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  • Article  (11)
  • RNA, Untranslated  (11)
  • Salmonella
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  • Article  (11)
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 11 October 2016, Vol.113(41), pp.11591-11596
    Description: The functional annotation of transcriptomes and identification of noncoding RNA (ncRNA) classes has been greatly facilitated by the advent of next-generation RNA sequencing which, by reading the nucleotide order of transcripts, theoretically allows the rapid profiling of all transcripts in a cell. However, primary sequence per se is a poor predictor of function, as ncRNAs dramatically vary in length and structure and often lack identifiable motifs. Therefore, to visualize an informative RNA landscape of organisms with potentially new RNA biology that are emerging from microbiome and environmental studies requires the use of more functionally relevant criteria. One such criterion is the association of RNAs with functionally important cognate RNA-binding proteins. Here we analyze the full ensemble of cellular RNAs using gradient profiling by sequencing (Grad-seq) in the bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica, partitioning its coding and noncoding transcripts based on their network of RNA-protein interactions. In addition to capturing established RNA classes based on their biochemical profiles, the Grad-seq approach enabled the discovery of an overlooked large collective of structured small RNAs that form stable complexes with the conserved protein ProQ. We show that ProQ is an abundant RNA-binding protein with a wide range of ligands and a global influence on Salmonella gene expression. Given its generic ability to chart a functional RNA landscape irrespective of transcript length and sequence diversity, Grad-seq promises to define functional RNA classes and major RNA-binding proteins in both model species and genetically intractable organisms.
    Keywords: Hfq ; Proq ; RNA–Protein Interaction ; Noncoding RNA ; Small RNA ; Bacterial Proteins -- Metabolism ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing -- Methods ; RNA, Bacterial -- Metabolism ; RNA-Binding Proteins -- Metabolism ; Salmonella Enterica -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    In: EMBO Journal, 02 July 2018, Vol.37(13), pp.n/a-n/a
    Description: Long non‐coding s (lncs) play important roles in many cellular pathways, but their contribution to the defense of eukaryotic cells against pathogens remains poorly understood. A new study from Imamura in reports that infection in human cells impacts nuclear decay, which in turn drives the accumulation of otherwise unstable nuclear lncs, some of which may have protective effects against this common bacterial pathogen. These unexpected findings demand more efforts to fully decrypt the molecular functions of lncs in innate and adaptive immunity. infection impairs the nuclear RNA decay machinery in human cells, increasing the abundance of long non‐coding RNAs with a role in innate immunity.
    Keywords: Pathogens ; Immunity ; Infections ; Pathogens ; Molecular Chains ; Salmonella ; Bacterial Infections ; Pathogens ; Ribonucleic Acid–RNA ; Ribonucleic Acid–RNA ; Adaptive Immunity;
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Nature, 28 January 2016, Vol.529(7587), pp.496-501
    Description: Bacteria express many small RNAs for which the regulatory roles in pathogenesis have remained poorly understood due to a paucity of robust phenotypes in standard virulence assays. Here we use a generic 'dual RNA-seq' approach to profile RNA expression simultaneously in pathogen and host during Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection and reveal the molecular impact of bacterial riboregulators. We identify a PhoP-activated small RNA, PinT, which upon bacterial internalization temporally controls the expression of both invasion-associated effectors and virulence genes required for intracellular survival. This riboregulatory activity causes pervasive changes in coding and noncoding transcripts of the host. Interspecies correlation analysis links PinT to host cell JAK-STAT signalling, and we identify infection-specific alterations in multiple long noncoding RNAs. Our study provides a paradigm for a sensitive RNA-based analysis of intracellular bacterial pathogens and their hosts without physical separation, as well as a new discovery route for hidden functions of pathogen genes.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation -- Genetics ; Host-Pathogen Interactions -- Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Untranslated -- Genetics ; Salmonella Typhimurium -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00280836
    E-ISSN: 1476-4687
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  • 4
    In: PLoS ONE, 2015, Vol.10(11)
    Description: Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum FZB42 is a representative of Gram-positive plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) that inhabit plant root environments. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms of bacteria-plant symbiosis, we have systematically analyzed the primary transcriptome of strain FZB42 grown under rhizosphere-mimicking conditions using differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq). Our analysis revealed 4,877 transcription start sites for protein-coding genes, identified genes differentially expressed under different growth conditions, and corrected many previously mis-annotated genes. We also identified a large number of riboswitches and cis- encoded antisense RNAs, as well as trans- encoded small noncoding RNAs that may play important roles in the gene regulation of Bacillus . Overall, our analyses provided a landscape of Bacillus primary transcriptome and improved the knowledge of rhizobacteria-host interactions.
    Keywords: Research Article
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 5
    In: Molecular Microbiology, January 2009, Vol.71(1), pp.1-11
    Description: species are enterobacterial pathogens that have been exceptionally well investigated with respect to virulence mechanisms, microbial pathogenesis, genome evolution and many fundamental pathways of gene expression and metabolism. While these studies have traditionally focused on protein functions, has also become a model organism for RNA‐mediated regulation. The present review is dedicated to the non‐coding RNA world of : it covers small RNAs (sRNAs) that act as post‐transcriptional regulators of gene expression, novel Salmonella ‐regulatory RNA elements that sense metabolite and metal ion concentrations (or temperature), and globally acting RNA‐binding proteins such as CsrA or Hfq (inactivation of which cause drastic phenotypes and virulence defects). Owing to mosaic genome structure, some of the sRNAs are widely conserved in bacteria whereas others are very specific to species. Intriguingly, sRNAs of either type (CsrB/C, InvR, SgrS) facilitate cross‐talk between the core genome and its laterally acquired virulence regions. Work in also identified physiological functions (and mechanisms thereof) of RNA that had remained unknown in , and pioneered the use of high‐throughput sequencing technology to identify the sRNA and mRNA targets of bacterial RNA‐binding proteins.
    Keywords: Metabolites ; Proteins ; Messenger Rna ; Salmonella ; Gene Expression;
    ISSN: 0950-382X
    E-ISSN: 1365-2958
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Research in Microbiology, 2009, Vol.160(4), pp.278-287
    Description: Small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs), often in conjunction with Hfq protein, have increasingly been shown to regulate multiple rather than individual mRNAs, thereby reprogramming gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. This review summarizes how and when several such regulators (CyaR, DsrA, GcvB, OmrAB, RNAIII, RybB, RyhB) act upon multiple targets.
    Keywords: Noncoding Rnas ; RNA Chaperone Hfq ; Dsra ; Ryhb ; Rnaiii ; ABC Transport Systems ; Iron Homeostasis ; Outer Membrane Proteins ; Virulence Factors ; Salmonella ; Stapylococcus Aureus ; Biology
    ISSN: 0923-2508
    E-ISSN: 1769-7123
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Current Opinion in Microbiology, 2006, Vol.9(6), pp.605-611
    Description: Recent systematic genome searches revealed that bacteria encode a tremendous number of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs). Whereas most of these molecules remain of unknown function, it has become increasingly clear that many of them will act to modulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Where studied in more detail, sRNAs have often been found to control the expression of outer membrane proteins (OMPs). Enterobacteria such as and are now known to encode at least eight OMP-regulating sRNAs (InvR, MicA, MicC, MicF, OmrAB, RseX and RybB). These sRNAs exert their functions under a variety of growth and stress conditions, including the σ -mediated envelope stress response. An sRNA–OMP network is emerging in which some sRNAs act specifically on a single mRNA, whereas others control multiple mRNA targets.
    Keywords: Biology
    ISSN: 1369-5274
    E-ISSN: 1879-0364
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Molecular Cell, 2008, Vol.32(6), pp.827-837
    Description: Small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) have predominantly been shown to repress bacterial mRNAs by masking the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) or AUG start codon sequence, thereby preventing 30S ribosome entry and, consequently, translation initiation. However, many recently identified sRNAs lack obvious SD and AUG complementarity, indicating that sRNA-mediated translational control could also take place at other mRNA sites. We report that RybB sRNA represses mRNA translation by pairing with the 5′ coding region. Results of systematic antisense interference with 30S binding to and unrelated mRNAs suggest that sRNAs can act as translational repressors by sequestering sequences within the mRNA down to the fifth codon, even without SD and AUG start codon pairing. This “five codon window” for translational control in the 5′ coding region of mRNA not only has implications for sRNA target predictions but might also apply to -regulatory systems such as RNA thermosensors and riboswitches.
    Keywords: RNA ; Microbio ; Biology
    ISSN: 1097-2765
    E-ISSN: 1097-4164
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: PLoS Genetics, 2008, Vol.4(8), p.e1000163
    Description: Recent advances in high-throughput pyrosequencing (HTPS) technology now allow a thorough analysis of RNA bound to cellular proteins, and, therefore, of post-transcriptional regulons. We used HTPS to discover the Salmonella RNAs that are targeted by the common bacterial Sm-like protein, Hfq. Initial transcriptomic analysis revealed that Hfq controls the expression of almost a fifth of all Salmonella genes, including several horizontally acquired pathogenicity islands (SPI-1, -2, -4, -5), two sigma factor regulons, and the flagellar gene cascade. Subsequent HTPS analysis of 350,000 cDNAs, derived from RNA co-immunoprecipitation (coIP) with epitope-tagged Hfq or control coIP, identified 727 mRNAs that are Hfq-bound in vivo . The cDNA analysis discovered new, small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) and more than doubled the number of sRNAs known to be expressed in Salmonella to 64; about half of these are associated with Hfq. Our analysis explained aspects of the pleiotropic effects of Hfq loss-of-function. Specifically, we found that the mRNAs of hilD (master regulator of the SPI-1 invasion genes) and flhDC (flagellar master regulator) were bound by Hfq. We predicted that defective SPI-1 secretion and flagellar phenotypes of the hfq mutant would be rescued by overexpression of HilD and FlhDC, and we proved this to be correct. The combination of epitope-tagging and HTPS of immunoprecipitated RNA detected the expression of many intergenic chromosomal regions of Salmonella . Our approach overcomes the limited availability of high-density microarrays that have impeded expression-based sRNA discovery in microorganisms. We present a generic strategy that is ideal for the systems-level analysis of the post-transcriptional regulons of RNA-binding proteins and for sRNA discovery in a wide range of bacteria. ; The past decade has seen small regulatory RNA become an important new mediator of bacterial mRNA regulation. This study describes a rapid way to identify novel sRNAs that are expressed, and should prove relevant to a variety of bacteria. We purified the epitope-tagged RNA-binding protein, Hfq, and its bound RNA by immunoprecipitation from the model pathogen, serovar Typhimurium. This new strategy used Next Generation pyrosequencing to identify 727 Hfq-bound mRNAs. The numbers of sRNAs expressed in was doubled to 64; half are associated with Hfq. We defined the exact coordinates of sRNAs, and confirmed that they are expressed at significant levels. We also determined the Hfq regulon in , and reported the role of Hfq in controlling transcription of major pathogenicity islands, horizontally acquired regions, and the flagellar cascade. Hfq is reported to be a global regulator that affects the expression of almost a fifth of all genes. Our new approach will allow sRNAs and mRNAs to be characterized from different genetic backgrounds, or from bacteria grown under particular environmental conditions. It will be valuable to scientists working on genetically tractable bacteria who are interested in the function of RNA-binding proteins and the identification of sRNAs.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biochemistry -- Bioinformatics ; Genetics And Genomics -- Functional Genomics ; Genetics And Genomics -- Gene Expression ; Microbiology ; Microbiology -- Microbial Evolution And Genomics
    ISSN: 1553-7390
    E-ISSN: 1553-7404
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Molecular microbiology, December 2007, Vol.66(5), pp.1174-91
    Description: The Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI-1) encodes approximately 35 proteins involved in assembly of a type III secretion system (T3SS) which endows Salmonella with the ability to invade eukaryotic cells. We have discovered a novel SPI-1 gene, invR, which expresses an abundant small non-coding RNA (sRNA). The invR gene, which we identified in a global search for new Salmonella sRNA genes, is activated by the major SPI-1 transcription factor, HilD, under conditions that favour host cell invasion. The RNA chaperone, Hfq, is essential for the in vivo stability of the approximately 80 nt InvR RNA. Hfq binds InvR with high affinity in vitro, and InvR co-immunoprecipitates with FLAG epitope-tagged Hfq in Salmonella extracts. Surprisingly, deletion/overexpression of invR revealed no phenotype in SPI-1 regulation. In contrast, we find that InvR represses the synthesis of the abundant OmpD porin encoded by the Salmonella core genome. As invR is conserved in the early branching Salmonella bongori, we speculate that porin repression by InvR may have aided successful establishment of the SPI-1 T3SS after horizontal acquisition in the Salmonella lineage. This study identifies the first regulatory RNA of an enterobacterial pathogenicity island, and new roles for Hfq and HilD in SPI-1 gene expression.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial ; Porins -- Biosynthesis ; RNA, Untranslated -- Metabolism ; Salmonella -- Genetics
    ISSN: 0950-382X
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