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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Soil Science Society of America Journal, 2014, Vol.78(6), p.2112
    Description: Over the last 15 years, a considerable body of literature has heralded the agronomic and environmental benefits that could be derived from charring biomass of various origins and applying the resulting "biochar" or "agrichar" to soils. In spite of all...
    Keywords: Research ; Soil Sciences ; Biomass ; Physical Properties ; Mechanical Properties;
    ISSN: Soil Science Society of America Journal
    E-ISSN: 0361-5995
    E-ISSN: 14350661
    Source: CrossRef
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Soil Science Society of America Journal, Jan, 2013, Vol.77(1), p.54(6)
    Description: Until recently, the custom manufacture of equipment for laboratory or field experiments in soil science required appreciable know-how, and was extremely time-consuming. Technological advances in rapid prototyping and o3-D printingo in the last decade afford significant, and as yet untapped, opportunities to manufacture equipment in a very different way. In the present note, we demonstrate with two concrete examples that 3-D printing is not only a very effective and versatile technique to produce laboratory or field equipment. It also alleviates some of the restrictive technical constraints imposed by lathes and molding processes used traditionally, and it permits a much more efficient sharing of information among researchers. Given the tremendous advances in 3-D printing unfolding at the moment, it is anticipated that this technology will revolutionize the way we design, and especially replicate, experiments in soil science.
    Keywords: Rapid Prototyping -- Technology Application ; 3d Printing -- Technology Application ; Technological Innovations -- Usage
    ISSN: 0361-5995
    E-ISSN: 14350661
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in Environmental Science, 01 November 2018, Vol.6
    Description: [...]Shelef et al. review the value of native plants and local production as a means to promote food diversity and agricultural resilience. [...]Chedraoui et al. review in detail the literature devoted to Capparis spinosa (L.), a xerophilous species with a broad range of benefits and potentialities for...
    Keywords: Agroecology ; Best Management Practices ; Biotic and Abiotic Stresses ; Environmental Sustainability ; Native Plants ; Environmental Sciences
    E-ISSN: 2296-665X
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Frontiers in Environmental Science, 01 November 2016, Vol.4
    Description: When confronted with a great piece of art or research, one often wonders about what made it possible, what method was used by its author, in part so one can try to emulate it in one's own activities. Upon the retirement of Garrison Sposito after a long and very distinguished career, we considered that, as former doctoral students of Gary's, we were in a privileged position to write, in our own words and from our perspective, an account of the various key ingredients of his very successful method. In the following, we identify and review six components of this method, respectively his thorough bibliographical coverage, extreme rigor in research, meticulous crafting of manuscripts, parallel focus on several disciplines, firm conviction that it is not necessary to go out of one's way to promote good ideas or competent people, and finally his reluctance to jump on bandwagons. We hope that this analysis of the pillars of Gary's method, at least as we see them, will not only help pay tribute to an outstanding thinker, but also inspire and provide a roadmap to all those who strive to better themselves as researchers.
    Keywords: Publishing ; Epistemology ; Scientific Research ; Mentoring ; Scientific Method ; Environmental Sciences
    E-ISSN: 2296-665X
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  • 5
    In: Soil Science, 2009, Vol.174(8), pp.456-465
    Description: With rising ambient temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, there is an urgent need to monitor soil carbon stocks over large regions of the earth. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance sensing (NIRS) of soils, using satellite- or airplane-based instruments, is increasingly regarded as a potential method of choice for this purpose. Considerable research has been devoted to NIRS in the last few years, but this research has been generally restricted to sieved air-dried soils analyzed under laboratory conditions. For NIRS to be useful for the estimation of soil carbon stocks in the field, a technique must be developed to account, among other things, for the presence of moisture in the surface layer of soils. In this context, a first objective of the research described in this article was to determine whether, for three soils with contrasting characteristics, a simple constant proportionality factor relates NIR spectra obtained at different moisture contents, and whether there is relative constancy of this proportionality factor among soils, suggesting the possibility of a practical strategy to correct NIR spectra for soil moisture. A second objective of the research was to use ratio and derivative analysis to identify portions of NIR spectra that appear least affected by moisture content and on which a determination of other parameters such as organic matter content could be based. Because constant proportionality of the spectra at different moisture contents seems elusive, at best, the most significant result obtained is the identification of specific wavelength ranges in the NIR spectra, at 800 to 1400 nm, 1600 to 1700 nm, 2100 to 2200 nm, and 2300 to 2500 nm, where the first derivative of the spectra seems independent of the moisture content of the soil samples. This observation suggests that an operational method could be developed, focused on these wavelength intervals, to obtain moisture-independent estimates of a range of soil parameters under field conditions.
    Keywords: Temperature ; Carbon Dioxide ; Soil Sciences ; Effects ; Soils ; Moisture Content;
    ISSN: 0038-075X
    E-ISSN: 15389243
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