Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Proteome
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of biological chemistry, 23 March 2012, Vol.287(13), pp.9672-81
    Description: Stinging cells or nematocytes of jellyfish and other cnidarians represent one of the most poisonous and sophisticated cellular inventions in animal evolution. This ancient cell type is unique in containing a giant secretory vesicle derived from the Golgi apparatus. The organelle structure within the vesicle comprises an elastically stretched capsule (nematocyst) to which a long tubule is attached. During exocytosis, the barbed part of the tubule is accelerated with 〉5 million g in 〈700 ns, enabling a harpoon-like discharge (Nüchter, T., Benoit, M., Engel, U., Ozbek, S., and Holstein, T. W. (2006) Curr. Biol. 16, R316-R318). Hitherto, the molecular components responsible for the organelle's biomechanical properties were largely unknown. Here, we describe the proteome of nematocysts from the freshwater polyp Hydra magnipapillata. Our analysis revealed an unexpectedly complex secretome of 410 proteins with venomous and lytic but also adhesive or fibrous properties. In particular, the insoluble fraction of the nematocyst represents a functional extracellular matrix structure of collagenous and elastic nature. This finding suggests an evolutionary scenario in which exocytic vesicles harboring a venomous secretome assembled a sophisticated predatory structure from extracellular matrix motif proteins.
    Keywords: Evolution, Molecular ; Exocytosis -- Physiology ; Hydra -- Metabolism ; Nematocyst -- Metabolism ; Proteome -- Metabolism ; Secretory Vesicles -- Metabolism
    E-ISSN: 1083-351X
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: 2012, Vol.7(9), p.e45682
    Description: Tardigrades have fascinated researchers for more than 300 years because of their extraordinary capability to undergo cryptobiosis and survive extreme environmental conditions. However, the survival mechanisms of tardigrades are still poorly understood mainly due to the absence of detailed knowledge about the proteome and genome of these organisms. Our study was intended to provide a basis for the functional characterization of expressed proteins in different states of tardigrades. High-throughput, high-accuracy proteomics in combination with a newly developed tardigrade specific protein database resulted in the identification of more than 3000 proteins in three different states: early embryonic state and adult animals in active and anhydrobiotic state. This comprehensive proteome resource includes protein families such as chaperones, antioxidants, ribosomal proteins, cytoskeletal proteins, transporters, protein channels, nutrient reservoirs, and developmental proteins. A comparative analysis of protein families in the different states was performed by calculating the exponentially modified protein abundance index which classifies proteins in major and minor components. This is the first step to analyzing the proteins involved in early embryonic development, and furthermore proteins which might play an important role in the transition into the anhydrobiotic state.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Biochemistry
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2010, Vol.5(3), p.e9502
    Description: Tardigrades are small, multicellular invertebrates which are able to survive times of unfavourable environmental conditions using their well-known capability to undergo cryptobiosis at any stage of their life cycle. Milnesium tardigradum has become a powerful model system for the analysis of cryptobiosis. While some genetic information is already available for Milnesium tardigradum the proteome is still to be discovered. ; Here we present to the best of our knowledge the first comprehensive study of on the protein level. To establish a proteome reference map we developed optimized protocols for protein extraction from tardigrades in the active state and for separation of proteins by high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Since only limited sequence information of on the genome and gene expression level is available to date in public databases we initiated in parallel a tardigrade EST sequencing project to allow for protein identification by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. 271 out of 606 analyzed protein spots could be identified by searching against the publicly available NCBInr database as well as our newly established tardigrade protein database corresponding to 144 unique proteins. Another 150 spots could be identified in the tardigrade clustered EST database corresponding to 36 unique contigs and ESTs. Proteins with annotated function were further categorized in more detail by their molecular function, biological process and cellular component. For the proteins of unknown function more information could be obtained by performing a protein domain annotation analysis. Our results include proteins like protein member of different heat shock protein families and LEA group 3, which might play important roles in surviving extreme conditions. ; The proteome reference map of provides the basis for further studies in order to identify and characterize the biochemical mechanisms of tolerance to extreme desiccation. The optimized proteomics workflow will enable application of sensitive quantification techniques to detect differences in protein expression, which are characteristic of the active and anhydrobiotic states of tardigrades.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biochemistry -- Protein Chemistry ; Biotechnology -- Protein Chemistry And Proteomics ; Chemical Biology -- Protein Chemistry And Proteomics
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of proteome research, 02 December 2016, Vol.15(12), pp.4412-4422
    Description: Endogenous lectins have the capacity to translate glycan-encoded information on the cell surface into effects on cell growth. As test cases to examine changes in protein presence associated with tumor growth inhibition, we applied SILAC-based proteomics on human colon carcinoma cells treated with galectin-4 (Gal-4). The five tested lines-LS 180, Vaco 432, Colo 205, CX 1, and HCT 116-responded with differentiation and reduced proliferation to Gal-4 binding. In proteomic analysis (mass spectral data deposited with PRIDE, PXD003489), 2654 proteins were quantified, of which 190 were down-regulated and 115 were up-regulated (〉2-fold). 1D annotation analysis of the results indicated down-regulation of DNA replication-associated processes, while protein presence for secretory and transport functions appeared increased. The strongest induction was found for CALB2 (calretinin; ∼24-fold), TGM2 (protein-glutamine γ-glutamyltransferase 2; ∼11-fold), S100A3 (∼10-fold), and GSN (gelsolin; 9.5-fold), and the most pronounced decreases were seen for CDKN2A (tumor suppressor ARF; ∼6-fold), EPCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule; ∼6-fold), UBE2C (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 C; ∼5-fold), KIF2C (kinesin-like protein KIF2C; 5-fold), and LMNB1 (lamin-B1; ∼5-fold). The presence of the common proliferation marker Ki-67 was diminished about 4-fold. By tracing significant alterations of protein expression likely relevant for the observed phenotypic effects, the capacity of a galectin to affect the proteome of human colon cancer cells at multiple sites is revealed.
    Keywords: Silac ; Adhesion ; Cancer ; Lectin ; Malignancy ; Proliferation ; Cell Membrane -- Metabolism ; Colonic Neoplasms -- Metabolism ; Galectin 4 -- Pharmacology ; Proteome -- Drug Effects
    ISSN: 15353893
    E-ISSN: 1535-3907
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP, December 2014, Vol.13(12), pp.3446-56
    Description: Activin receptor type II (ACVR2) is a member of the transforming growth factor type II receptor family and controls cell growth and differentiation, thereby acting as a tumor suppressor. ACVR2 inactivation is known to drive colorectal tumorigenesis. We used an ACVR2-deficient microsatellite unstable colon cancer cell line (HCT116) to set up a novel experimental design for comprehensive analysis of proteomic changes associated with such functional loss of a tumor suppressor. To this end we combined two existing technologies. First, the ACVR2 gene was reconstituted in an ACVR2-deficient colorectal cancer (CRC) cell line by means of recombinase-mediated cassette exchange, resulting in the generation of an inducible expression system that allowed the regulation of ACVR2 gene expression in a doxycycline-dependent manner. Functional expression in the induced cells was explicitly proven. Second, we used the methionine analog azidohomoalanine for metabolic labeling of newly synthesized proteins in our cell line model. Labeled proteins were tagged with biotin via a Click-iT chemistry approach enabling specific extraction of labeled proteins by streptavidin-coated beads. Tryptic on-bead digestion of captured proteins and subsequent ultra-high-performance LC coupled to LTQ Orbitrap XL mass spectrometry identified 513 proteins, with 25 of them differentially expressed between ACVR2-deficient and -proficient cells. Among these, several candidates that had already been linked to colorectal cancer or were known to play a key role in cell growth or apoptosis control were identified, proving the utility of the presented experimental approach. In principle, this strategy can be adapted to analyze any gene of interest and its effect on the cellular de novo proteome.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Activin Receptors, Type II -- Genetics ; Proteome -- Genetics ; Staining and Labeling -- Methods
    ISSN: 15359476
    E-ISSN: 1535-9484
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Molecular & cellular proteomics : MCP, May 2017, Vol.16(5), pp.855-872
    Description: Radiotherapy is a cornerstone of cancer therapy. The recently established particle therapy with raster-scanning protons and carbon ions landmarks a new era in the field of high-precision cancer medicine. However, molecular mechanisms governing radiation induced intracellular signaling remain elusive. Here, we present the first comprehensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic study applying stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in combination with high-resolution mass spectrometry to decipher cellular response to irradiation with X-rays, protons and carbon ions. At protein expression level limited alterations were observed 2 h post irradiation of human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In contrast, 181 phosphorylation sites were found to be differentially regulated out of which 151 sites were not hitherto attributed to radiation response as revealed by crosscheck with the PhosphoSitePlus database.Radiation-induced phosphorylation of the p(S/T)Q motif was the prevailing regulation pattern affecting proteins involved in DNA damage response signaling. Because radiation doses were selected to produce same level of cell kill and DNA double-strand breakage for each radiation quality, DNA damage responsive phosphorylation sites were regulated to same extent. However, differential phosphorylation between radiation qualities was observed for 55 phosphorylation sites indicating the existence of distinct signaling circuitries induced by X-ray particle (proton/carbon) irradiation beyond the canonical DNA damage response. This unexpected finding was confirmed in targeted spike-in experiments using synthetic isotope labeled phosphopeptides. Herewith, we successfully validated uniform DNA damage response signaling coexisting with altered signaling involved in apoptosis and metabolic processes induced by X-ray and particle based treatments.In summary, the comprehensive insight into the radiation-induced phosphoproteome landscape is instructive for the design of functional studies aiming to decipher cellular signaling processes in response to radiotherapy, space radiation or ionizing radiation Further, our data will have a significant impact on the ongoing debate about patient treatment modalities.
    Keywords: Protons ; Carbon -- Chemistry ; Phosphoproteins -- Metabolism ; Proteome -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 15359476
    E-ISSN: 1535-9484
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Cell Communication and Signaling, 01 April 2017, Vol.15(1), pp.1-14
    Description: Abstract Background Colorectal cancers (CRCs) that lack DNA mismatch repair function exhibit the microsatellite unstable (MSI) phenotype and are characterized by the accumulation of frameshift mutations at short repetitive DNA sequences (microsatellites). These tumors recurrently show inactivating...
    Keywords: Exosomes ; Intercellular Communication ; Proteomics ; Transforming Growth Factor Beta Receptor Type 2 ; DNA Mismatch Repair Deficiency ; Microsatellite Instability ; Biology
    E-ISSN: 1478-811X
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Language: English
    In: PROTEOMICS, January 2009, Vol.9(2), pp.322-334
    Description: Olfactory sensory neurons expose to the inhaled air chemosensory cilia which bind odorants and operate as transduction organelles. Odorant receptors in the ciliary membrane activate a transduction cascade which uses cAMP and Ca for sensory signaling in the ciliary lumen. Although the canonical transduction pathway is well established, molecular components for more complex aspects of sensory transduction, like adaptation, regulation, and termination of the receptor response have not been systematically identified. Moreover, open questions in olfactory physiology include how the cilia exchange solutes with the surrounding mucus, assemble their highly polarized set of proteins, and cope with noxious substances in the ambient air. A specific ciliary proteome would promote research efforts in all of these fields. We have improved a method to detach cilia from rat olfactory sensory neurons and have isolated a preparation specifically enriched in ciliary membrane proteins. Using LC‐ESI‐MS/MS analysis, we identified 377 proteins which constitute the olfactory cilia proteome. These proteins represent a comprehensive data set for olfactory research since more than 80% can be attributed to the characteristic functions of olfactory sensory neurons and their cilia: signal processing, protein targeting, neurogenesis, solute transport, and cytoprotection. Organellar proteomics thus yielded decisive information about the diverse physiological functions of a sensory organelle.
    Keywords: Mass Spectrometry ; Olfactory Receptor Neurons ; Proteomic Analysis ; Sensory Cilia ; Signal Transduction
    ISSN: 1615-9853
    E-ISSN: 1615-9861
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages