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  • RNA, Bacterial  (6)
  • Hfq
  • OneFile (GALE)  (6)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 25 August 2015, Vol.112(34), pp.E4772-81
    Description: Horizontal gene transfer via plasmid conjugation is a major driving force in microbial evolution but constitutes a complex process that requires synchronization with the physiological state of the host bacteria. Although several host transcription factors are known to regulate plasmid-borne transfer genes, RNA-based regulatory circuits for host-plasmid communication remain unknown. We describe a posttranscriptional mechanism whereby the Hfq-dependent small RNA, RprA, inhibits transfer of pSLT, the virulence plasmid of Salmonella enterica. RprA employs two separate seed-pairing domains to activate the mRNAs of both the sigma-factor σ(S) and the RicI protein, a previously uncharacterized membrane protein here shown to inhibit conjugation. Transcription of ricI requires σ(S) and, together, RprA and σ(S) orchestrate a coherent feedforward loop with AND-gate logic to tightly control the activation of RicI synthesis. RicI interacts with the conjugation apparatus protein TraV and limits plasmid transfer under membrane-damaging conditions. To our knowledge, this study reports the first small RNA-controlled feedforward loop relying on posttranscriptional activation of two independent targets and an unexpected role of the conserved RprA small RNA in controlling extrachromosomal DNA transfer.
    Keywords: Hfq ; Rpra ; Feedforward Control ; Plasmid Conjugation ; Srna ; Chromosomes, Bacterial ; DNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; Salmonella -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Molecular Cell, 04 February 2016, Vol.61(3), pp.352-363
    Description: Small RNAs (sRNAs) from conserved noncoding genes are crucial regulators in bacterial signaling pathways but have remained elusive in the Cpx response to inner membrane stress. Here we report that an alternative biogenesis pathway releasing the conserved mRNA 3′ UTR of stress chaperone CpxP as an ∼60-nt sRNA provides the noncoding arm of the Cpx response. This so-called CpxQ sRNA, generated by general mRNA decay through RNase E, acts as an Hfq-dependent repressor of multiple mRNAs encoding extracytoplasmic proteins. Both CpxQ and the Cpx pathway are required for cell survival under conditions of dissipation of membrane potential. Our discovery of CpxQ illustrates how the conversion of a transcribed 3′ UTR into an sRNA doubles the output of a single mRNA to produce two factors with spatially segregated functions during inner membrane stress: a chaperone that targets problematic proteins in the periplasm and a regulatory RNA that dampens their synthesis in the cytosol. Chao and Vogel discover that a small RNA cleaved off the 3′ end of an mRNA provides the elusive regulatory noncoding arm of the bacterial Cpx response to inner membrane stress.
    Keywords: Cpx Pathway ; Cpxp ; Cpxq ; 3′ Utr ; Hfq ; Rnase E ; Noncoding RNA ; Nhab ; Envelope Stress ; Membrane Potential ; Biology
    ISSN: 1097-2765
    E-ISSN: 1097-4164
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Genes & development, 15 May 2013, Vol.27(10), pp.1073-8
    Description: The abundant RNA-binding proteins CsrA and Hfq each impact bacterial physiology by working in conjunction with small RNAs to control large post-transcriptional regulons. The small RNAs involved were considered mechanistically distinct, regulating mRNAs either directly through Hfq-mediated base-pairing or indirectly by sequestering the global translational repressor CsrA. In this issue of Genes & Development, Jørgensen and colleagues (pp. 1132-1145) blur these distinctions with a dual-mechanism small RNA that acts through both Hfq and CsrA to regulate the formation of bacterial biofilms.
    Keywords: Csra ; Csrb ; Hfq ; Pga ; C-Di-Gmp ; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial ; Biofilms -- Growth & Development ; Escherichia Coli -- Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics
    ISSN: 08909369
    E-ISSN: 1549-5477
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Molecular Cell, 05 January 2017, Vol.65(1), pp.39-51
    Description: Understanding RNA processing and turnover requires knowledge of cleavages by major endoribonucleases within a living cell. We have employed TIER-seq (transiently inactivating an endoribonuclease followed by RNA-seq) to profile cleavage products of the essential endoribonuclease RNase E in . A dominating cleavage signature is the location of a uridine two nucleotides downstream in a single-stranded segment, which we rationalize structurally as a key recognition determinant that may favor RNase E catalysis. Our results suggest a prominent biogenesis pathway for bacterial regulatory small RNAs whereby RNase E acts together with the RNA chaperone Hfq to liberate stable 3′ fragments from various precursor RNAs. Recapitulating this process in vitro, Hfq guides RNase E cleavage of a representative small-RNA precursor for interaction with a mRNA target. In vivo, the processing is required for target regulation. Our findings reveal a general maturation mechanism for a major class of post-transcriptional regulators. Chao et al. discover that the essential bacterial RNase E cleaves numerous transcripts at preferred sites by sensing uridine as a 2-nt ruler. RNase E processing of various precursor RNAs produces many small regulatory RNAs, constituting a major small-RNA biogenesis pathway in bacteria.
    Keywords: Rnase E ; RNA Degradome ; Non-Coding RNA ; Hfq ; 3′ Utr ; Arcz ; Rpra ; Srna Maturation ; Uridine Ruler ; Tier-Seq ; Biology
    ISSN: 1097-2765
    E-ISSN: 1097-4164
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Genes & development, 01 November 2008, Vol.22(21), pp.2914-25
    Description: Noncoding RNA regulators have been implicated in almost all imaginable cellular processes. Here we review how regulatory small RNAs such as Spot42, SgrS, GlmY, and GlmZ and a cis-encoded ribozyme in glmS mRNA control sugar metabolism. Besides discussing the physiological implications, we show how the study of these molecules contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms and of general principles of RNA-based regulation. These include the post-transcriptional repression or activation of gene expression within polycistronic mRNAs; novel ribonucleoprotein complexes composed of small RNA, Hfq, and/or RNase E; and the hierarchical action of regulatory RNAs.
    Keywords: Carbohydrate Metabolism ; Bacterial Proteins -- Metabolism ; RNA, Bacterial -- Metabolism ; RNA, Untranslated -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 0890-9369
    E-ISSN: 15495477
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Genes & Development, 2005, Vol.19(19), pp.2355-2366
    Description: This paper shows that the small RNA MicA (previously SraD) is an antisense regulator of ompA in Escherichia coli. MicA accumulates upon entry into stationary phase and down-regulates the level of ompA mRNA. Regulation of ompA (outer membrane protein A), previously attributed to Hfq/mRNA binding, is lost...
    Keywords: Medical And Health Sciences ; Medicin Och Hälsovetenskap ; Antisense Rna ; Hfq ; Ompa ; Regulatory Rna ; Translational Control
    ISSN: 0890-9369
    E-ISSN: 15495477
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