streambed cause significant lateral hyporheic flow components with a mean lateral travel distance of 20% of the longitudinal flow paths length. We found that the relationship between pool‐riffle height and hyporheic exchange flow is characterized by a threshold in pool‐riffle amplitude, beyond which hyporheic exchange flow becomes independent of riffle height. Hyporheic residence time distributions (RTD) are log‐normally distributed with medians ranging between 0.7 and 19 h. ambient groundwater flow significantly influences HZ exchange and 3D flow paths undular hydraulic jumps affect streambed pressures and bedform driven exchange threshold in pool riffle height, HZ exchange is independent of riffle height
    Keywords: Hyporheic Exchange ; Computational Fluid Dynamics ; Groundwater‐Surface Water Exchange ; Pool‐Riffle ; Residence Times ; Undular Hydraulic Jump
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
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