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  • 1
    In: Environmental Microbiology, June 2016, Vol.18(6), pp.1988-2000
    Description: Phosphorus () is an important macronutrient for all biota on earth but similarly a finite resource. Microorganisms play on both sides of the fence as they effectively mineralize organic and solubilize precipitated forms of soil phosphorus but conversely also take up and immobilize . Therefore, we analysed the role of microbes in two beech forest soils with high and low content by direct sequencing of metagenomic deoxyribonucleic acid. For inorganic solubilization, a significantly higher microbial potential was detected in the ‐rich soil. This trait especially referred to  olibacter usiatus, likewise one of the dominating species in the data sets. A higher microbial potential for efficient phosphate uptake systems () was detected in the ‐depleted soil. Genes involved in starvation response regulation (, ) were prevalent in both soils. This underlines the importance of effective phosphate (ho) regulon control for microorganisms to use alternative sources during phosphate limitation. Predicted genes were primarily harboured by hizobiales, ctinomycetales and cidobacteriales.
    Keywords: Soil Microbiology – Analysis ; Nucleic Acids – Analysis ; Phosphates – Analysis ; Forest Soils – Analysis ; Soil Phosphorus – Analysis;
    ISSN: 1462-2912
    E-ISSN: 1462-2920
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Plant and Soil, 2018, Vol.432(1), pp.289-301
    Description: The accumulation of organic layers in forests is linked to decreasing nutrient availability. Organic layers might represent a source of phosphorus (P) nutrition of trees in forests. Our aims were i) to test if the fate of P in a tree sapling-soil system differs between nutrient-poor and nutrient-rich sites, and ii) to assess the influence of organic layers on the fate of P in a tree sapling-soil system at either site.We conducted a 33P labeling experiment of mesocosms of beech (Fagus sylvatica) saplings.Recovery of 33P in the organic layer was greater under nutrient-poor than under nutrient-rich conditions likely caused by the abundance of microorganisms and roots. Under nutrient-poor conditions, we found that the mobilization of P followed by efficient uptake promoted tree sapling growth if the organic layer was present. The presence of organic layers did not significantly influence P uptake by beech saplings under nutrient-rich conditions suggesting mechanisms of P mobilization in addition to organic matter mineralization.Our results highlight the importance of organic layers for P nutrition of young beech trees growing on nutrient-poor soils in temperate forest ecosystems. The role of organic layers should be considered for sustainable forest management.
    Keywords: P tracer ; Phosphorus nutrition ; Forest floor ; Soil ; Beech ; Phosphorus uptake
    ISSN: 0032-079X
    E-ISSN: 1573-5036
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Plant and Soil, 2018, Vol.427(1), pp.71-86
    Description: Background and aims Nanoparticles and colloids affect the mobilisation and availability of phosphorus for plants and microorganisms in soils. We aimed to give a description of colloid sizes and composition from forest soil profiles and to evaluate the size-related quality of colloids for P fixation. Methods We investigated the size-dependent elemental composition and the P content of water-dispersible colloids (WDC) isolated from five German (beech-dominated) forest soil profiles of varying bulk soil P content by field-flow fractionation (FFF) coupled to various detectors. Results Three size fractions of WDC were separated: (i) nanoparticles 25 nm (NP) rich in C.sub.org, (ii) fine colloids (25 nm-240 nm; FC) composed mainly of C.sub.org, Fe and Al, probably as associations of Fe- and Al- (hydr)oxides and organic matter, and (iii) medium-sized colloids (240 nm-500 nm; MC), rich in Fe, Al and Si, indicating the presence of phyllosilicates. The P concentration in the overall WDC was up to 16 times higher compared to the bulk soil. The NP content decreased with increasing soil depth while the FC and MC showed a local maximum in the mineral topsoil due to soil acidification, although variant distributions in the subsoil were observed. NP were of great relevance for P binding in the organic surface layers, whereas FC- and MC-associated P dominated in the Ah horizon. Conclusion The nanoparticles and colloids appeared to be of high relevance as P carriers in the forest surface soils studied, regardless of the bulk soil P content.
    Keywords: Colloids ; Field-flow fractionation ; Forest soil ; Nanoparticles ; Phosphorus
    ISSN: 0032-079X
    E-ISSN: 1573-5036
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Microbiological Methods, June 2016, Vol.125, pp.91-97
    Description: Phosphorus (P) is of central importance for cellular life but likewise a limiting macronutrient in numerous environments. Certainly microorganisms have proven their ability to increase the phosphorus bioavailability by mineralization of organic-P and solubilization of inorganic-P. On the other hand they efficiently take up P and compete with other biota for phosphorus. However the actual microbial community that is associated to the turnover of this crucial macronutrient in different ecosystems remains largely anonymous especially taking effects of seasonality and spatial heterogeneity into account. In this study seven oligonucleotide primers are presented which target genes coding for microbial acid and alkaline phosphatases ( , ), phytases ( ), phosphonatases ( ) as well as the quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase ( ) and different P transporters ( , ). Illumina amplicon sequencing of soil genomic DNA underlined the high rate of primer specificity towards the respective target gene which usually ranged between 98% and 100% ( : 87%). As expected the primers amplified genes from a broad diversity of distinct microorganisms. Using DNA from a beech dominated forest soil, the highest microbial diversity was detected for the alkaline phosphatase ( ) gene which was amplified from 15 distinct phyla respectively 81 families. Noteworthy the primers also allowed amplification of from 6 fungal orders. The genes coding for acid phosphatase ( ) and the quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase ( ) were amplified from 20 respectively 17 different microbial orders. In comparison the phytase and phosphonatase ( , ) primers covered 13 bacterial orders from 2 different phyla respectively. Although the amplified microbial diversity was apparently limited both primers reliably detected all orders that contributed to the P turnover in the investigated soil as revealed by a previous metagenomic approach. Genes that code for microbial P transporter ( , ) were amplified from 13 respectively 9 distinct microbial orders. Accordingly the introduced primers represent a valuable tool for further analysis of the microbial community involved in the turnover of phosphorus in soils but most likely also in other environments.
    Keywords: Phosphorus Turnover ; Forest Soil ; Phod ; Phon ; Appa ; Pita ; Psts ; Biology
    ISSN: 0167-7012
    E-ISSN: 1872-8359
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, April 2016, Vol.179(2), pp.129-135
    Description: Phosphorus is one of the major limiting factors of primary productivity in terrestrial ecosystems and, thus, the P demand of plants might be among the most important drivers of soil and ecosystem development. The P cycling in forest ecosystems seems an ideal example to illustrate the concept of ecosystem nutrition. Ecosystem nutrition combines and extents the traditional concepts of nutrient cycling and ecosystem ecology. The major extension is to consider also the loading and unloading of nutrient cycles and the impact of nutrient acquiring and recycling processes on overall ecosystem properties. Ecosystem nutrition aims to integrate nutrient related aspects at different scales and in different ecosystem compartments including all processes, interactions and feedbacks associated with the nutrition of an ecosystem. We review numerous previous studies dealing with P nutrition from this ecosystem nutrition perspective. The available information contributes to the description of basic ecosystem characteristics such as emergence, hierarchy, and robustness. In result, we were able to refine Odum's hypothesis on P nutrition strategies along ecosystem succession to substrate related ecosystem nutrition and development. We hypothesize that at sites rich in mineral‐bound P, plant and microbial communities tend to introduce P from primary minerals into the biogeochemical P cycle (acquiring systems), and hence the tightness of the P cycle is of minor relevance for ecosystem functioning. In contrast, tight P recycling is a crucial emergent property of forest ecosystems established at sites poor in mineral bound P (recycling systems). We conclude that the integration of knowledge on nutrient cycling, soil science, and ecosystem ecology into holistic ecosystem nutrition will provide an entirely new view on soil–plant–microbe interactions.
    Keywords: Ecosystem Properties ; P Recycling ; P Nutrition Strategy ; Forest Nutrition ; P Acquiring
    ISSN: 1436-8730
    E-ISSN: 1522-2624
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Microbiological Methods, September 2016, Vol.128, pp.66-68
    Description: In an inter-laboratory trial, gaseous (“CFE”) and liquid fumigation (“Resin”) based methods for measuring microbial phosphorus (P ) were compared, based on the analysis of soil samples from five forests, which differ in their P stocks. Both methods reliably detected the same P gradient in the different soils. However, when the individual recovery rates of spiked P were taken into account, the “CFE” based methods consistently generated higher P values (factor 2) compared to the “Resin” based approaches.
    Keywords: Microbial Phosphorus ; Microbial Biomass ; Gaseous Fumigation ; Liquid Fumigation ; Forest Soils ; Biology
    ISSN: 0167-7012
    E-ISSN: 1872-8359
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