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  • Article  (22)
  • Vogel, Jorg  (22)
  • RNA, Messenger  (22)
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  • Article  (22)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 23 November 2010, Vol.107(47), pp.20435-40
    Description: The abundant class of bacterial Hfq-associated small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) parallels animal microRNAs in their ability to control multiple genes at the posttranscriptional level by short and imperfect base pairing. In contrast to the universal length and seed pairing mechanism of microRNAs, the sRNAs are heterogeneous in size and structure, and how they regulate multiple targets is not well understood. This paper provides evidence that a 5' located sRNA domain is a critical element for the control of a large posttranscriptional regulon. We show that the conserved 5' end of RybB sRNA recognizes multiple mRNAs of Salmonella outer membrane proteins by ≥7-bp Watson-Crick pairing. When fused to an unrelated sRNA, the 5' domain is sufficient to guide target mRNA degradation and maintain σ(E)-dependent envelope homeostasis. RybB sites in mRNAs are often conserved and flanked by 3' adenosine. They are found in a wide sequence window ranging from the upstream untranslated region to the deep coding sequence, indicating that some targets might be repressed at the level of translation, whereas others are repressed primarily by mRNA destabilization. Autonomous 5' domains seem more common in sRNAs than appreciated and might improve the design of synthetic RNA regulators.
    Keywords: Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins -- Metabolism ; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Messenger -- Metabolism ; Regulatory Sequences, Ribonucleic Acid -- Genetics ; Regulon -- Genetics ; Salmonella -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    In: Molecular Microbiology, April 2012, Vol.84(1), pp.1-5
    Description: The transcription factor CsgD governing the production of curli fimbriae and cellulose is a key player in the complex regulatory circuit that decides whether form biofilms. The gene itself is tightly controlled at the level of transcription by a large array of DNA‐binding proteins, but what happens after transcription is less understood. In this issue of , Jørgensen (2012), Mika (2012) and Thomason (2012) report on small RNAs (McaS, RprA and GcvB) that together with the RNA‐chaperone Hfq regulate the mRNAs of and other biofilm genes, and illustrate the burgeoning concept that the 5′ region of bacterial mRNA serves as a hub for sRNA‐mediated signal integration at the post‐transcriptional level.
    Keywords: Transcription (Genetics) ; Proteins ; Messenger Rna ; Genes ; Cellulose;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 3
    In: EMBO Journal, 17 October 2012, Vol.31(20), pp.4005-4019
    Description: The small RNAs associated with the protein Hfq constitute one of the largest classes of post‐transcriptional regulators known to date. Most previously investigated members of this class are encoded by conserved free‐standing genes. Here, deep sequencing of Hfq‐bound transcripts from multiple stages of growth of revealed a plethora of new small RNA species from within mRNA loci, including DapZ, which overlaps with the 3′ region of the biosynthetic gene, . Synthesis of the DapZ small RNA is independent of DapB protein synthesis, and is controlled by HilD, the master regulator of invasion genes. DapZ carries a short G/U‐rich domain similar to that of the globally acting GcvB small RNA, and uses GcvB‐like seed pairing to repress translation of the major ABC transporters, DppA and OppA. This exemplifies double functional output from an mRNA locus by the production of both a protein and an Hfq‐dependent ‐acting RNA. Our atlas of Hfq targets suggests that the 3′ regions of mRNA genes constitute a rich reservoir that provides the Hfq network with new regulatory small RNAs. Deep sequencing of Hfq‐binding RNAs isolated from at different growth stages reveals that the 3′ UTR of bacterial mRNAs are a rich source of regulatory small RNAs which modulate gene expression in trans.
    Keywords: Abc Transporter ; Dapz ; Gcvb ; Hfq ; 3′ Utr
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 4
    In: Molecular Microbiology, September 2009, Vol.73(5), pp.737-741
    Description: Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are well known to command bacterial protein synthesis by modulating the translation and decay of target mRNAs. Most sRNAs are specifically regulated by a cognate transcription factor under certain growth or stress conditions. Investigations of the conserved Hfq‐dependent MicM sRNA in (article by Poul Valentin‐Hansen and colleagues in this issue of ) and in have unravelled a novel type of gene regulation in which the chitobiose operon mRNA acts as an RNA trap to degrade the constitutively expressed MicM sRNA, thereby alleviating MicM‐mediated repression of the synthesis of the YbfM porin that is required for chitosugar uptake. The results suggest that ‘target’ mRNAs might be both prey and also predators of sRNAs.
    Keywords: Protein Synthesis ; Messenger Rna;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Molecular Cell, 04 February 2016, Vol.61(3), pp.352-363
    Description: Small RNAs (sRNAs) from conserved noncoding genes are crucial regulators in bacterial signaling pathways but have remained elusive in the Cpx response to inner membrane stress. Here we report that an alternative biogenesis pathway releasing the conserved mRNA 3′ UTR of stress chaperone CpxP as an ∼60-nt sRNA provides the noncoding arm of the Cpx response. This so-called CpxQ sRNA, generated by general mRNA decay through RNase E, acts as an Hfq-dependent repressor of multiple mRNAs encoding extracytoplasmic proteins. Both CpxQ and the Cpx pathway are required for cell survival under conditions of dissipation of membrane potential. Our discovery of CpxQ illustrates how the conversion of a transcribed 3′ UTR into an sRNA doubles the output of a single mRNA to produce two factors with spatially segregated functions during inner membrane stress: a chaperone that targets problematic proteins in the periplasm and a regulatory RNA that dampens their synthesis in the cytosol. Chao and Vogel discover that a small RNA cleaved off the 3′ end of an mRNA provides the elusive regulatory noncoding arm of the bacterial Cpx response to inner membrane stress.
    Keywords: Cpx Pathway ; Cpxp ; Cpxq ; 3′ Utr ; Hfq ; Rnase E ; Noncoding RNA ; Nhab ; Envelope Stress ; Membrane Potential ; Biology
    ISSN: 1097-2765
    E-ISSN: 1097-4164
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  • 6
    In: Molecular Microbiology, September 2011, Vol.81(5), pp.1144-1165
    Description: GcvB is one of the most highly conserved Hfq‐associated small RNAs in Gram‐negative bacteria and was previously reported to repress several ABC transporters for amino acids. To determine the full extent of GcvB‐mediated regulation in , we combined a genome‐wide experimental approach with biocomputational target prediction. Comparative pulse expression of wild‐type versus mutant sRNA variants revealed that GcvB governs a large post‐transcriptional regulon, impacting ∼1% of all genes via its conserved G/U‐rich domain R1. Complementary predictions of C/A‐rich binding sites in mRNAs and reporter fusion experiments increased the number of validated GcvB targets to more than 20, and doubled the number of regulated amino acid transporters. Unlike the previously described targeting via the single R1 domain, GcvB represses the glycine transporter CycA by exceptionally redundant base‐pairing. This novel ability of GcvB is focused upon the one target that could feedback‐regulate the glycine‐responsive synthesis of GcvB. Several newly discovered mRNA targets involved in amino acid metabolism, including the global regulator Lrp, question the previous assumption that GcvB simply acts to limit unnecessary amino acid uptake. Rather, GcvB rewires primary transcriptional control circuits and seems to act as a distinct regulatory node in amino acid metabolism.
    Keywords: Glycine -- Physiological Aspects ; Genetic Research -- Physiological Aspects ; Genomics -- Physiological Aspects ; Messenger Rna -- Physiological Aspects;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Current Opinion in Microbiology, 2010, Vol.13(1), pp.24-33
    Description: The ubiquitous RNA-binding protein, Hfq, has been shown to be required for the fitness and virulence of an increasing number of bacterial pathogens. Mutants lacking Hfq are often sensitive to host defense mechanisms and highly attenuated in animal models, albeit there is considerable variation in both severity and extent of phenotypes. RNomics and deep sequencing (RNA-seq) approaches discovered the small RNA and mRNA targets of Hfq, and indicated that this protein might impact on the expression of up to 20% of all genes in some organisms, including genes of type 3 secretion systems Hfq also facilitates post-transcriptional cross-talk between the core and variable genome regions of bacterial pathogens, and might help integrate horizontally acquired virulence genes into existing regulatory networks.
    Keywords: Biology
    ISSN: 1369-5274
    E-ISSN: 1879-0364
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Molecular Cell, 16 September 2011, Vol.43(6), pp.880-891
    Description: Research on the discovery and characterization of small, regulatory RNAs in bacteria has exploded in recent years. These sRNAs act by base pairing with target mRNAs with which they share limited or extended complementarity, or by modulating protein activity, in some cases by mimicking other nucleic acids. Mechanistic insights into how sRNAs bind mRNAs and proteins, how they compete with each other, and how they interface with ribonucleases are active areas of discovery. Current work also has begun to illuminate how sRNAs modulate expression of distinct regulons and key transcription factors, thus integrating sRNA activity into extensive regulatory networks. In addition, the application of RNA deep sequencing has led to reports of hundreds of additional sRNA candidates in a wide swath of bacterial species. Most importantly, recent studies have served to clarify the abundance of remaining questions about how, when, and why sRNA-mediated regulation is of such importance to bacterial lifestyles.
    Keywords: Biology
    ISSN: 1097-2765
    E-ISSN: 1097-4164
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Current Opinion in Microbiology, February 2017, Vol.35, pp.78-87
    Description: Understanding how bacteria cause disease requires knowledge of which genes are expressed and how they are regulated during infection. While RNA-seq is now a routine method for gene expression analysis in bacterial pathogens, the past years have also witnessed a surge of novel RNA-seq based approaches going beyond standard mRNA profiling. These include variations of the technique to capture post-transcriptional networks controlled by small RNAs and to discover associated RNA-binding proteins in the pathogen itself. Dual RNA-seq analyzing pathogen and host simultaneously has revealed roles of noncoding RNAs during infection and enabled the correlation of bacterial gene activity with specific host responses. Single-cell RNA-seq studies have addressed how heterogeneity among individual host cells may determine infection outcomes.
    Keywords: Biology
    ISSN: 1369-5274
    E-ISSN: 1879-0364
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Current Opinion in Microbiology, April 2015, Vol.24, pp.132-139
    Description: Most studies of small regulatory RNAs in bacteria have focussed on conserved transcripts in intergenic regions. However, several recent developments including single-nucleotide resolution transcriptome profiling by RNA-seq and increased knowledge of the cellular targets of the RNA chaperone Hfq suggest that the bacterial world of functional small RNAs is more diverse. One emerging class are small RNAs that are identical to the 3′ regions of known mRNAs, but are produced either by transcription from internal promoters or by mRNA processing. Using several recently discovered examples of such sRNAs, we discuss their biogenesis and modes of action, and illustrate how they can facilitate mRNA crosstalk in various physiological processes.
    Keywords: Biology
    ISSN: 1369-5274
    E-ISSN: 1879-0364
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