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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    In: Water Resources Research, May 2014, Vol.50(5), pp.4514-4529
    Description: A major difficulty in modeling multiphase flow in porous media is the emergence of trapped phases. Our experiments demonstrate that gas can be trapped in either single‐pores, multipores, or in large connected networks. These large connected clusters can comprise up to eight grain volumes and can contain up to 50% of the whole trapped gas volume. About 85% of the gas volume is trapped by gas clusters. This variety of possible trapped gas clusters of different shape and volume will lead to a better process understanding of bubble‐mediated mass transfer. Since multipore gas bubbles are in contact with the solid surface through ultrathin adsorbed water films the interfacial area between trapped gas clusters and intergranular capillary water is only about 80% of the total gas surface. We could derive a significant (R = 0.98) linear relationship between the gas‐water‐interface and gas saturation. We found no systematic dependency of the front velocity of the invading water phase in the velocity range from 0.1 to 0.6 cm/min corresponding to capillary numbers from 2 × 10 to 10. Our experimental results indicate that the capillary trapping mechanism is controlled by the local pore structure and local connectivity and not by thermodynamics, i.e., by the minimum of the , at least in the considered velocity range. Consistent with this physical picture is our finding that the trapping frequency (= bubble‐size distribution) reflects the pore size distribution for the whole range of pore radii, i.e., the capillary trapping process is determined by statistics and not by thermodynamics. No systematic dependency of trapping efficiency on capillary number Majority of trapped gas bubbles (85%) are multipore trapped Trapping of gas clusters is determined by statistics and not by thermodynamics
    Keywords: Gas Clusters ; Capillary Trapping ; Interfacial Area
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
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  • 2
    In: Water Resources Research, November 2015, Vol.51(11), pp.9094-9111
    Description: We study the impact of pore structure and surface roughness on capillary trapping of nonwetting gas phase during imbibition with water for capillary numbers between 10 and 5 × 10, within glass beads, natural sands, glass beads monolayers, and 2‐D micromodels. The materials exhibit different roughness of the pore‐solid interface. We found that glass beads and natural sands, which exhibit nearly the same grain size distribution, pore size distribution, and connectivity, showed a significant difference of the trapped gas phase of about 15%. This difference can be explained by the microstructure of the pore‐solid interface. Based on the visualization of the trapping dynamics within glass beads monolayers and 2‐D micromodels, we could show that bypass trapping controls the trapping process in glass beads monolayers, while snap‐off trapping controls the trapping process in 2‐D micromodels. We conclude that these different trapping processes are the reason for the different trapping efficiency, when comparing glass beads packs with natural sand packs. Moreover, for small capillary numbers of 10, we found that the cluster size distribution of trapped gas clusters of all 2‐D and 3‐D porous media can be described by a universal power law behavior predicted from percolation theory. This cannot be expected a priori for 2‐D porous media, because bicontinuity of the two bulk phases is violated. Obviously, bicontinuity holds for the thin‐film water phase and the bulk gas phase. The snap‐off trapping process leads to ordinary bond percolation in front of the advancing bulk water phase and is the reason for the observed universal power law behavior in 2‐D micromodels with rough surfaces. Surface roughness controls capillary trapping efficiency The transition‐zone model can be applied to 2‐D micromodels with rough surfaces The 2‐D and 3‐D porous media belong all to the same universality class
    Keywords: Surface Roughness ; Precursor Thin‐Film Flow ; Snap‐Off Trapping ; Universal Power Law ; Ordinary Bond Percolation
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
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  • 3
    In: Water Resources Research, November 2018, Vol.54(11), pp.9033-9044
    Description: Structural hierarchy is a fundamental characteristic of natural porous media. Yet it provokes one of the grand challenges for the modeling of fluid flow and transport since pore‐scale structures and continuum‐scale domains often coincide independent of the observation scale. Common approaches to represent structural hierarchy build, for example, on a multidomain continuum for transport or on the coupling of the Stokes equations with Darcy's law for fluid flow. These approaches, however, are computationally expensive or introduce empirical parameters that are difficult to derive with independent observations. We present an efficient model for fluid flow based on Darcy's law and the law of Hagen‐Poiseuille that is parameterized based on the explicit pore space morphology obtained, for example, by X‐ray μ‐CT and inherently permits the coupling of pore‐scale and continuum‐scale domain. We used the resulting flow field to predict the transport of solutes via particle tracking across the different domains. Compared to experimental breakthrough data from laboratory‐scale columns with hierarchically structured porosity built from solid glass beads and microporous glass pellets, an excellent agreement was achieved without any calibration. Furthermore, we present different test scenarios to compare the flow fields resulting from the Stokes‐Brinkman equations and our approach to comprehensively illustrate its advantages and limitations. In this way, we could show a striking efficiency and accuracy of our approach that qualifies as general alternative for the modeling of fluid flow and transport in hierarchical porous media, for example, fractured rock or karstic aquifers. A model for the simulation of pore‐scale and continuum‐scale flow in hierarchically structured porous media is developed Explicit pore space morphology obtained by image analysis of X‐ray micro‐CT images is used for parameterization Predictions of solute breakthrough obtained by particle tracking perfectly match observations
    Keywords: Darcy'S Law ; Particle Tracking ; Column Experiments ; X‐Ray Μ‐Ct ; Pore Space Morphology ; Image Analysis
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
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  • 4
    In: Water Resources Research, April 2009, Vol.45(4), pp.n/a-n/a
    Description: High‐resolution optical bench‐scale experiments were conducted in order to investigate local gas flow pattern and integral flow properties caused by point‐like gas injection into water‐saturated glass beads. The main goal of this study was to test the validity of the continuum approach for two‐fluid flow in macroscopic homogeneous media. Analyzing the steady state experimental gas flow pattern that satisfies the necessary coherence condition by image processing and calibrating the optical gas distribution by the gravimetrical gas saturation, it was found that a pulse‐like function yields the best fit for the lateral gas saturation profile. This strange behavior of a relatively sharp saturation transition is in contradiction to the widely anticipated picture of a smooth Gaussian‐like transition, which is obtained by the continuum approach. This transition is caused by the channelized flow structure, and it turns out that only a narrow range of capillary pressure is realized by the system, whereas the continuum approach assumes that within the representative elementary volume the whole spectrum of capillary pressures can be realized. It was found that the stochastical hypothesis proposed by Selker et al. (2007) that bridges pore scale and continuum scale is supported by the experiments. In order to study channelized gas flow on the pore scale, a variational treatment, which minimizes the free energy of an undulating capillary, was carried out. On the basis of thermodynamical arguments the geometric form of a microcapillary, macrochannel formation and a length‐scale‐dependent transition in gas flow pattern from coherent to incoherent flow are discussed.
    Keywords: Air Sparging ; Continuum Modeling ; Pore‐Scale Modeling ; Gas Flow Pattern ; Instability Analysis ; Image Processing
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
    Source: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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