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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, August 2016, Vol.179(4), pp.443-453
    Description: Phosphorus (P) is essential for sustainable forest growth, yet the impact of anthropogenic impacts on P leaching losses from forest soils is hardly known. We conducted an irrigation experiment with 128 mesocosms from three forest sites representing a gradient of resin extractable P of the A‐horizon. On each site we selected a and a managed subsite. We simulated ambient rain (AR), anthropogenic nitrogen input (NI) of 100 kg (ha · a) and forest liming (FL) with a dolomite input of 0.3 Mg (ha · a). Soil solution was extracted from the organic layer, 10 cm depth and 20 cm depth of the mesocosms, and analyzed for molybdate reactive phosphorus (MRP) and molybdate unreactive phosphorus (MUP). Additionally, we separated colloids from the soil solution using Asymmetric Field Flow Fractionation for assessing the colloidal fraction of total element concentrations. NI increased MRP and MUP concentrations for all plots with one exception, while FL decreased MRP and MUP with the exception of another plot. While the irrigation treatments had little impact on the P‐richest site, MRP and MUP concentrations changed strongly at the poorer sites. The colloidal fraction of P in the soil solution equaled 38–47% of the total P load. Nitrogen input and liming also affected the Fe, Al, Ca, and Corg contents of the colloidal fraction.
    Keywords: Phosphorus ; Mesocosm ; Random Forest Modelling ; Molybdate ; Soil Colloids
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in Plant Science, 01 March 2019, Vol.10
    Description: In response to a wide-spread decline in forest vitality associated with acid rain in the 1980s, liming of soils has been implemented in many federal states in Germany to buffer further acid deposition and improve availability of nutrients such...
    Keywords: Norway Spruce ; Liming ; Drought Tolerance ; Resistance ; Resilience ; Botany
    E-ISSN: 1664-462X
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  • 3
    In: Frontiers in Plant Science, 2019, Vol.10
    Description: In response to a wide-spread decline in forest vitality associated with acid rain in the 1980s, liming of soils has been implemented in many federal states in Germany to buffer further acid deposition and improve availability of nutrients such as calcium and magnesium. As a consequence, it may also increase vitality and depth of fine-root systems and hence improve the drought tolerance of species such as Norway spruce [ Picea abies (L.) Karst.], which occurs mostly on acidic forest soils. However, the influence of repeated liming on drought tolerance of trees has never been studied. Here we compared the resistance, recovery and resilience of radial growth in P. abies in relation to drought in limed and control stands and assessed how the dosage and interval between lime application and drought year influences the radial growth response of P. abies . We analyzed radial growth in 198 P. abies trees of six experimental sites in south–west Germany. An analysis of the radial increment over the last 30 years allowed the analysis of drought events shortly after the first liming (short-term effect) as well as posterior drought events (mid- to long-term effects). Generalized linear models were developed to assess the influence of drought intensity, site and period since first liming on the drought tolerance of Norway spruce. Regardless of drought intensity, there was no general increase in drought resistance of Norway spruce in response to liming. However, drought resistance of radial growth improved on a loamy site that was additionally treated with wood ash 30 years after the first lime application. Furthermore, recovery and resilience of radial growth after severe drought events were generally better in spruce trees of limed treatments. This indicates a shorter stress period in spruce trees growing on limed soil, which may reduce their susceptibility to secondary, drought-related pests and pathogens.
    Keywords: Plant Science ; Norway Spruce ; Liming ; Drought Tolerance ; Resistance ; Resilience
    E-ISSN: 1664-462X
    Source: U.S. National Library of Medicine (NIH/NLM)
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