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  • Rivers
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Applied Ecology, 1 August 2011, Vol.48(4), pp.916-925
    Description: 1. Shoreline development and the associated loss of littoral habitats represent a pervasive alteration of the ecological integrity of lakes and have been identified as major drivers for the loss of littoral biodiversity world-wide. Little is known about the effects of shoreline development on the structure of, and energy transfer in, littoral food webs, even though this information is urgently needed for management and mitigation measures. 2. We measured macroinvertebrate biomass and analysed potential food resources using stable isotopes (δ¹³C, δ¹⁵N) and mixing models to compare the complexity and the trophic base of littoral food webs between undeveloped and developed shorelines in three North German lowland lakes. 3. The lower diversity of littoral habitats found at developed shorelines was associated with lower diversity of food resources and consumers. Consequently, the number of trophic links in food webs at developed shorelines was up to one order of magnitude lower as compared with undeveloped shorelines. 4. Mixing model analysis showed that consumer biomass at undeveloped shorelines was mainly derived from the particulate organic matter (FPOM) and coarse particulate organic matter of terrestrial origin (CPOM). The contribution of CPOM to consumer biomass was twofold lower at developed shorelines, and consumer biomass was mainly derived from FPOM and suspended particulate organic matter. 5. Synthesis and application. Shoreline development impacts the flow of organic matter within littoral food webs primarily through the reduction in littoral habitat diversity. These effects are exacerbated by clearcutting of the riparian vegetation, which disrupts cross-boundary couplings between the riparian and the littoral zone. Lakeshore conservation should focus on preserving the structural integrity of the littoral zone, while restoration of coarse woody debris, reed and root habitats can be a cost-efficient measure to improve degraded lakeshores. The local effects of shoreline development demonstrated in this study might lead to whole-lake effects, but future studies are needed to derive thresholds at which shoreline development has consequences for the structure and functioning of the entire ecosystem.
    Keywords: Vegetation and Community ecology
    ISSN: 00218901
    E-ISSN: 13652664
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  • 2
    In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (Journal canadien des sciences halieutiques et aquatiques), 2011, Vol.68(1), pp.74-88
    Description: We compared the invertebrate production and stable isotope signatures of key ecosystem compartments of urban sites subjected to the input of tertiary-treated wastewater with those of upstream sites in an agricultural lowland stream. We detected a significant shift in the trophic basis of invertebrate production from upstream, natural and agricultural resources, to urban resources, i.e., wastewater-derived organic matter as well as autochthonous primary production based on wastewater-derived nutrients. Invertebrate production was higher at urban sites than at agricultural sites. However, the median contribution of the most important secondary producer, the shredder Gammarus roeseli , to total invertebrate production was lower at urban sites (9%) than at agricultural sites (61%). The low production of G. roeseli at urban sites was associated with the absence of allochthonous coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) habitats, rather than the loss of CPOM as a food resource. Our results suggest that contemporary urban stressors in developed countries affect secondary producers less severely than historically recorded, but still profoundly change the matter fluxes and ecosystem functioning of running waters. Restoration of the native riparian vegetation, channel naturalization, and adequate dilution of tertiary-treated wastewater may partially mitigate adverse effects on invertebrate communities and their secondary production.
    Description: Nous comparons la production d'invertbrs et les signatures d'isotopes stables de compartiments cls de l'cosystme dans des sites urbains soumis l'apport d'eaux uses de traitement tertiaire par comparaison des sites d'amont dans un cours d'eau agricole de plaine. Nous dtectons un changement significatif dans la base trophique de la production d'invertbrs, partir des ressources naturelles et agricoles en amont vers des ressources urbaines, c'est--dire de la matire organique drive des eaux uses, ainsi qu'une production primaire autochtone base sur des nutriments provenant des eaux uses. La production d'invertbrs est plus leve dans les sites urbains que dans les sites agricoles. Cependant, la contribution mdiane du producteur secondaire le plus important, le dchiqueteur Gammarus roeseli , la production totale des invertbrs est plus basse aux sites urbains (9 %) qu'aux sites agricoles (61 %). La faible production de G. roeseli aux sites urbains est associe l'absence d'habitats matire organique particulaire grossire (CPOM) allochtone, plutt qu' la perte de CPOM comme ressource alimentaire. Nos rsultats laissent croire que les facteurs urbains actuels de stress dans les pays dvelopps affectent les producteurs secondaires moins svrement que signal dans le pass, mais qu'ils modifient nanmoins profondment les flux de matire et le fonctionnement de l'cosystme dans les eaux courantes. La restauration de la vgtation riveraine indigne, la naturalisation du chenal et la dilution adquate des eaux uses aprs un traitement tertiaire peuvent en partie rduire les effets ngatifs sur les communauts d'invertbrs et leur production secondaire.
    Keywords: Rivers ; Isotopes ; Ecosystems ; Environmental Impact ; Pollution Effects ; Trophic Structure ; Particulate Organic Matter ; Freshwater Organisms ; Secondary Production ; Waste Water ; Agricultural Runoff ; Chemical Analysis ; Pollution ; Gammarus Roeseli ; Germany, Erpe R. ; Freshwater ; Mechanical and Natural Changes ; Productivity;
    ISSN: 0706-652X
    E-ISSN: 1205-7533
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Hydrobiologia, 2016, Vol.776(1), pp.51-65
    Description: This study addressed the influence of common shoreline engineering structures (off-bankline revetment, rip rap and wing dike) on richness, biomass and secondary production of native and non-native macroinvertebrates in the navigation channel and near-shore habitats in the Elbe River (Germany). Within the navigation channel, only marginal differences among engineering structures were observed, and non-native species were absent from all samples. At the shoreline, secondary production of non-native species was significantly greater at the rip rap and represented 59% of total secondary production in near-shore habitats. Conversely, secondary production of native species at the shoreline was 9-fold lower at the rip rap and more than twice the rates at the wing dike. Differences in secondary production among engineering structures were attributed to differential distribution of substrate types. Boulder substrates, the dominant substrate type in the rip rap, promoted contributions of non-native species while macrophytes and silt were associated with high contributions of native species at the off-bankline revetment. Our results reveal that the morphological configuration of engineering structures in large rivers not only controls the rate of secondary production for macroinvertebrates but also the contribution of non-native species to total community functioning.
    Keywords: Ecosystem functioning ; Elbe River ; Dikerogammarus villosus ; Neozoa ; Non-native species ; River engineering
    ISSN: 0018-8158
    E-ISSN: 1573-5117
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Hydrobiologia, 2013, Vol.717(1), pp.147-159
    Description: Reduction of flow constitutes one of the most severe human alterations to rivers, as it affects the key abiotic feature of these ecosystems. While there has been considerable progress in understanding the effects of reduced flow on benthic macroinvertebrates, cascading effects of flow reduction on dissolved oxygen concentrations (DO) have not yet received much attention. We compared the macroinvertebrate composition between reference conditions and a situation after several years of discharge reduction in the Spree River (Brandenburg, Germany). Community composition shifted from rheophilic species to species indifferent to flow conditions. Filter feeders were partially replaced by collector/gatherers, which likely reduces the retention of organic matter, and thus the self-purification capacity of the river section. These shifts were associated with low discharge during summer, cascading into daily DO concentration minima of less than 5 mg l −1 which prevailed 74% of the days in summer. This depletion of DO after flow reduction presumably caused the observed species turnover. Hence, flow reduction in lowland rivers may not only directly impair the ecological functions provided by benthic macroinvertebrates but may also act indirectly by depleting DO concentrations.
    Keywords: Low flow ; Dissolved oxygen ; Discharge ; Functional feeding groups ; Flow preferences ; Spree River
    ISSN: 0018-8158
    E-ISSN: 1573-5117
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Environmental science & technology, 17 July 2018, Vol.52(14), pp.7962-7971
    Description: Agricultural and urban land use has dramatically increased over the last century and one consequence is the release of anthropogenic chemicals into aquatic ecosystems. One of the rarely studied consequences is the effect of land use change on internal concentrations of organic micropollutants (OMPs) in aquatic invertebrates and its effects on their genotype diversity. Here, we applied population genetic and internal concentrations of OMPs analyses to determine evolutionary implications of chemical pollution on Gammarus pulex populations from a natural and two agricultural streams. Along 14 consecutive months sampled, 26 different OMPs were quantified in G. pulex extracts with the highest number, concentration, and toxic pressure in the anthropogenically stressed stream ecosystems. Our results indicate distinct internal OMP profiles and changes in both genetic variation and genetic structure in streams affected by anthropogenic activity. Genetic variation was attributed to chemical pollution whereas changes in the genetic structure were attributed to environmental disturbances, such as changes in discharge in the impacted stream ecosystems, which worked both independently and in tandem. Finally, we conclude that human-impacted streams are subjected to severe alterations in their population genetic patterns compared to nonimpacted stream ecosystems.
    Keywords: Ecosystem ; Rivers
    ISSN: 0013936X
    E-ISSN: 1520-5851
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 2015, Vol.22(13), pp.9864-9876
    Description: The aim of this study was to assess land use effects on the density, biomass, and instantaneous secondary production (IP) of benthic invertebrates in a fifth-order tropical river. Invertebrates were sampled at 11 stations along the Rio das Mortes (upper Rio Grande, Southeast Brazil) in the dry and the rainy season 2010/2011. Invertebrates were counted, determined, and measured to estimate their density, biomass, and IP. Water chemical characteristics, sediment heterogeneity, and habitat structural integrity were assessed in parallel. Total invertebrate density, biomass, and IP were higher in the dry season than those in the rainy season, but did not differ significantly among sampling stations along the river. However, taxon-specific density, biomass, and IP differed similarly among sampling stations along the river and between seasons, suggesting that these metrics had the same bioindication potential. Variability in density, biomass, and IP was mainly explained by seasonality and the percentage of sandy sediment in the riverbed, and not directly by urban or agricultural land use. Our results suggest that the consistently high degradation status of the river, observed from its headwaters to mouth, weakened the response of the invertebrate community to specific land use impacts, so that only local habitat characteristics and seasonality exerted effects.
    Keywords: Benthic community ; Ecosystem processes ; Land use impacts ; Agriculture ; Urbanization ; Bioindication
    ISSN: 0944-1344
    E-ISSN: 1614-7499
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Hydrobiologia, 2019, Vol.841(1), p.121(11)
    Description: The role of hydromorphological degradation and temporal variation for food webs in human-modified rivers is still not fully evaluated. We tested the hypothesis that man-made engineering structures alter macroinvertebrate resource use in the Elbe River (Germany) in relation to seasonal variation. Stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) and mixing models revealed that dietary contributions of benthic organic matter (BOM) and phytoplankton were driven by engineering structure. Contributions of biofilm were driven by season, while contributions of terrestrial particulate organic matter (t-POM) were driven by both engineering structure and season. Contributions of t-POM were larger than those of phytoplankton in spring and summer, but not in autumn, which adds to the debate about the sources of organic matter fuelling riverine benthic food webs. Resource availability was not systematically related to resource use, indicating that factors other than resource limitation were responsible for the observed results. By demonstrating that human alterations determine consumer resource use independently from resource availability, our study links hydromorphological modifications to fluxes of matter in riverine food webs. Future studies should quantify organic matter fluxes from various autochthonous and allochthonous pathways in human-modified and natural rivers to allow for a robust synthesis of how hydromorphological modifications alter benthic food webs.
    Keywords: Life Sciences ; Freshwater & Marine Ecology ; Ecology ; Zoology ; Elbe River ; Food Web ; Stable Isotopes ; Mixing Model ; Non-Native Species ; River Engineering ; Biology ; Oceanography ; Zoology ; Ecology;
    ISSN: 0018-8158
    E-ISSN: 15735117
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 2013, Vol.185(11), pp.9221-9236
    Description: The Bode catchment (Germany) shows strong land use gradients from forested parts of the National Park (23 % of total land cover) to agricultural (70 %) and urbanised areas (7 %). It is part of the Terrestrial Environmental Observatories of the German Helmholtz association. We performed a biogeochemical analysis of the entire river network. Surface water was sampled at 21 headwaters and at ten downstream sites, before (in early spring) and during the growing season (in late summer). Many parameters showed lower concentrations in headwaters than in downstream reaches, among them nutrients (ammonium, nitrate and phosphorus), dissolved copper and seston dry mass. Nitrate and phosphorus concentrations were positively related to the proportion of agricultural area within the catchment. Punctual anthropogenic loads affected some parameters such as chloride and arsenic. Chlorophyll a concentration and total phosphorus in surface waters were positively related. The concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was higher in summer than in spring, whereas the molecular size of DOC was lower in summer. The specific UV absorption at 254 nm, indicating the content of humic substances, was higher in headwaters than in downstream reaches and was positively related to the proportion of forest within the catchment. CO 2 oversaturation of the water was higher downstream compared with headwaters and was higher in summer than in spring. It was correlated negatively with oxygen saturation and positively with DOC concentration but negatively with DOC quality (molecular size and humic content). A principle component analysis clearly separated the effects of site (44 %) and season (15 %), demonstrating the strong effect of land use on biogeochemical parameters.
    Keywords: TERENO ; Land use ; Nutrients ; Heavy metals ; DOC ; Bode
    ISSN: 0167-6369
    E-ISSN: 1573-2959
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Water Research, 01 November 2019, Vol.164
    Description: Fluvial networks are globally relevant for the processing of dissolved organic matter (DOM). To investigate the change in molecular DOM diversity along the river course, high-field FTICR mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy of riverine DOM as well as bacterial abundance and activity were measured in a third order stream along a land-use gradient from pristine, agricultural to urban landscapes. DOM composition showed a clear evolution along the river course with an initial decrease of average oxidation and unsaturation followed by an increased relative abundance of CHNO and CHOS compounds introduced by agriculture and waste water, respectively. DOM composition was dominated by rather unsaturated CHO compounds (H/C ≤ 1) in headwaters and by more aliphatic molecules at downstream sites. Oxygenated functional groups shifted from aromatic ethers and hydroxyl groups to aliphatic carboxylic acids and aliphatic hydroxyl groups. This massive dislocation of oxygen significantly increased the diversity of atomic environments in branched aliphatic groups from headwater to downstream DOM. Mass spectra of DOM enabled the detection of compositional relationships to bacterial abundance and activity which was positively related to more aliphatic components (H/C 〉 1) and negatively related to unsaturated components. FTICR mass and NMR spectra corroborated the initial decline in DOM molecular diversity predicted by the River Continuum Concept (RCC) but demonstrated an anthropogenic increase in the molecular diversity of DOM further downstream. While the high DOM molecular diversity in first order headwater streams was the result of small scale ecosystem plurality, agriculture and waste water treatment introduced many components in the lower reaches. These anthropogenic influences together with massive bacterial oxidation of DOM contributed to a growth of molecular diversity of downstream DOM whose composition and structure differed entirely from those found in pristine headwaters.
    Keywords: DOM ; Fticr MS ; NMR ; Stream ; Wwtp ; Bacterial Production ; Biofilm ; Engineering
    ISSN: 0043-1354
    E-ISSN: 1879-2448
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