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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • Oncomodulation  (6)
  • Cytomegalovirus
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, 2011, Vol.68(6), pp.1079-1090
    Description: Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. Here, non-toxic concentrations of the anti-cancer kinase inhibitor sorafenib were shown to inhibit replication of different HCMV strains (including a ganciclovir-resistant strain) in different cell types. In contrast to established anti-HCMV drugs, sorafenib inhibited HCMV major immediate early promoter activity and HCMV immediate early antigen (IEA) expression. Sorafenib is known to inhibit Raf. Comparison of sorafenib with the MEK inhibitor U0126 suggested that sorafenib inhibits HCMV IEA expression through inhibition of Raf but independently of signaling through the Raf downstream kinase MEK 1/2. In concordance, siRNA-mediated depletion of Raf but not of MEK-reduced IEA expression. In conclusion, sorafenib diminished HCMV replication in clinically relevant concentrations and inhibited HCMV IEA expression, a pathophysiologically relevant event that is not affected by established anti-HCMV drugs. Moreover, we demonstrated for the first time that Raf activation is involved in HCMV IEA expression.
    Keywords: Human cytomegalovirus ; Sorafenib ; Kinase inhibitor ; Raf ; Immediate early antigen ; Cancer chemotherapy ; Oncomodulation ; Antiviral therapy
    ISSN: 1420-682X
    E-ISSN: 1420-9071
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Medical Microbiology and Immunology, 2011, Vol.200(1), pp.1-5
    Description: The question whether human cytomegalovirus may affect cancer diseases has been discussed (very controversially) for decades. There are convinced believers and strict opponents of the idea that HCMV might be able to play a role in the course of cancer diseases. In parallel, the number of published reports on the topic is growing. Recently published and presented (Ranganathan P, Clark P, Kuo JS, Salamat S, Kalejta RF. A Survey of Human Cytomegalovirus Genomic Loci Present in Glioblastoma Multiforme Tissue Samples. 35th Annual International Herpes Workshop, Salt Lake City, 2010) data on HCMV detection in glioblastoma tissues and colocalisation of HCMV proteins with cellular proteins known to be relevant for glioblastoma progression motivated us to recapitulate the current state of evidence.
    Keywords: Cytomegalovirus ; Cancer ; Oncomodulation ; Tumour virus ; Glioblastoma ; Neuroblastoma
    ISSN: 0300-8584
    E-ISSN: 1432-1831
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  • 3
    In: Neuro-Oncology, 2014, Vol. 16(11), pp.1469-1477
    Description: BACKGROUND: Experimental findings have suggested that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection of tumor cells may exert oncomodulatory effects that enhance tumor malignancy. However, controversial findings have been published on the presence of HCMV in malignant tumors. Here, we present the first study that systematically investigates HCMV infection in human nervous system tumors by highly sensitive immunohistochemistry in correlation with the HCMV serostatus of the patients.METHODS: Immunohistochemical and quantitative PCR-based methods to detect different HCMV antigens and genomic HCMV DNA were optimized prior to the investigation of pathological samples. Moreover, the pathological results were matched with the HCMV serostatus of the patients.RESULTS: HCMV immediate-early, late, and pp65 antigens could be detected in single cells from HCMV strain Hi91-infected UKF-NB-4 neuroblastoma cells after 1:1024 dilution with noninfected UKF-NB-4 cells. Genomic HCMV DNA could be detected in copy numbers as low as 430 copies/mL. However, we did not detect HCMV in tumors from a cohort of 123 glioblastoma, medulloblastoma, or neuroblastoma patients. Notably, we detected nonspecifically positive staining in tumor tissues of HCMV seropositive and seronegative glioblastoma patients. The HCMV serostatus of 67 glioblastoma patients matched the general epidemiological prevalence data for Western countries (72% of female and 57% of male glioblastoma patients were HCMV seropositive). Median survival was not significantly different in HCMV seropositive versus seronegative glioblastoma patients.CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of HCMV-infected tumor cells may be much lower than previously reported based on highly sensitive detection methods.
    Keywords: Cytomegalovirus ; Glioma ; Oncomodulation
    ISSN: 1522-8517
    E-ISSN: 1523-5866
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 2005, Vol.326(2), pp.395-401
    Description: In a model of human neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines persistently infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) we previously showed that persistent HCMV infection is associated with an increased malignant phenotype, enhanced drug resistance, and invasive properties. To gain insights into the mechanisms of increased malignancy we analyzed the global changes in cellular gene expression induced by persistent HCMV infection of human neuroblastoma cells by use of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays (HG-U133A, Affymetrix) and RT-PCR. Comparing the gene expression of different NB cell lines with persistently infected cell sub-lines revealed 11 host cell genes regulated in a similar manner throughout all infected samples. Nine of these 11 genes may contribute to the previously observed changes in malignant phenotype of persistently HCMV infected NB cells by influencing invasive growth, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and proliferation. Thus, this work provides the basis for further functional studies.
    Keywords: Neuroblastoma ; Human Cytomegalovirus ; Microarray Analysis ; Oncomodulation ; Biology ; Chemistry ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0006-291X
    E-ISSN: 1090-2104
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Medicinal Research Reviews, March 2005, Vol.25(2), pp.167-185
    Description: It has been known for a long time that cytomegalovirus (CMV) has evolved mechanisms that allow the escape from the host immune surveillance. In the past, many efforts have been done to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this virus‐mediated immune escape and thus virus persistence. However, it is unknown, whether CMV may also impair immune responses directed against tumor cells. This might have severe consequences on tumor progression and may explain the growing evidence for CMV‐mediated oncomodulation. This review summarizes recent work on CMV‐mediated immune escape mechanisms of tumor cells and oncomodulation and proposes novel aspects that may be important for understanding the CMV‐associated tumor progression. © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Keywords: Human Cytomegalovirus Hcmv ; Oncomodulation ; Tumor ; Dna‐Virus ; Apoptosis ; Angiogenesis
    ISSN: 0198-6325
    E-ISSN: 1098-1128
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  • 6
    In: FEMS Microbiology Reviews, February 2004, Vol.28(1), pp.59-77
    Description: A high frequency of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome and antigens in tumor samples of patients with different malignancies is now well documented, although the causative role for HCMV in the development of the neoplasias remains to be established. HCMV infection can modulate multiple cellular regulatory and signalling pathways in a manner similar to that of oncoproteins of small DNA tumor viruses such as human papilloma virus or adenoviruses. However, in contrast to these DNA tumor viruses, HCMV infection fails to transform susceptible normal human cells. There is now growing evidence that tumor cells with disrupted regulatory and signalling pathways enable HCMV to modulate their properties including stimulation of cell proliferation, survival, invasion, production of angiogenic factors, and immunogenic properties. In contrast to previously suggested “hit and run” transformation we suggest that persistence in tumor cells is essential for HCMV to fully express its oncomodulatory effects. These effects are observed particularly in persistent HCMV infection and are mediated mainly by activity of HCMV regulatory proteins. In persistently HCMV‐infected tumor cell lines – a selection of novel, slowly growing virus variants with changes in coding sequences for virus regulatory proteins takes place. As a result, oncomodulatory effects of HCMV infection may lead to a shift to more malignant phenotype of tumor cells contributing to tumor progression.
    Keywords: Human Cytomegalovirus ; Oncomodulation ; Tumor ; Dna‐Virus ; Apoptosis ; Angiogenesis
    ISSN: 0168-6445
    E-ISSN: 1574-6976
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