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  • Article  (17)
  • Vogel, Jorg  (17)
  • Proteins
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  • Article  (17)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 11 October 2016, Vol.113(41), pp.11591-11596
    Description: The functional annotation of transcriptomes and identification of noncoding RNA (ncRNA) classes has been greatly facilitated by the advent of next-generation RNA sequencing which, by reading the nucleotide order of transcripts, theoretically allows the rapid profiling of all transcripts in a cell. However, primary sequence per se is a poor predictor of function, as ncRNAs dramatically vary in length and structure and often lack identifiable motifs. Therefore, to visualize an informative RNA landscape of organisms with potentially new RNA biology that are emerging from microbiome and environmental studies requires the use of more functionally relevant criteria. One such criterion is the association of RNAs with functionally important cognate RNA-binding proteins. Here we analyze the full ensemble of cellular RNAs using gradient profiling by sequencing (Grad-seq) in the bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica, partitioning its coding and noncoding transcripts based on their network of RNA-protein interactions. In addition to capturing established RNA classes based on their biochemical profiles, the Grad-seq approach enabled the discovery of an overlooked large collective of structured small RNAs that form stable complexes with the conserved protein ProQ. We show that ProQ is an abundant RNA-binding protein with a wide range of ligands and a global influence on Salmonella gene expression. Given its generic ability to chart a functional RNA landscape irrespective of transcript length and sequence diversity, Grad-seq promises to define functional RNA classes and major RNA-binding proteins in both model species and genetically intractable organisms.
    Keywords: Hfq ; Proq ; RNA–Protein Interaction ; Noncoding RNA ; Small RNA ; Bacterial Proteins -- Metabolism ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing -- Methods ; RNA, Bacterial -- Metabolism ; RNA-Binding Proteins -- Metabolism ; Salmonella Enterica -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    In: Molecular Microbiology, April 2012, Vol.84(1), pp.1-5
    Description: The transcription factor CsgD governing the production of curli fimbriae and cellulose is a key player in the complex regulatory circuit that decides whether form biofilms. The gene itself is tightly controlled at the level of transcription by a large array of DNA‐binding proteins, but what happens after transcription is less understood. In this issue of , Jørgensen (2012), Mika (2012) and Thomason (2012) report on small RNAs (McaS, RprA and GcvB) that together with the RNA‐chaperone Hfq regulate the mRNAs of and other biofilm genes, and illustrate the burgeoning concept that the 5′ region of bacterial mRNA serves as a hub for sRNA‐mediated signal integration at the post‐transcriptional level.
    Keywords: Transcription (Genetics) ; Proteins ; Messenger Rna ; Genes ; Cellulose;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2011, Vol.6(3), p.e17296
    Description: P-bodies are dynamic aggregates of RNA and proteins involved in several post-transcriptional regulation processes. P-bodies have been shown to play important roles in regulating viral infection, whereas their interplay with bacterial pathogens, specifically intracellular bacteria that extensively manipulate host cell pathways, remains unknown. Here, we report that Salmonella infection induces P-body disassembly in a cell type-specific manner, and independently of previously characterized pathways such as inhibition of host cell RNA synthesis or microRNA-mediated gene silencing. We show that the Salmonella -induced P-body disassembly depends on the activation of the SPI-2 encoded type 3 secretion system, and that the secreted effector protein SpvB plays a major role in this process. P-body disruption is also induced by the related pathogen, Shigella flexneri , arguing that this might be a new mechanism by which intracellular bacterial pathogens subvert host cell function.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Infectious Diseases ; Microbiology ; Molecular Biology ; Cell Biology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Nature, 28 January 2016, Vol.529(7587), pp.496-501
    Description: Bacteria express many small RNAs for which the regulatory roles in pathogenesis have remained poorly understood due to a paucity of robust phenotypes in standard virulence assays. Here we use a generic 'dual RNA-seq' approach to profile RNA expression simultaneously in pathogen and host during Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection and reveal the molecular impact of bacterial riboregulators. We identify a PhoP-activated small RNA, PinT, which upon bacterial internalization temporally controls the expression of both invasion-associated effectors and virulence genes required for intracellular survival. This riboregulatory activity causes pervasive changes in coding and noncoding transcripts of the host. Interspecies correlation analysis links PinT to host cell JAK-STAT signalling, and we identify infection-specific alterations in multiple long noncoding RNAs. Our study provides a paradigm for a sensitive RNA-based analysis of intracellular bacterial pathogens and their hosts without physical separation, as well as a new discovery route for hidden functions of pathogen genes.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation -- Genetics ; Host-Pathogen Interactions -- Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Untranslated -- Genetics ; Salmonella Typhimurium -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00280836
    E-ISSN: 1476-4687
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Science (New York, N.Y.), 30 May 2014, Vol.344(6187), pp.972-3
    Description: Argonaute proteins have emerged as the key effectors in virtually all eukaryotic small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways (1). Central to all their activities is their association with the small guide RNAs that allow them to recognize through sequence complementarity, and in some cases also cleave, cellular transcripts.
    Keywords: DNA Cleavage ; Gene Silencing ; Argonaute Proteins -- Metabolism ; DNA -- Metabolism ; DNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; Plasmids -- Genetics ; Prokaryotic Cells -- Metabolism ; Rhodobacter Sphaeroides -- Genetics ; Thermus Thermophilus -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00368075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
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  • 6
    In: Molecular Microbiology, January 2009, Vol.71(1), pp.1-11
    Description: species are enterobacterial pathogens that have been exceptionally well investigated with respect to virulence mechanisms, microbial pathogenesis, genome evolution and many fundamental pathways of gene expression and metabolism. While these studies have traditionally focused on protein functions, has also become a model organism for RNA‐mediated regulation. The present review is dedicated to the non‐coding RNA world of : it covers small RNAs (sRNAs) that act as post‐transcriptional regulators of gene expression, novel Salmonella ‐regulatory RNA elements that sense metabolite and metal ion concentrations (or temperature), and globally acting RNA‐binding proteins such as CsrA or Hfq (inactivation of which cause drastic phenotypes and virulence defects). Owing to mosaic genome structure, some of the sRNAs are widely conserved in bacteria whereas others are very specific to species. Intriguingly, sRNAs of either type (CsrB/C, InvR, SgrS) facilitate cross‐talk between the core genome and its laterally acquired virulence regions. Work in also identified physiological functions (and mechanisms thereof) of RNA that had remained unknown in , and pioneered the use of high‐throughput sequencing technology to identify the sRNA and mRNA targets of bacterial RNA‐binding proteins.
    Keywords: Metabolites ; Proteins ; Messenger Rna ; Salmonella ; Gene Expression;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Nature Reviews Microbiology, 2018, Vol.16(10), pp.601-615
    Description: RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are central to most if not all cellular processes, dictating the fate of virtually all RNA molecules in the cell. Starting with pioneering work on ribosomal proteins, studies of bacterial RBPs have paved the way for molecular studies of RNA-protein interactions. Work over...
    Keywords: Medical And Health Sciences ; Basic Medicine ; Microbiology In The Medical Area ; Medicin Och Hälsovetenskap ; Medicinska Och Farmaceutiska Grundvetenskaper ; Mikrobiologi Inom Det Medicinska Området
    ISSN: 1740-1526
    E-ISSN: 17401534
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Molecular Cell, 16 September 2011, Vol.43(6), pp.880-891
    Description: Research on the discovery and characterization of small, regulatory RNAs in bacteria has exploded in recent years. These sRNAs act by base pairing with target mRNAs with which they share limited or extended complementarity, or by modulating protein activity, in some cases by mimicking other nucleic acids. Mechanistic insights into how sRNAs bind mRNAs and proteins, how they compete with each other, and how they interface with ribonucleases are active areas of discovery. Current work also has begun to illuminate how sRNAs modulate expression of distinct regulons and key transcription factors, thus integrating sRNA activity into extensive regulatory networks. In addition, the application of RNA deep sequencing has led to reports of hundreds of additional sRNA candidates in a wide swath of bacterial species. Most importantly, recent studies have served to clarify the abundance of remaining questions about how, when, and why sRNA-mediated regulation is of such importance to bacterial lifestyles.
    Keywords: Biology
    ISSN: 1097-2765
    E-ISSN: 1097-4164
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  • 9
    In: Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology, 2017
    Description: RNA is involved in the regulation of multiple cellular processes, often by forming sequence-specific base pairs with cellular RNA or DNA targets that must be identified among the large number of nucleic acids in a cell. Several RNA-based regulatory systems in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, including microRNAs (miRNAs), small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) and small RNAs (sRNAs) that are dependent on the RNA chaperone protein Hfq, achieve specificity using similar strategies. Central to their function is the presentation of short 'seed sequences' within a ribonucleoprotein complex to facilitate the search for and recognition of targets.
    Keywords: Micrornas -- Metabolism ; RNA, Small Interfering -- Metabolism;
    ISSN: 1471-0072
    E-ISSN: 1471-0080
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: PLoS Genetics, 2012, Vol.8(6), p.e1002782
    Description: RNA turnover plays an important role in both virulence and adaptation to stress in the Gram-positive human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus . However, the molecular players and mechanisms involved in these processes are poorly understood. Here, we explored the functions of S. aureus endoribonuclease III (RNase III), a member of the ubiquitous family of double-strand-specific endoribonucleases. To define genomic transcripts that are bound and processed by RNase III, we performed deep sequencing on cDNA libraries generated from RNAs that were co-immunoprecipitated with wild-type RNase III or two different cleavage-defective mutant variants in vivo . Several newly identified RNase III targets were validated by independent experimental methods. We identified various classes of structured RNAs as RNase III substrates and demonstrated that this enzyme is involved in the maturation of rRNAs and tRNAs, regulates the turnover of mRNAs and non-coding RNAs, and autoregulates its synthesis by cleaving within the coding region of its own mRNA. Moreover, we identified a positive effect of RNase III on protein synthesis based on novel mechanisms. RNase III–mediated cleavage in the 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) enhanced the stability and translation of cspA mRNA, which encodes the major cold-shock protein. Furthermore, RNase III cleaved overlapping 5′UTRs of divergently transcribed genes to generate leaderless mRNAs, which constitutes a novel way to co-regulate neighboring genes. In agreement with recent findings, low abundance antisense RNAs covering 44% of the annotated genes were captured by co-immunoprecipitation with RNase III mutant proteins. Thus, in addition to gene regulation, RNase III is associated with RNA quality control of pervasive transcription. Overall, this study illustrates the complexity of post-transcriptional regulation mediated by RNase III. ; Control of mRNA stability is crucial for bacteria to survive and rapidly adapt to environmental changes and stress conditions. The molecular players and the degradation pathways involved in these adaptive processes are poorly understood in . The universally conserved double-strand-specific endoribonuclease III (RNase III) in is known to repress the synthesis of several virulence factors and was recently implicated in genome-wide mRNA processing mediated by antisense transcripts. We present here the first global map of direct RNase III targets in . Deep sequencing was used to identify RNAs associated with epitope-tagged wild-type RNase III and two catalytically impaired but binding-competent mutant proteins . Experimental validation revealed an unexpected variety of structured RNA transcripts as novel RNase III substrates. In addition to rRNA operon maturation, autoregulation, degradation of structured RNAs, and antisense regulation, we propose novel mechanisms by which RNase III increases mRNA translation. Overall, this study shows that RNase III has a broad function in gene regulation of . We can now address more specifically the roles of this universally conserved enzyme in gene regulation in response to stress and during host infection.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Genetics And Genomics ; Microbiology
    ISSN: 1553-7390
    E-ISSN: 1553-7404
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