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  • Salmonella Typhimurium
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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 27 March 2012, Vol.109(13), pp.E757-64
    Description: SgrS RNA is a model for the large class of Hfq-associated small RNAs that act to posttranscriptionally regulate bacterial mRNAs. The function of SgrS is well-characterized in nonpathogenic Escherichia coli, where it was originally shown to counteract glucose-phosphate stress by acting as a repressor of the ptsG mRNA, which encodes the major glucose transporter. We have discovered additional SgrS targets in Salmonella Typhimurium, a pathogen related to E. coli that recently acquired one-quarter of all genes by horizontal gene transfer. We show that the conserved short seed region of SgrS that recognizes ptsG was recruited to target the Salmonella-specific sopD mRNA of a secreted virulence protein. The SgrS-sopD interaction is exceptionally selective; we find that sopD2 mRNA, whose gene arose from sopD duplication during Salmonella evolution, is deaf to SgrS because of a nonproductive G-U pair in the potential SgrS-sopD2 RNA duplex vs. G-C in SgrS-sopD. In other words, SgrS discriminates the two virulence factor mRNAs at the level of a single hydrogen bond. Our study suggests that bacterial pathogens use their large suites of conserved Hfq-associated regulators to integrate horizontally acquired genes into existing posttranscriptional networks, just as conserved transcription factors are recruited to tame foreign genes at the DNA level. The results graphically illustrate the importance of the seed regions of bacterial small RNAs to select new targets with high fidelity and suggest that target predictions must consider all or none decisions by individual seed nucleotides.
    Keywords: Phylogeny ; Base Pairing -- Genetics ; Gene Transfer, Horizontal -- Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; Salmonella -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 27 June 2017, Vol.114(26), pp.6824-6829
    Description: The functions of many bacterial RNA-binding proteins remain obscure because of a lack of knowledge of their cellular ligands. Although well-studied cold-shock protein A (CspA) family members are induced and function at low temperature, others are highly expressed in infection-relevant conditions. Here, we have profiled transcripts bound in vivo by the CspA family members of serovar Typhimurium to link the constitutively expressed CspC and CspE proteins with virulence pathways. Phenotypic assays in vitro demonstrated a crucial role for these proteins in membrane stress, motility, and biofilm formation. Moreover, double deletion of and fully attenuates in systemic mouse infection. In other words, the RNA ligand-centric approach taken here overcomes a problematic molecular redundancy of CspC and CspE that likely explains why these proteins have evaded selection in previous virulence factor screens in animals. Our results highlight RNA-binding proteins as regulators of pathogenicity and potential targets of antimicrobial therapy. They also suggest that globally acting RNA-binding proteins are more common in bacteria than currently appreciated.
    Keywords: RNA-Binding Protein ; Salmonella ; Bacterial Pathogenesis ; Cold-Shock Protein ; Stress Response ; Bacterial Proteins ; Cold Shock Proteins and Peptides ; Heat-Shock Proteins ; RNA-Binding Proteins ; Salmonella Infections ; Salmonella Typhimurium ; Virulence Factors
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 2011, Vol.6(3), p.e17296
    Description: P-bodies are dynamic aggregates of RNA and proteins involved in several post-transcriptional regulation processes. P-bodies have been shown to play important roles in regulating viral infection, whereas their interplay with bacterial pathogens, specifically intracellular bacteria that extensively manipulate host cell pathways, remains unknown. Here, we report that Salmonella infection induces P-body disassembly in a cell type-specific manner, and independently of previously characterized pathways such as inhibition of host cell RNA synthesis or microRNA-mediated gene silencing. We show that the Salmonella -induced P-body disassembly depends on the activation of the SPI-2 encoded type 3 secretion system, and that the secreted effector protein SpvB plays a major role in this process. P-body disruption is also induced by the related pathogen, Shigella flexneri , arguing that this might be a new mechanism by which intracellular bacterial pathogens subvert host cell function.
    Keywords: Research Article ; Biology ; Medicine ; Infectious Diseases ; Microbiology ; Molecular Biology ; Cell Biology
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Science (New York, N.Y.), 07 December 2018, Vol.362(6419), pp.1156-1160
    Description: Many bacterial infections are hard to treat and tend to relapse, possibly due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant persisters. In vitro, persister cells appear to be dormant. After uptake of species by macrophages, nongrowing persisters also occur, but their physiological state is poorly understood. In this work, we show that persisters arising during macrophage infection maintain a metabolically active state. Persisters reprogram macrophages by means of effectors secreted by the pathogenicity island 2 type 3 secretion system. These effectors dampened proinflammatory innate immune responses and induced anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization. Such reprogramming allowed nongrowing cells to survive for extended periods in their host. Persisters undermining host immune defenses might confer an advantage to the pathogen during relapse once antibiotic pressure is relieved.
    Keywords: Drug Resistance, Bacterial ; Host-Pathogen Interactions -- Immunology ; Macrophages -- Immunology ; Salmonella Infections -- Drug Therapy ; Salmonella Typhimurium -- Metabolism ; Type III Secretion Systems -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00368075
    E-ISSN: 1095-9203
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  • 5
    In: EMBO Journal, 03 June 2015, Vol.34(11), pp.1478-1492
    Description: There is an expanding list of examples by which one can posttranscriptionally influence the expression of others. This can involve sponges that sequester regulatory s of s in the same regulon, but the underlying molecular mechanism of such cross talk remains little understood. Here, we report sponge‐mediated cross talk in the posttranscriptional network of GcvB, a conserved Hfq‐dependent small with one of the largest regulons known in bacteria. We show that decay from the locus encoding an amino acid transporter generates a stable fragment (SroC) that base‐pairs with GcvB. This interaction triggers the degradation of GcvB by ase E, alleviating the GcvB‐mediated repression of other amino acid‐related transport and metabolic genes. Intriguingly, since the itself is a target of GcvB, the SroC sponge seems to enable both an internal feed‐forward loop to activate its parental in and activation of many ‐encoded s in the same pathway. Disabling this cross talk affects bacterial growth when peptides are the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. Decay of the bacterial GcvB , which keeps it from regulating its targets, is triggered by a 3′‐‐derived fragment from a target . This ability of s to compete for regulatory interaction presents a new mode of cross talk in bacteria. . Decay of the bacterial GcvB s, which keeps it from regulating its m targets, is triggered by a 3′‐‐derived fragment from a target m. This ability of ms to compete for regulatory interaction presents a new mode of cross talk in bacteria.
    Keywords: G Cv B ; H Fq ; Noncoding Rna ; Rn Ase E ; S Ro C
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 6
    Language: English
    In: Nature, 28 January 2016, Vol.529(7587), pp.496-501
    Description: Bacteria express many small RNAs for which the regulatory roles in pathogenesis have remained poorly understood due to a paucity of robust phenotypes in standard virulence assays. Here we use a generic 'dual RNA-seq' approach to profile RNA expression simultaneously in pathogen and host during Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection and reveal the molecular impact of bacterial riboregulators. We identify a PhoP-activated small RNA, PinT, which upon bacterial internalization temporally controls the expression of both invasion-associated effectors and virulence genes required for intracellular survival. This riboregulatory activity causes pervasive changes in coding and noncoding transcripts of the host. Interspecies correlation analysis links PinT to host cell JAK-STAT signalling, and we identify infection-specific alterations in multiple long noncoding RNAs. Our study provides a paradigm for a sensitive RNA-based analysis of intracellular bacterial pathogens and their hosts without physical separation, as well as a new discovery route for hidden functions of pathogen genes.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation -- Genetics ; Host-Pathogen Interactions -- Genetics ; RNA, Bacterial -- Genetics ; RNA, Untranslated -- Genetics ; Salmonella Typhimurium -- Genetics
    ISSN: 00280836
    E-ISSN: 1476-4687
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Cell, 11 April 2013, Vol.153(2), pp.426-437
    Description: Glucose homeostasis is strictly controlled in all domains of life. Bacteria that are unable to balance intracellular sugar levels and deal with potentially toxic phosphosugars cease growth and risk being outcompeted. Here, we identify the conserved haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzyme YigL as the previously hypothesized phosphatase for detoxification of phosphosugars and reveal that its synthesis is activated by an Hfq-dependent small RNA in . We show that the glucose-6-P-responsive small RNA SgrS activates YigL synthesis in a translation-independent fashion by the selective stabilization of a decay intermediate of the dicistronic messenger RNA (mRNA). Intriguingly, the major endoribonuclease RNase E, previously known to function together with small RNAs to degrade mRNA targets, is also essential for this process of mRNA activation. The exploitation of and targeted interference with regular RNA turnover described here may constitute a general route for small RNAs to rapidly activate both coding and noncoding genes. ► The bacterial small RNA SgrS posttranscriptionally activates the synthesis of YigL ► YigL is the previously hypothesized phosphatase that prevents phosphosugar toxicity ► SgrS activates yigL by a translation-independent mRNA-stabilization mechanism ► SgrS stabilizes an intermediate in the yigL mRNA decay pathway YigL, a long-sought bacterial phosphatase, regulates glucose-6-phosphate levels. A small regulatory RNA upregulates YigL synthesis by base pairing with the coding sequence of the preceding gene to interfere with endonucleolytic yigL mRNA decay.
    Keywords: Biology
    ISSN: 0092-8674
    E-ISSN: 1097-4172
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  • 8
    In: EMBO Journal, 17 October 2012, Vol.31(20), pp.4005-4019
    Description: The small RNAs associated with the protein Hfq constitute one of the largest classes of post‐transcriptional regulators known to date. Most previously investigated members of this class are encoded by conserved free‐standing genes. Here, deep sequencing of Hfq‐bound transcripts from multiple stages of growth of revealed a plethora of new small RNA species from within mRNA loci, including DapZ, which overlaps with the 3′ region of the biosynthetic gene, . Synthesis of the DapZ small RNA is independent of DapB protein synthesis, and is controlled by HilD, the master regulator of invasion genes. DapZ carries a short G/U‐rich domain similar to that of the globally acting GcvB small RNA, and uses GcvB‐like seed pairing to repress translation of the major ABC transporters, DppA and OppA. This exemplifies double functional output from an mRNA locus by the production of both a protein and an Hfq‐dependent ‐acting RNA. Our atlas of Hfq targets suggests that the 3′ regions of mRNA genes constitute a rich reservoir that provides the Hfq network with new regulatory small RNAs. Deep sequencing of Hfq‐binding RNAs isolated from at different growth stages reveals that the 3′ UTR of bacterial mRNAs are a rich source of regulatory small RNAs which modulate gene expression in trans.
    Keywords: Abc Transporter ; Dapz ; Gcvb ; Hfq ; 3′ Utr
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 9
    In: EMBO Journal, 13 April 2017, Vol.36(8), pp.1029-1045
    Description: Research into post‐transcriptional control of mRNAs by small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) in the model bacteria and has mainly focused on sRNAs that associate with the RNA chaperone Hfq. However, the recent discovery of the protein ProQ as a common binding partner that stabilizes a distinct large class of structured sRNAs suggests that additional RNA regulons exist in these organisms. The cellular functions and molecular mechanisms of these new ProQ‐dependent sRNAs are largely unknown. Here, we report in Typhimurium the mode‐of‐action of RaiZ, a ProQ‐dependent sRNA that is made from the 3′ end of the mRNA encoding ribosome‐inactivating protein RaiA. We show that RaiZ is a base‐pairing sRNA that represses in the mRNA of histone‐like protein HU‐α. RaiZ forms an RNA duplex with the ribosome‐binding site of mRNA, facilitated by ProQ, to prevent 30S ribosome loading and protein synthesis of HU‐α. Similarities and differences between ProQ‐ and Hfq‐mediated regulation will be discussed. The enterobacterial sRNA RaiZ functions independent of the Hfq RNA chaperone via the recently identified general RNA‐binding protein ProQ. ProQ acts in a dual manner, stabilizing the sRNA and facilitating translational repression of the nucleid protein HU‐α. RaiZ is a small RNA produced by RNase E‐mediated cleavage of the raiA mRNA. RaiZ strongly binds RNA chaperone ProQ, leading to RaiZ stabilization. RaiZ represses translation of the hupA mRNA by base pairing with its ribosome‐binding site. ProQ and RaiZ jointly prevent initiating ribosomes from loading on hupA mRNA. The global RNA‐binding protein ProQ stabilizes bacterial small RNA RaiZ and facilitates translational repression of its target mRNA, thus exemplifying an Hfq‐independent RNA regulon.
    Keywords: Hu‐Α ; Proq ; Raiz ; Small Rna ; Translation Inhibition
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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  • 10
    In: EMBO Journal, 18 May 2011, Vol.30(10), pp.1977-1989
    Description: MicroRNAs have well‐established roles in eukaryotic host responses to viruses and extracellular bacterial pathogens. In contrast, microRNA responses to invasive bacteria have remained unknown. Here, we report cell type‐dependent microRNA regulations upon infection of mammalian cells with the enteroinvasive pathogen, Typhimurium. Murine macrophages strongly upregulate NF‐κB associated microRNAs; strikingly, these regulations which are induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) occur and persist regardless of successful host invasion and/or replication, or whether an inflammatory response is mounted, suggesting that microRNAs belong to the first line of anti‐bacterial defence. However, a suppression of the global immune regulator miR‐155 in endotoxin‐tolerant macrophages revealed that microRNA responses also depend on the status of infected cells. This study identifies the family as the common denominator of ‐regulated microRNAs in macrophages and epithelial cells, and suggests that repression of relieves cytokine IL‐6 and IL‐10 mRNAs from negative post‐transcriptional control. Our results establish a paradigm of microRNA‐mediated feed‐forward activation of inflammatory factors when mammalian cells are targeted by bacterial pathogens. This study describes the global mammalian micoRNA response to infection and the role of miRNAs in regulating the post‐transcriptional control of inflammatory cytokines.
    Keywords: Il‐10 ; Let‐7 ; Mir‐155 ; Mirna ; Salmonella
    ISSN: 0261-4189
    E-ISSN: 1460-2075
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