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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: European eating disorders review : the journal of the Eating Disorders Association, 2011, Vol.19(1), pp.37-45
    Description: To present a case report detailing the use of an enhanced form of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). The treatment was provided to an adolescent with an eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) diagnosis, and included a focus on the additional maintaining mechanisms of mood intolerance and interpersonal problems. This case began as an unsuccessful attempt at family therapy, where the underlying dysfunction exacerbated symptoms and demoralized the family. The therapist subsequently chose to utilize an enhanced version of CBT to simultaneously address the patient's symptoms and try to effect change across multiple domains. A description of the patient's eating disorder pathology, the 29-session treatment, and outcome, are provided. This case study illustrates that it is possible to successfully use enhanced CBT with developmentally appropriate adaptations in the treatment of a young patient with an EDNOS diagnosis, as suggested by Cooper and Stewart (2008).
    Keywords: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy ; Feeding and Eating Disorders -- Therapy
    E-ISSN: 1099-0968
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, December 2012, Vol.50(12), pp.797-804
    Description: Mirror exposure therapy has proven efficacious in improving body image among individuals with shape/weight concerns and eating disorders. No randomized controlled trials have examined the effect of mirror exposure in a healthy-weight clinical sample of eating disordered individuals. The purpose of the current study was to test the efficacy of a five-session acceptance based mirror exposure therapy (A-MET) versus a non directive body image therapy (ND) control as an adjunctive treatment to outpatient eating disorder treatment. Thirty-three males and females aged 14–65 with a body mass index of 18.5–29.9 were randomized to five sessions of A-MET or ND with a 1-month follow-up. Results indicated large to moderate effect size differences for efficacy of A-MET across measures of body checking, body image dissatisfaction, and eating disorder symptoms (  = −0.38 to −1.61) at end of treatment and follow-up. Baseline measures of social comparison and history of appearance-related teasing were predictive of treatment response. There were also differential effects of treatment on participants' perceived homework quality, but no differences in therapeutic alliance. Results suggest that A-MET is a promising adjunctive treatment for residual body image disturbance among normal and overweight individuals undergoing treatment for an eating disorder. Future research and clinical implications are discussed. ► Mirror Exposure is superior to non directive treatment for body image disturbance. ► Mirror Exposure results in secondary improvements in eating disorder symptoms. ► Social comparison was a negative predictor of treatment response. ► Teasing and greater thin-ideal internalization predicted greater treatment response. ► Participants' perception of homework improved in mirror exposure therapy.
    Keywords: Eating Disorders ; Mirror Exposure ; Body Image Disturbance ; Latent Growth Curve Model ; Randomized Control Trial ; Anxiety ; Medicine ; Psychology
    ISSN: 0005-7967
    E-ISSN: 1873-622X
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Personality and Individual Differences, October 2016, Vol.101, pp.484-484
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2016.05.162 Byline: A. Hildebrandt, H. Nowparast Rostami, G. Ouyang, C. Zhou, W. Sommer
    Keywords: Psychology
    ISSN: 0191-8869
    E-ISSN: 1873-3549
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 2015, Vol.83(3), pp.649-654
    Description: Objective: Analysis of short- and long-term effects of rapid response across 3 different treatments for binge eating disorder (BED). Method: In a randomized clinical study comparing interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), cognitive–behavioral therapy guided self-help (CBTgsh), and behavioral weight loss (BWL) treatment in 205 adults meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM–IV ; APA, 1994 ) criteria for BED, the predictive value of rapid response, defined as ≥70% reduction in binge eating by Week 4, was determined for remission from binge eating and global eating disorder psychopathology at posttreatment, 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-month follow-ups. Results: Rapid responders in CBTgsh, but not in IPT or BWL, showed significantly greater rates of remission from binge eating than nonrapid responders, which was sustained over the long term. Rapid and nonrapid responders in IPT and rapid responders in CBTgsh showed a greater remission from binge eating than nonrapid responders in CBTgsh and BWL. Rapid responders in CBTgsh showed greater remission from binge eating than rapid responders in BWL. Although rapid responders in all treatments had lower global eating disorder psychopathology than nonrapid responders in the short term, rapid responders in CBTgsh and IPT were more improved than those in BWL and nonrapid responders in each treatment. Rapid responders in BWL did not differ from nonrapid responders in CBTgsh and IPT. Conclusion: Rapid response is a treatment-specific positive prognostic indicator of sustained remission from binge eating in CBTgsh. Regarding an evidence-based, stepped-care model, IPT, equally efficacious for rapid and nonrapid responders, could be investigated as a second-line treatment in case of nonrapid response to first-line CBTgsh. ; This study provides evidence for rapid response as a treatment-specific positive prognostic indicator of long-term remission in cognitive–behavioral guided self-help (CBTgsh), a low-intensity, low-cost treatment for binge eating disorder. ; In contrast, interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), a specialty treatment, was comparably efficacious for both rapid and nonrapid responders, whereas nonrapid responders in CBTgsh and rapid and nonrapid responders in behavioral weight loss treatment showed the lowest remission rates. ; Monitoring rapid response can provide guidance regarding a switch from a low-intensity treatment (e.g., CBTgsh) to a more intensive treatment (e.g., IPT) to promote successful outcomes in individuals diagnosed with binge eating disorder.
    Keywords: Binge Eating Disorder ; Rapid Response ; Self-Help Treatment ; Interpersonal Psychotherapy ; Behavioral Weight Loss
    ISSN: 0022-006X
    E-ISSN: 1939-2117
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Clinical Social Work Journal, 2016, Vol.44(1), pp.105-113
    Description: Research has increasingly noted that gay male adults are more at risk for developing body image dissatisfaction than other male populations. Body image issues warrant attention, particularly since they have been connected to the development of disordered eating patterns. Studies have often traced gay male body dissatisfaction to various sociocultural elements and phenomena, particularly the media. In fact, various media genres have been implicated as being instrumental in propagating idealized male physiques, which in turn may negatively influence observers. Using objectification theory, this paper aims to review the process by which media imagery are internalized by some gay men and how such internalizations harmfully impact their body image. The clinical implications and treatment of body dissatisfaction will be reviewed in terms of social work practice with gay male populations.
    Keywords: Gay ; Body image ; Media ; Objectification ; Social comparison
    ISSN: 0091-1674
    E-ISSN: 1573-3343
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Personality and Individual Differences, April 2014, Vol.60, pp.S36-S36
    Description: Taxonomic models of emotional abilities have focused on receptive facets. Latent variable modeling of facial emotion expression as an ability construct has been neglected so far. We developed a task battery including multiple methods for assessing the ability to display six main emotions, anger, fear, sadness, surprise, disgust, and happiness. Video recordings of the emotion displays were analyzed for 245 participants. Following automatic expression coding, elaborate scoring and systematic model testing we established a measurement model of productive emotional abilities. The structure that best described the observed data controlled for face plasticity and showed emotion-specific factors that are nested under a general expressivity factor. Individual differences in Action Unit networks characterizing specific emotions will be considered. Structural models revealed a positive relationship of facial expressivity with receptive abilities and extraversion. Results will be discussed in the context of recent debates in emotion research and models of emotional abilities.
    Keywords: Psychology
    ISSN: 0191-8869
    E-ISSN: 1873-3549
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Personality and Individual Differences, October 2016, Vol.101, pp.509-509
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2016.05.273 Byline: G. Recio, A. Hildebrandt, W. Sommer, O. Wilhelm
    Keywords: Psychology
    ISSN: 0191-8869
    E-ISSN: 1873-3549
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Personality and Individual Differences, October 2016, Vol.101, pp.487-487
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2016.05.175 Byline: L. Kaltwasser, A. Hildebrandt, O. Wilhelm, W. Sommer
    Keywords: Psychology
    ISSN: 0191-8869
    E-ISSN: 1873-3549
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Clinical Psychology Review, 2010, Vol.30(6), pp.655-668
    Description: Serotonergic dysregulation is thought to underlie much of the pathology in bulimia nervosa (BN). The purpose of this review is to expand the serotonergic model by incorporating specific and nonspecific contributions of estrogens to the development and maintenance of bulimic pathology in order to guide research from molecular genetics to novel therapeutics for BN. Special emphasis is given to the organizing theory of general brain arousal which allows for integration of specific and nonspecific effects of these systems on behavioral endpoints such as binge eating or purging as well as arousal states such as fear, novelty seeking, or sex. Regulation of the serotonergic system by estrogens is explored, and genetic, epigenetic, and environmental estrogen effects on bulimic pathology and risk factors are discussed. Genetic and neuroscientific research support this two-system conceptualization of BN with both contributions to the developmental and maintenance of the disorder. Implications of an estrogenic–serotonergic model of BN are discussed as well as guidelines and suggestions for future research and novel therapeutic targets.
    Keywords: Bulimia Nervosa ; Estrogen ; Serotonin ; Brain Arousal ; Sex Hormones ; Epigenetics ; Psychology
    ISSN: 0272-7358
    E-ISSN: 1873-7811
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  • 10
    In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, December 2015, Vol.48(8), pp.1122-1131
    Description: OBJECTIVE: Impediments limit dissemination and implementation of evidence-based interventions (EBIs), including lack of sufficient training. One strategy to increase implementation of EBIs is the train-the-trainer (TTT) model. The Body Project is a peer-led body image program that reduces eating disorder (ED) risk factors. This study examined the effectiveness of a TTT model at reducing risk factors in Body Project participants. Specifically, this study examined whether a master trainer could train a novice trainer to train undergraduate peer leaders to administer the Body Project such that individuals who received the Body Project (i.e., participants) would evidence comparable outcomes to previous trials. We hypothesized that participants would evidence reductions in ED risk factors, with effect sizes similar to previous trials.METHOD: Utilizing a TTT model, a master trainer trained a novice trainer to train undergraduate peer leaders to administer the Body Project to undergraduate women. Undergraduate women aged 18 years or older who received the Body Project intervention participated in the trial and completed measures at baseline, post-treatment, and five-month follow-up. Primary outcomes included body dissatisfaction, thin ideal internalization, negative affect, and ED pathology.RESULTS: Participants demonstrated significant reductions in thin ideal internalization, ED pathology and body dissatisfaction at post-treatment and 5-month follow-up. At 5 months, using three different strategies for managing missing data, effect sizes were larger or comparable to earlier trials for 3 out of 4 variables.DISCUSSION: Results support a TTT model for Body Project implementation and the importance of utilizing sensitivity analyses for longitudinal datasets with missing data.
    Keywords: Dissemination ; Prevention ; Train‐The‐Trainer
    ISSN: 0276-3478
    E-ISSN: 1098-108X
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