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  • 1
    In: EMBO Journal, 03 June 2015, Vol.34(11), pp.1478-1492
    Description: There is an expanding list of examples by which one can posttranscriptionally influence the expression of others. This can involve sponges that sequester regulatory s of s in the same regulon, but the underlying molecular mechanism of such cross talk remains little understood. Here, we report sponge‐mediated cross talk in the posttranscriptional network of GcvB, a conserved Hfq‐dependent small with one of the largest regulons known in bacteria. We show that decay from the locus encoding an amino acid transporter generates a stable fragment (SroC) that base‐pairs with GcvB. This interaction triggers the degradation of GcvB by ase E, alleviating the GcvB‐mediated repression of other amino acid‐related transport and metabolic genes. Intriguingly, since the itself is a target of GcvB, the SroC sponge seems to enable both an internal feed‐forward loop to activate its parental in and activation of many ‐encoded s in the same pathway. Disabling this cross talk affects bacterial growth when peptides are the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. Decay of the bacterial GcvB , which keeps it from regulating its targets, is triggered by a 3′‐‐derived fragment from a target . This ability of s to compete for regulatory interaction presents a new mode of cross talk in bacteria. . Decay of the bacterial GcvB s, which keeps it from regulating its m targets, is triggered by a 3′‐‐derived fragment from a target m. This ability of ms to compete for regulatory interaction presents a new mode of cross talk in bacteria.
    Keywords: G Cv B ; H Fq ; Noncoding Rna ; Rn Ase E ; S Ro C
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: EMBO journal: European Molecular Biology Organization, 2015, Issue 11, pp.1478-1492
    Description: There is an expanding list of examples by which one mRNA can posttranscriptionally influence the expression of others. This can involve RNA sponges that sequester regulatory RNAs of mRNAs in the same regulon, but the underlying molecular mechanism of such mRNA cross talk remains little understood. Here, we report sponge-mediated mRNA cross talk in the posttranscriptional network of GcvB, a conserved Hfq-dependent small RNA with one of the largest regulons known in bacteria. We show that mRNA decay from the gltIJKL locus encoding an amino acid ABC transporter generates a stable fragment (SroC) that base-pairs with GcvB. This interaction triggers the degradation of GcvB by RNase E, alleviating the GcvB-mediated mRNA repression of other amino acid-related transport and metabolic genes. Intriguingly, since the gltIJKL mRNA itself is a target of GcvB, the SroC sponge seems to enable both an internal feed-forward loop to activate its parental mRNA in cis and activation of many trans-encoded mRNAs in the same pathway. Disabling this mRNA cross talk affects bacterial growth when peptides are the sole carbon and nitrogen sources.
    Keywords: Gcvb ; Hfq ; Noncoding Rna ; Rnase E ; Sroc
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    Source: Fundación Dialnet
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Molecular Cell, 04 February 2016, Vol.61(3), pp.352-363
    Description: Small RNAs (sRNAs) from conserved noncoding genes are crucial regulators in bacterial signaling pathways but have remained elusive in the Cpx response to inner membrane stress. Here we report that an alternative biogenesis pathway releasing the conserved mRNA 3′ UTR of stress chaperone CpxP as an ∼60-nt sRNA provides the noncoding arm of the Cpx response. This so-called CpxQ sRNA, generated by general mRNA decay through RNase E, acts as an Hfq-dependent repressor of multiple mRNAs encoding extracytoplasmic proteins. Both CpxQ and the Cpx pathway are required for cell survival under conditions of dissipation of membrane potential. Our discovery of CpxQ illustrates how the conversion of a transcribed 3′ UTR into an sRNA doubles the output of a single mRNA to produce two factors with spatially segregated functions during inner membrane stress: a chaperone that targets problematic proteins in the periplasm and a regulatory RNA that dampens their synthesis in the cytosol. Chao and Vogel discover that a small RNA cleaved off the 3′ end of an mRNA provides the elusive regulatory noncoding arm of the bacterial Cpx response to inner membrane stress.
    Keywords: Cpx Pathway ; Cpxp ; Cpxq ; 3′ Utr ; Hfq ; Rnase E ; Noncoding RNA ; Nhab ; Envelope Stress ; Membrane Potential ; Biology
    ISSN: 1097-2765
    E-ISSN: 1097-4164
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Molecular Cell, 05 January 2017, Vol.65(1), pp.39-51
    Description: Understanding RNA processing and turnover requires knowledge of cleavages by major endoribonucleases within a living cell. We have employed TIER-seq (transiently inactivating an endoribonuclease followed by RNA-seq) to profile cleavage products of the essential endoribonuclease RNase E in . A dominating cleavage signature is the location of a uridine two nucleotides downstream in a single-stranded segment, which we rationalize structurally as a key recognition determinant that may favor RNase E catalysis. Our results suggest a prominent biogenesis pathway for bacterial regulatory small RNAs whereby RNase E acts together with the RNA chaperone Hfq to liberate stable 3′ fragments from various precursor RNAs. Recapitulating this process in vitro, Hfq guides RNase E cleavage of a representative small-RNA precursor for interaction with a mRNA target. In vivo, the processing is required for target regulation. Our findings reveal a general maturation mechanism for a major class of post-transcriptional regulators. Chao et al. discover that the essential bacterial RNase E cleaves numerous transcripts at preferred sites by sensing uridine as a 2-nt ruler. RNase E processing of various precursor RNAs produces many small regulatory RNAs, constituting a major small-RNA biogenesis pathway in bacteria.
    Keywords: Rnase E ; RNA Degradome ; Non-Coding RNA ; Hfq ; 3′ Utr ; Arcz ; Rpra ; Srna Maturation ; Uridine Ruler ; Tier-Seq ; Biology
    ISSN: 1097-2765
    E-ISSN: 1097-4164
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  • 5
    Language: English
    In: Genes & development, 01 November 2008, Vol.22(21), pp.2914-25
    Description: Noncoding RNA regulators have been implicated in almost all imaginable cellular processes. Here we review how regulatory small RNAs such as Spot42, SgrS, GlmY, and GlmZ and a cis-encoded ribozyme in glmS mRNA control sugar metabolism. Besides discussing the physiological implications, we show how the study of these molecules contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms and of general principles of RNA-based regulation. These include the post-transcriptional repression or activation of gene expression within polycistronic mRNAs; novel ribonucleoprotein complexes composed of small RNA, Hfq, and/or RNase E; and the hierarchical action of regulatory RNAs.
    Keywords: Carbohydrate Metabolism ; Bacterial Proteins -- Metabolism ; RNA, Bacterial -- Metabolism ; RNA, Untranslated -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 0890-9369
    E-ISSN: 15495477
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