Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • Rivers
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, July-August, 2004, Vol.130(4), p.301(10)
    Description: Declining fall flows are limiting the ability of the Cosumnes River to support large fall runs of Chinook salmon. Management scenarios linking surface water and groundwater alternatives to provide sufficient fall flows are examined using groundwater flow and channel routing models. Results show that groundwater overdraft in the basin has converted the river to a predominantly losing stream, practically eliminating base flows. Management alternatives to increase net recharge (for example, pumping reductions) were examined along with surface water augmentation options. Using a minimum depth standard for fish passage, average surface water flow deficits were computed for the migration period of Chinook salmon. Groundwater deficits were evaluated by comparing simulated current groundwater conditions with conditions under various scenarios. Increases in net recharge on the order of 200 to 300 million [m.sup.3]/year would be required to reconnect the regional aquifer with the channel and in turn reestablish perennial base flows. Options that combine surface water augmentation with groundwater management are most likely to ensure sufficient river flows in the short term and to support long-term restoration of regional groundwater levels. CE Database subject headings: Surface waters; Ground water; Restoration; California; Rivers; Base flow.
    Keywords: Surface Water -- Reports ; Groundwater Overdraft
    ISSN: 0733-9496
    E-ISSN: 19435452
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Water Research, 01 March 2018, Vol.130, pp.185-199
    Description: Nitrate contamination in ground- and surface water is a persistent problem in countries with intense agriculture. The transition zone between rivers and their riparian aquifers, where river water and groundwater interact, may play an important role in mediating nitrate exports, as it can facilitate intensive denitrification, which permanently removes nitrate from the aquatic system. However, the in-situ factors controlling riparian denitrification are not fully understood, as they are often strongly linked and their effects superimpose each other. In this study, we present the evaluation of hydrochemical and isotopic data from a 2-year sampling period of river water and groundwater in the riparian zone along a 3rd order river in Central Germany. Based on bi- and multivariate statistics (Spearman's rank correlation and partial least squares regression) we can show, that highest rates for oxygen consumption and denitrification in the riparian aquifer occur where the fraction of infiltrated river water and at the same time groundwater temperature, are high. River discharge and depth to groundwater are additional explanatory variables for those reaction rates, but of minor importance. Our data and analyses suggest that at locations in the riparian aquifer, which show significant river water infiltration, heterotrophic microbial reactions in the riparian zone may be fueled by bioavailable organic carbon derived from the river water. We conclude that interactions between rivers and riparian groundwater are likely to be a key control of nitrate removal and should be considered as a measure to mitigate high nitrate exports from agricultural catchments.
    Keywords: Riparian Zone ; Nitrate Contamination ; Nitrate Stable Isotopes ; River-Groundwater Interaction ; Denitrification ; Engineering
    ISSN: 0043-1354
    E-ISSN: 1879-2448
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Hydrology, 13 February 2014, Vol.509, pp.601-614
    Description: An important prerequisite to better understand the transport of nutrients and contaminants across the river-aquifer interface and possible implications for biogeochemical transformations is to accurately characterize and asses the exchange fluxes. In this study we investigate how monsoonal precipitation events and the resulting variability in river discharge affect the dynamics of river-aquifer exchange and the corresponding flux rates. We evaluate potential impacts of the investigated exchange fluxes on local water quality. Hydraulic gradients along a piezometer transect were monitored at a river reach in a small catchment in South Korea, where the hydrologic dynamics are driven by the East-Asian Monsoon. We used heat as a tracer to constrain river-aquifer exchange fluxes in a two-dimensional flow and heat transport model implemented in the numerical code HydroGeoSphere, which was calibrated to the measured temperature and total head data. To elucidate potential effects of river-aquifer exchange dynamics on biogeochemical transformations at the river-aquifer interface, river water and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrate (NO ) and dissolved oxygen saturation (DO ). Our results illustrate highly variable hydrologic conditions during the monsoon season characterized by temporal and spatial variability in river-aquifer exchange fluxes with frequent flow reversals (changes between gaining and losing conditions). Intense monsoonal precipitation events and the associated rapid changes in river stage are the dominant driver for the observed riverbed flow reversals. The chemical data suggest that the flow reversals, when river water high in DOC is pushed into the nitrate-rich groundwater below the stream and subsequently returns to the stream may facilitate and enhance the natural attenuation of nitrate in the shallow groundwater.
    Keywords: River-Aquifer Exchange Fluxes ; Heat As a Natural Tracer ; Monsoonal-Type Climate ; Hydraulic Gradient Reversals ; Hydrogeosphere ; Natural Attenuation of Nitrate ; Geography
    ISSN: 0022-1694
    E-ISSN: 1879-2707
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Hydrology, 28 June 2013, Vol.494, pp.72-82
    Description: River discharge is a commonly measured hydrologic variable; however, estimate uncertainty is often higher than acceptable limits. To quantify method limitations and spatiotemporal variability, a multi-year hydrologic flow partitioning investigation was completed under monsoonal conditions in the ungauged complex terrain of the Haean Catchment, South Korea. Our results indicate that sediment transport from a single annual monsoonal event can significantly modify the channel cross-sectional area resulting in inaccurate stage-discharge rating curves. We compare six discharge measurement methods at 13 locations that vary in slope from 1% to 80%, with discharge ranging up to four orders in magnitude, which enabled us to weight the accuracy of each method over a specific range in discharge. The most accurate discharge estimation methods are the weir, the acoustic Doppler current profiler, and the in-stream velocity area method; however, under certain conditions each of these methods is less desirable than other methods. The uncertainty in the three methods is on average 0.4%, 4.7%, and 6.1% of the total discharge, respectively. The accuracy of the discharge estimates has a direct influence on the characterization of basin-wide hydrologic partitioning, which can lead to significant variability in sediment erosion rates and nutrient fate and transport.
    Keywords: Terreco ; Korea ; Discharge ; Baseflow ; Topography ; River ; Geography
    ISSN: 0022-1694
    E-ISSN: 1879-2707
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    In: Water Resources Research, January 2017, Vol.53(1), pp.779-798
    Description: In this study, we investigate the impact of single stream discharge events on water exchange, solute transport, and reactions in the hyporheic zone below a natural in‐stream gravel bar. We set up a reactive transport groundwater model with streamflow scenarios that vary by event duration and peak discharge. A steady ambient groundwater flow field is assumed that results in losing, neutral, or gaining stream conditions depending on the stream stage. Across the streambed dissolved oxygen, organic carbon, and nitrate are transported into the subsurface. Additional nitrate is received from upwelling groundwater. Aerobic respiration and denitrification are simulated for scenarios with different stream solute concentrations. Results show that hyporheic exchange flux, solute transport, and consumption increase during events. However, their intensities depend highly on the interplay between event characteristics and ambient groundwater conditions. During events where reversals in the hydraulic gradient occur stream water and solutes infiltrate deeper into the aquifer where they have more time to react. For those events, the reactive efficiency of the hyporheic zone (solute consumption as fraction of influx) for aerobic respiration and denitrification is up to 2.7 and 10 times higher compared to base flow conditions. The fraction of stream nitrate load consumed in the hyporheic zone increases with stream discharge (up to 150 mg/m/h), but remains below the value under base flow conditions for weak events. Events also increase denitrification of groundwater borne nitrate, but groundwater nitrate flux to the stream decreases by up to 33% due to temporary gradient reversals. Transient reactive transport groundwater model of the hyporheic zone for various single discharge events Aerobic respiration and denitrification occur at different timing and locations in the hyporheic zone Reversal in hydraulic gradient direction (gaining to neutral to losing) significantly increases reactive efficiency
    Keywords: Hyporheic Zone ; Discharge Events ; Transient Groundwater Model ; Reactive Transport ; Denitrification
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Environmental science & technology, 03 September 2013, Vol.47(17), pp.9858-65
    Description: One of the key environmental conditions controlling biogeochemical reactions in aquatic sediments like streambeds is the distribution of dissolved oxygen. We present a novel approach for the in situ measurement of vertical oxygen profiles using a planar luminescence-based optical sensor. The instrument consists of a transparent acrylic tube with the oxygen-sensitive layer mounted on the outside. The luminescence is excited and detected by a moveable piston inside the acrylic tube. Since no moving parts are in contact with the streambed, the disturbance of the subsurface flow field is minimized. The precision of the distributed oxygen sensor (DOS) was assessed by a comparison with spot optodes. Although the precision of the DOS, expressed as standard deviation of calculated oxygen air saturation, is lower (0.2-6.2%) compared to spot optodes (〈0.1-0.6%), variations of the oxygen content along the profile can be resolved. The uncertainty of the calculated oxygen is assessed with a Monte Carlo uncertainty assessment. The obtained vertical oxygen profiles of 40 cm in length reveal variations of the oxygen content reaching from 90% to 0% air saturation and are characterized by patches of low oxygen rather than a continuous decrease with depth.
    Keywords: Environmental Monitoring -- Methods ; Oxygen -- Analysis ; Rivers -- Chemistry
    ISSN: 0013936X
    E-ISSN: 1520-5851
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    In: Water Resources Research, March 2018, Vol.54(3), pp.2317-2335
    Description: The analysis of transit/residence time distributions (TTDs and RTDs) provides important insights into the dynamics of stream‐water ages and subsurface mixing. These insights have significant implications for water quality. For a small agricultural catchment in central Germany, we use a 3D fully coupled surface‐subsurface hydrological model to simulate water flow and perform particle tracking to determine flow paths and transit times. The TTDs of discharge, RTDs of storage and fractional StorAge Selection (fSAS) functions are computed and analyzed on daily basis for a period of 10 years. Results show strong seasonal fluctuations of the median transit time of discharge and the median residence time, with the former being strongly related to the catchment wetness. Computed fSAS functions suggest systematic shifts of the discharge selection preference over four main periods: In the wet period, the youngest water in storage is preferentially selected, and this preference shifts gradually toward older ages of stored water when the catchment transitions into the drying, dry and wetting periods. These changes are driven by distinct shifts in the dominance of deeper flow paths and fast shallow flow paths. Changes in the shape of the fSAS functions can be captured by changes in the two parameters of the approximating Beta distributions, allowing the generation of continuous fSAS functions representing the general catchment behavior. These results improve our understanding of the seasonal dynamics of TTDs and fSAS functions for a complex real‐world catchment and are important for interpreting solute export to the stream in a spatially implicit manner. Transit times of discharge strongly related to storage Strong seasonality in discharge selection preference Seasonally changing SAS functions are well captured by Beta distributions
    Keywords: Transit Time ; Subsurface Mixing ; Sas Functions
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    In: Ecohydrology, January 2016, Vol.9(1), pp.93-100
    Description: We investigated changes in respiration across nighttime and daytime in a headwater stream. For this, we conducted consecutive nighttime and daytime experiments injecting the bioreactive tracer resazurin in two reaches with different riparian canopy densities (different levels of photosynthetically active radiation) to compare respiration rate coefficients. We found that even though stream water temperatures measured above the streambed at day and night (half‐day timescale) were different within each reach and across reaches (95% confidence level), apparent respiration rate coefficients were not different across nighttime and daytime conditions (95% confidence level). A likely explanation for this is that the bulk of stream respiration takes place in the hyporheic zone, where diel fluctuations of stream temperature and photosynthetically active radiation are considerably attenuated and where temperature is not measured in routine investigations of stream metabolism. Our results suggest that community respiration in headwater streams may not need to be ‘corrected’ for temperature between daytime and nighttime, even though instantaneous changes in respiration are expected to occur from a pure biological perspective. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Keywords: Community Respiration ; Resazurin ; Smart Tracers ; Diel Fluctuations ; Headwater Stream ; Hyporheic Zone ; Stream Temperature ; Stream Metabolism
    ISSN: 1936-0584
    E-ISSN: 1936-0592
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    In: Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, August 2016, Vol.121(8), pp.2199-2215
    Description: Aerobic respiration is an important component of in‐stream metabolism. The larger part occurs in the streambed, where it is difficult to directly determine actual respiration rates. Existing methods for determining respiration are based on indirect estimates from whole‐stream metabolism or provide time invariant results estimated from oxygen consumption measurements in enclosed chambers that do not account for the influence of hydrological changes. In this study we demonstrate a simple method for determining time‐variable hyporheic respiration. We use a windowed cross‐correlation approach for deriving time‐variable travel times from the naturally changing electrical conductivity signal that is transferred into the sediment. By combining the results with continuous in situ dissolved oxygen measurements, variable oxygen consumption rate coefficients in the streambed are obtained. An empirical temperature relationship is derived and used for standardizing the respiration rate coefficients to isothermal conditions. For demonstrating the method, we compare two independent measurement spots in the streambed, which were located upstream and downstream of an in‐stream gravel bar and thus exposed strongly diverse travel times. The derived respiration rate results are in accordance with findings of other stream studies. By comparing the travel time and respiration rate coefficient (i.e., Damköhler number) we estimate the contribution of each to the oxygen consumption in the streambed. An in situ method for estimation of streambed respiration Natural variations of EC can be used for deriving time‐variable travel times Respiration is equally influenced by temperature and hydrological dynamics
    Keywords: Respiration ; Streambed ; Oxygen ; Electrical Conductivity ; Cross Correlation
    ISSN: 2169-8953
    E-ISSN: 2169-8961
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Ecosystems, 2015, Vol.18(6), pp.1101-1120
    Description: Denitrification is the main process removing nitrate in river drainage basins and buffer input from agricultural land and limits aquatic ecosystem pollution. However, the identification of denitrification hotspots (for example, riparian...
    Keywords: Environmental Sciences ; Biodiversity and Ecology ; Denitrification ; Biogeochemical Hotspot ; Upscaling ; Residence Time Distribution ; Damköhler Ratio ; Diffuse Pollution Control ; Environmental Sciences ; Ecology
    ISSN: 1432-9840
    E-ISSN: 1435-0629
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages