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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    In: Water Resources Research, May 2006, Vol.42(5), pp.n/a-n/a
    Description: This paper presents a vision that advocates hydropedology as an advantageous integration of pedology and hydrology for studying the intimate relationships between soil, landscape, and hydrology. Landscape water flux is suggested as a unifying precept for hydropedology, through which pedologic and hydrologic expertise can be better integrated. Landscape water flux here encompasses the source, storage, flux, pathway, residence time, availability, and spatiotemporal distribution of water in the root and deep vadose zones within the landscape. After illustrating multiple knowledge gaps that can be addressed by the synergistic integration of pedology and hydrology, we suggest five scientific hypotheses that are critical to advancing hydropedology and enhancing the prediction of landscape water flux. We then present interlinked strategies for achieving the stated vision. It is our hope that by working together, hydrologists and pedologists, along with scientists in related disciplines, can better guide data acquisition, knowledge integration, and model‐based prediction so as to advance the hydrologic sciences in the next decade and beyond.
    Keywords: Catchment Hydrology ; Landscape Processes ; Scale ; Soil Hydrology ; Soil Physics ; Vadose Zone
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
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  • 2
    In: Water Resources Research, August 2019, Vol.55(8), pp.6653-6672
    Description: —a key process for water exchange between soil and atmosphere—is controlled by internal water fluxes and surface vapor fluxes. Recent studies demonstrated that the dynamics of the water flow in corners determine the time behavior of the evaporation rate. The internal water flux of the porous media is often described by capillary flow assuming . Particularly, the crucial influence of , that is, the nonlinear dependency of the capillary flow has been neglected so far. The focus of the paper is to demonstrate that SiO‐surfaces can exhibit contact angles of about 40°. This reduces the internal capillary flow by 1 order of magnitude compared to complete wetting. First, we derived the contact angle by inverse modeling. We conducted a series of evaporation experiments in a 2‐D square lattice microstructure connected by lognormal distributed throats. We used an explicit analytical power series solution of the single square capillary model. A contact angle of 38° ± 1° was derived. Second, we directly measured the contact angle of the Si‐SiO wafer using the Drop Shape Analyzer Krüss 100 and obtained an averaged contact angle of 42° ± 2°. The results support the single square capillary model as an appropriate model for the description of the evaporation process in an ideal square capillary. Evaporation rate dependence on contact angle and temperature: Influence of capillary, viscous, and gravitational forces Visualization micromodel experiments of corner flow: Micromodels produced by a new interval‐based ICP‐DRIE technology Analytical solution for 1‐D corner flow and analysis of the fluid‐fluid patterns and geometric characteristics of the evaporation process
    Keywords: Water Flow ; Silicon Dioxide ; Water Exchange ; Surfaces ; Internal Water ; Power Series ; Water Exchange ; Soil Water ; Evaporation ; Contact Angle ; Dependence ; Evaporation Rate ; Water Flow ; Water Exchange ; Microstructure ; Evaporation ; Porous Media ; Porous Media ; Silica ; Evaporation ; Water Flow ; Capillary Flow ; Atmospheric Models ; Wetting ; Silicon Dioxide ; Fluxes ; Soils ; Evaporation ; Evaporation Rate ; Water Exchange ; Contact Angle;
    ISSN: 0043-1397
    E-ISSN: 1944-7973
    Source: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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