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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • Neoplasms  (7)
  • Cytomegalovirus
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Medical Microbiology and Immunology, 2011, Vol.200(1), pp.1-5
    Description: The question whether human cytomegalovirus may affect cancer diseases has been discussed (very controversially) for decades. There are convinced believers and strict opponents of the idea that HCMV might be able to play a role in the course of cancer diseases. In parallel, the number of published reports on the topic is growing. Recently published and presented (Ranganathan P, Clark P, Kuo JS, Salamat S, Kalejta RF. A Survey of Human Cytomegalovirus Genomic Loci Present in Glioblastoma Multiforme Tissue Samples. 35th Annual International Herpes Workshop, Salt Lake City, 2010) data on HCMV detection in glioblastoma tissues and colocalisation of HCMV proteins with cellular proteins known to be relevant for glioblastoma progression motivated us to recapitulate the current state of evidence.
    Keywords: Cytomegalovirus ; Cancer ; Oncomodulation ; Tumour virus ; Glioblastoma ; Neuroblastoma
    ISSN: 0300-8584
    E-ISSN: 1432-1831
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Medical Microbiology and Immunology, 2009, Vol.198(2), pp.79-81
    Description: The (possible) relationship between HCMV and cancer has been discussed for decades. Detection of viral DNA, mRNA and/or antigens in tumour tissues as well as seroepidemiologic evidence suggested a role of HCMV infection in several human malignancies. However, controversial clinical results from diVerent groups had raised skepticism about a role of HCMV in cancer.
    Keywords: Cytomegalovirus–Physiology ; Cytomegalovirus Infections–Complications ; Humans–Etiology ; Neoplasms–Virology ; Neoplasms–Virology ; Infections ; Viruses ; Cancer ; Pathology;
    ISSN: 0300-8584
    E-ISSN: 1432-1831
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.), January 2009, Vol.11(1), pp.1-9
    Description: Although human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is generally not regarded to be an oncogenic virus, HCMV infection has been implicated in malignant diseases from different cancer entities. On the basis of our experimental findings, we developed the concept of "oncomodulation" to better explain the role of HCMV in cancer. Oncomodulation means that HCMV infects tumor cells and increases their malignancy. By this concept, HCMV was proposed to be a therapeutic target in a fraction of cancer patients. However, the clinical relevance of HCMV-induced oncomodulation remains to be clarified. One central question that has to be definitively answered is if HCMV establishes persistent virus replication in tumor cells or not. In our eyes, recent clinical findings from different groups in glioblastoma patients and especially the detection of a correlation between the numbers of HCMV-infected glioblastoma cells and tumor stage (malignancy) strongly increase the evidence that HCMV may exert oncomodulatory effects. Here, we summarize the currently available knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that may contribute to oncomodulation by HCMV as well as the clinical findings that suggest that a fraction of tumors from different entities is indeed infected with HCMV.
    Keywords: Cytomegalovirus -- Physiology ; Neoplasms -- Etiology
    E-ISSN: 1476-5586
    Source: MEDLINE/PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine)
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Trends in Molecular Medicine, 2004, Vol.10(1), pp.19-23
    Description: Recently, the term oncomodulation has been proposed to express the ability of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) to modify tumor cell biology, a phenomenon that is independent from transformation. Because past studies have failed to show that HCMV can transform normal human cells, HCMV has not been regarded as an oncogenic tumor virus. However, recent investigations have revealed a high frequency of HCMV in tumor cells of malignancies such as colon cancer, malignant glioma, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and carcinoma. Data from experiments with HCMV-infected tumor cell lines have highlighted the oncomodulatory potential of HCMV and provided important insights into the patho- mechanisms associated with aberrant signaling pathways and transcription factor and/or tumor suppressor function of the host cell.
    Keywords: Medicine ; Biology
    ISSN: 1471-4914
    E-ISSN: 1471-499X
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Neoplasia, July 2004, Vol.6(4), pp.323-331
    Description: Pathologic data indicate that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection might be associated with the pathogenesis of several human malignancies. However, no definitive evidence of a causal link between HCMV infection and cancer dissemination has been established to date. This study describes the modulation of the invasive behavior of NCAM-expressing tumor cell lines by HCMV. Neuroblastoma (NB) cells, persistently infected with the HCMV strain AD169 (UKF-NB-4 and MHH-NB-11 ), were added to endothelial cell monolayers and adhesion and penetration kinetics were measured. The 140- and 180-kDa isoforms of the adhesion receptor NCAM were evaluated by flow cytometry, Western blot, and reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The relevance of NCAM for tumor cell binding was proven by treating NB with NCAM antisense oligonucleotides or NCAM transfection. HCMV infection profoundly increased the number of adherent and penetrated NB, compared to controls. Surface expression of NCAM was significantly lower on UKF-NB-4 and MHH-NB-11 , compared to mock-infected cells. Western-blot and RT-PCR demonstrated reduced protein and RNA levels of the 140- and 180-kDa isoform. An inverse correlation between NCAM expression and adhesion capacity of NB has been shown by antisense and transfection experiments. We conclude that HCMV infection leads to downregulation of NCAM receptors, which is associated with enhanced tumor cell invasiveness.
    Keywords: Hcmv ; Ncam ; Tumor Dissemination ; N-Myc ; P73 ; Medicine
    ISSN: 1476-5586
    ISSN: 15228002
    E-ISSN: 1476-5586
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Medicinal Research Reviews, March 2005, Vol.25(2), pp.167-185
    Description: It has been known for a long time that cytomegalovirus (CMV) has evolved mechanisms that allow the escape from the host immune surveillance. In the past, many efforts have been done to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this virus‐mediated immune escape and thus virus persistence. However, it is unknown, whether CMV may also impair immune responses directed against tumor cells. This might have severe consequences on tumor progression and may explain the growing evidence for CMV‐mediated oncomodulation. This review summarizes recent work on CMV‐mediated immune escape mechanisms of tumor cells and oncomodulation and proposes novel aspects that may be important for understanding the CMV‐associated tumor progression. © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Keywords: Human Cytomegalovirus Hcmv ; Oncomodulation ; Tumor ; Dna‐Virus ; Apoptosis ; Angiogenesis
    ISSN: 0198-6325
    E-ISSN: 1098-1128
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  • 7
    In: FEMS Microbiology Reviews, February 2004, Vol.28(1), pp.59-77
    Description: A high frequency of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome and antigens in tumor samples of patients with different malignancies is now well documented, although the causative role for HCMV in the development of the neoplasias remains to be established. HCMV infection can modulate multiple cellular regulatory and signalling pathways in a manner similar to that of oncoproteins of small DNA tumor viruses such as human papilloma virus or adenoviruses. However, in contrast to these DNA tumor viruses, HCMV infection fails to transform susceptible normal human cells. There is now growing evidence that tumor cells with disrupted regulatory and signalling pathways enable HCMV to modulate their properties including stimulation of cell proliferation, survival, invasion, production of angiogenic factors, and immunogenic properties. In contrast to previously suggested “hit and run” transformation we suggest that persistence in tumor cells is essential for HCMV to fully express its oncomodulatory effects. These effects are observed particularly in persistent HCMV infection and are mediated mainly by activity of HCMV regulatory proteins. In persistently HCMV‐infected tumor cell lines – a selection of novel, slowly growing virus variants with changes in coding sequences for virus regulatory proteins takes place. As a result, oncomodulatory effects of HCMV infection may lead to a shift to more malignant phenotype of tumor cells contributing to tumor progression.
    Keywords: Human Cytomegalovirus ; Oncomodulation ; Tumor ; Dna‐Virus ; Apoptosis ; Angiogenesis
    ISSN: 0168-6445
    E-ISSN: 1574-6976
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