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  • Risk Assessment
  • Colloids
  • AGRIS (United Nations, Food and Agriculture Organization)  (2)
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of environmental quality, 2009, Vol.38(3), pp.933-9
    Description: Liming is a common technique suggested for the stabilization of shooting range sites. We investigated the effect of an increase in pH on the mobilization of soluble and dispersible (colloidal) Pb, As, and Sb. Our hypothesis was that the addition of divalent cations counteracts the pH-induced mobilization of soluble and colloidal metal(loid)s. We determined soluble (operationally defined as the fraction 〈 10 nm obtained after centrifugation) and dispersible (filter cut-off 1200 nm) As, Pb, Sb, Fe, and C(org) concentrations in the filtered suspensions of batch extracts of topsoil samples (C(org): 8%) from a former shooting range site following a pH increase to values between 3.5 and 7 by adding a monovalent (KOH) or a divalent (Ca(OH)(2)) base. In the Ca(OH)(2)-treated samples, dissolved metal(loid) concentrations were 62 to 98% lower than those titrated with KOH to similar pH. Similarly, Ca reduced the concentration of dispersible Pb by 95%, but had little or no impact on dispersible As and Sb. We conclude that the counterion valency controls the mobility of metal(loid)s by affecting the mobility and sorption capacity of the sorbents (e.g., colloids, organic matter).
    Keywords: Antimony -- Chemistry ; Arsenic -- Chemistry ; Cations, Divalent -- Chemistry ; Lead -- Chemistry ; Soil -- Analysis
    ISSN: 0047-2425
    E-ISSN: 15372537
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of environmental quality, 2007, Vol.36(4), pp.1187-93
    Description: Drying of soil may increase the hydrophobicity of soil and affect the mobilization of colloids after re-wetting. Results of previous research suggest that colloid hydrophobicity is an important parameter in controlling the retention of colloids and colloid-associated substances in soils. We tested the hypothesis that air-drying of soil samples increases the hydrophobicity of water-dispersible colloids and whether air-drying affects the mobilization of colloid-associated heavy metals. We performed batch experiments with field-moist and air-dried (25 degrees C) soils from a former sewage farm (sandy loam), a municipal park (loamy sand), and a shooting range site (loamy sand with 25% C(org)). The filtered suspensions (〈1.2 microm) were analyzed for concentrations of dissolved and colloidal organic C and heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn), average colloid size, zeta potential, and turbidity. The hydrophobicity of colloids was determined by their partitioning between a hydrophobic solid and a hydrophilic aqueous phase. Drying increased hydrophobicity of the solid phase but did not affect the hydrophobicity of the dispersed colloids. Drying decreased the amount of mobilized mineral and (organo-)mineral colloids in the sewage farm soils but increased the mobilization of organic colloids in the C-rich shooting range soil. Dried samples released less colloid-bound Cd and Zn than field-moist samples. Drying-induced mobilization of dissolved organic C caused a redistribution of Cu from the colloidal to the dissolved phase. We conclude that drying-induced colloid mobilization is not caused by a change in the physicochemical properties of the colloids. Therefore, it is likely that the mobilization of colloids in the field is caused by increasing shear forces or the disintegration of aggregates.
    Keywords: Desiccation ; Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions ; Colloids -- Chemistry ; Metals, Heavy -- Analysis ; Soil -- Analysis
    ISSN: 0047-2425
    E-ISSN: 15372537
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
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