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Berlin Brandenburg

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  • 1
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press | Berlin : Walter de Gruyter GmbH
    Format: 1 Online-Ressource
    ISBN: 9781400881192
    Content: Phylogenies in Ecology is the first book to critically review the application of phylogenetic methods in ecology, and it serves as a primer to working ecologists and students of ecology wishing to understand these methods. This book demonstrates how phylogenetic information is transforming ecology by offering fresh ways to estimate the similarities and differences among species, and by providing deeper, evolutionary-based insights on species distributions, coexistence, and niche partitioning. Marc Cadotte and Jonathan Davies examine this emerging area's explosive growth, allowing for this new body of hypotheses testing. Cadotte and Davies systematically look at all the main areas of current ecophylogenetic methodology, testing, and inference. Each chapter of their book covers a unique topic, emphasizes key assumptions, and introduces the appropriate statistical methods and null models required for testing phylogenetically informed hypotheses. The applications presented throughout are supported and connected by examples relying on real-world data that have been analyzed using the open-source programming language, R.Showing how phylogenetic methods are shedding light on fundamental ecological questions related to species coexistence, conservation, and global change, Phylogenies in Ecology will interest anyone who thinks that evolution might be important in their data.
    Note: Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (publisher's Web site, viewed Sep. 08, 2016)
    Language: English
    URL: Cover
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  • 2
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press
    Format: 1 online resource
    ISBN: 9781400881192
    Content: Phylogenies in Ecology is the first book to critically review the application of phylogenetic methods in ecology, and it serves as a primer to working ecologists and students of ecology wishing to understand these methods. This book demonstrates how phylogenetic information is transforming ecology by offering fresh ways to estimate the similarities and differences among species, and by providing deeper, evolutionary-based insights on species distributions, coexistence, and niche partitioning. Marc Cadotte and Jonathan Davies examine this emerging area's explosive growth, allowing for this new body of hypotheses testing. Cadotte and Davies systematically look at all the main areas of current ecophylogenetic methodology, testing, and inference. Each chapter of their book covers a unique topic, emphasizes key assumptions, and introduces the appropriate statistical methods and null models required for testing phylogenetically informed hypotheses. The applications presented throughout are supported and connected by examples relying on real-world data that have been analyzed using the open-source programming language, R.Showing how phylogenetic methods are shedding light on fundamental ecological questions related to species coexistence, conservation, and global change, Phylogenies in Ecology will interest anyone who thinks that evolution might be important in their data.
    Note: Frontmatter -- -- Contents -- -- Preface -- -- Chapter 1. An Entangled Bank: Evolutionary Relationships and Ecological Patterns -- -- Chapter 2. Building and Using Phylogenies -- -- Chapter 3. Phylogenetic Patterns within Communities -- -- Chapter 4. Randomizations, Null Distributions, and Hypothesis Testing -- -- Chapter 5. Detecting Patterns of Trait Evolution -- -- Chapter 6. The Geography of Speciation and Character Displacement -- -- Chapter 7. Phylogenetic Diversity across Space and Time -- -- Chapter 8. Speciation, Extinction, and the Distribution of Phylogenetic Diversity -- -- Chapter 9. Using Phylogenetic Information to Make Better Conservation Decisions -- -- Chapter 10. Conclusion: Where To From Here? -- -- Glossary -- -- References -- -- Index , Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web. , In English
    Language: English
    URL: Cover
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  • 3
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    Princeton : Princeton University Press
    Format: 1 Online-Ressource (265 p)
    ISBN: 9780691157689 , 9781400881192
    Content: Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- CONTENTS -- Preface -- CHAPTER 1 An Entangled Bank: Evolutionary Relationships and Ecological Patterns -- 1.1. Systematics and the Diversity of Life -- 1.2. The Origins -- 1.3. "Correcting" Ecological Comparisons -- 1.4. The Emergence of Ecophylogenetics -- 1.5. The Goal of This Book -- CHAPTER 2 Building and Using Phylogenies -- 2.1. Handling Phylogenies in R -- 2.2. Building Trees -- 2.3. Finding and Adapting Available Trees -- 2.4. Tree Scaling and Rate Smoothing -- 2.5. Conclusion
    Content: CHAPTER 3 Phylogenetic Patterns within Communities: Inferring Mechanisms of Ecological Assembly Using Phylogenetic Distances -- 3.1. Phylogenetic Distances and Community Assembly -- 3.2. Calculating Community Diversity Metrics -- 3.3. A Note about Phylodiversity Measures-Moving from the Causes to the Consequences of Diversity -- 3.4. Conclusion -- CHAPTER 4 Randomizations, Null Distributions, and Hypothesis Testing
    Content: 4.1. A Brief History of Randomization Tests in Ecology (or the Simberloffian Shift in Ecology) -- 4.2. How to Build Null Communities -- 4.3. Randomizing Phylogenetic Data -- 4.4. Taking the Pool Seriously -- 4.5. Conclusion -- CHAPTER 5 Detecting Patterns of Trait Evolution -- 5.1. Phylogenetic Signal -- 5.2. Alternative Models of Trait Evolution -- 5.3. Reconstructing Ancestral States -- 5.4. Conclusion -- CHAPTER 6 The Geography of Speciation and Character Displacement -- 6.1. Character Divergence and Geographic Overlap
    Content: 6.2. Community-Wide Trait Dispersion -- 6.3. Conclusion -- CHAPTER 7 Phylogenetic Diversity across Space and Time -- 7.1. Phylobetadiversity: Measuring Phylogenetic Turnover -- 7.2. The Influence of Spatial Scale on Phylogenetic Patterns -- 7.3. Conclusion -- CHAPTER 8 Speciation, Extinction, and the Distribution of Phylogenetic Diversity -- 8.1. Conservation of the Tree of Life -- 8.2. Macroevolution: Diversification -- 8.3. Conclusion
    Content: CHAPTER 9 Using Phylogenetic Information to Make Better Conservation Decisions -- 9.1. Why Preserve Evolutionary History? -- 9.2. Quantifying Evolutionary History -- 9.3. Prioritizing Species Based on Evolutionary Distinctiveness -- 9.4. Prioritizing Hotspots of Evolutionary Distinctiveness -- 9.5. Applying Conservation Metrics -- CHAPTER 10 Conclusion: Where To From Here? -- 10.1. Predicting Ecology from Evolutionary Patterns -- 10.2. Combining Trait and Phylogenetic Information -- 10.3. Phylogenetic Insights into a Changing World
    Content: 10.4. Where To Go from Here?
    Note: Description based upon print version of record
    Additional Edition: Print version Cadotte, Marc W Phylogenies in Ecology : A Guide to Concepts and Methods
    Language: English
    Keywords: Electronic books
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  • 4
    Format: Online-Ressource (427 p)
    Edition: Online-Ausg.]
    ISBN: 9780226166049 , 9780226166216
    Content: Over the past several decades, the field of invasion biology has rapidly expanded as global trade and the spread of human populations have increasingly carried animal and plant species across natural barriers that have kept them ecologically separated for millions of years. Because some of these nonnative species thrive in their new homes and harm environments, economies, and human health, the prevention and management of invasive species has become a major policy goal from local to international levels.Yet even though ecological research has led to public conversation and policy recommendatio
    Note: Description based upon print version of record , Contents; Chapter 1. Working across Disciplines to Understand and Manage Invasive Species - R. P. Keller, M. Cadotte, G. Sandiford; Section I. Introduction: Of Toads, Squirrels, Carps, and Kids: How Science and Human Perceptions Drive Our Responses to Invasive Species; Chapter 2. The Ecological, Evolutionary, and Social Impact of Invasive Cane Toads in Australia - R. Shine; Chapter 3. A Tale of Two Squirrels: A British Case Study of the Sociocultural Dimensions of Debates over Invasive Species - P. Coates , Chapter 4. Fish Tales: Optimism and Other Bias in Rhetoric about Exotic Carps in America - G. SandifordChapter 5. "Sooper" Impact: Drawing the Attention of Kids to the Dangers of Invasive Species - M. Newman; Section II. Introduction: Here They Come: Understanding and Managing the Introduction of Invasive Species; Chapter 6. Patterns of Live Vertebrate Importation into the United States: Analysis of an Invasion Pathway - C. Romagosa; Chapter 7. All in the Family: Relatedness and the Success of Introduced Species - M. Cadotte, L. Jin , Chapter 8. Reducing Damaging Introductions from International Species Trade through Invasion Risk Assessment - M. SpringbornSection III. Introduction: Controlling the Bad: Reducing the Impacts of Established Invaders; Chapter 9. Evaluating the Economic Costs and Benefits of Slowing the Spread of Emerald Ash Borer - J. Bossenbroek, A. Croskey, D. Finnoff, L. Iverson, S. McDermott, A. Prasad, C. Sims, D. Sydnor; Chapter 10. Climate Change Challenges in the Management of Invasive Sea Lamprey in Lake Superior - J. Kitchell, T. Cline, V. Bennington, G. McKinley , Chapter 11. Ecological Separation without Hydraulic Separation: Engineering Solutions to Control Invasive Common Carpin Australian Rivers - Robert KellerChapter 12. Does Enemy Release Contribute to the Success of Invasive Species? A Review of the Enemy Release Hypothesis - K. Prior, J. Hellmann; Section IV. Introduction: Where To from Here? Policy Prospects at International, National, and Regional Levels; Chapter 13. From Global to Local: Integrating Policy Frameworks for the Prevention and Management of Invasive Species - S. Burgiel , Chapter 14. Developing Invasive Species Policy for a Major Free Trade Bloc: Challenges and Progress in the European Union - C. ShineChapter 15. There Ought to Be a Law! The Peculiar Absence of Broad Federal Harmful Nonindigenous Species Legislation - M. Miller; Chapter 16. Pathways toward a Policy of Preventing New Great Lakes Invasions - J. Brammeier, T. Cmar; Chapter 17. Final Thoughts: Nature and Human Nature - G. Sandiford, R. P. Keller, M. Cadotte; Index
    Additional Edition: Print version Invasive Species in a Globalized World : Ecological, Social, and Legal Perspectives on Policy
    Language: English
    Keywords: Electronic books
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  • 5
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    Dordrecht : Springer Netherlands | Cham : Springer International Publishing AG
    Format: 1 Online-Ressource (XVIII, 487 Seiten)
    Edition: 1st ed. 2006
    ISBN: 9781402049255 , 1402049250 , 9048106184 , 1402041578 , 1402041586 , 9789048106189
    Series Statement: Invading Nature - Springer Series in Invasion Ecology 1
    Additional Edition: Erscheint auch als Conceptual Ecology and Invasion Biology: Reciprocal Approaches to Nature
    Language: English
    Subjects: Biology
    RVK:
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1314-2488
    Content: Plant traits are critical for understanding invasion success of introduced species, yet attempts to identify universal traits that explain invasion success and impact have been unsuccessful because environmenttrait- fitness relationships are complex, potentially context dependent, and variation in traits is often unaccounted for. As introduced species encounter novel environments, their traits and trait variability can determine their ability to grow and reproduce, yet invasion biologists do not often have an understanding of how novel environments might shape traits. To uncover which combination of traits are most effective for predicting invasion success, we studied three different urban habitat types along the Nile Delta in Egypt invaded by the Pink Morning Glory, Ipomoea carnea Jacq. (Family: Convolvulaceae). Over two years, we measured ten plant traits at monthly intervals along an invasion gradient in each habitat. No single trait sufficiently explained survival probability and that traits linked to invasion success were better predicted by the characteristics of the invaded habitat. While the measured traits did influence survival of I. carnea, the importance of specific traits was contingent on the local environment, meaning that local trait-environment interactions need to be understood in order to predict invasion.
    In: NeoBiota, [s.l.] : Pensoft, 2011-, 2017, 2017, H. 33, S. 1-17, 17, 1314-2488
    Language: English
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  • 7
    Format: Online-Ressource
    In: 21.2014, S. 7-27
    In: NeoBiota, [s.l.] : Pensoft, 2011-
    Language: English
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  • 8
    Format: Online-Ressource , online resource.
    ISSN: 1432-1939 , 1432-1939
    In: day:28
    In: month:6
    In: year:2016
    In: pages:1-10
    In: Oecologia, Berlin ; Heidelberg [u.a.] : Springer, 1968-, 1432-1939
    Language: English
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  • 9
    Format: Online-Ressource
    ISSN: 1314-2488
    Content: The success of invasive species has been explained by two contrasting but non-exclusive views: (i) intrinsic factors make some species inherently good invaders; (ii) species become invasive as a result of extrinsic ecological and genetic influences such as release from natural enemies, hybridization or other novel ecological and evolutionary interactions. These viewpoints are rarely distinguished but hinge on distinct mechanisms leading to different management scenarios. ...
    In: NeoBiota, [s.l.] : Pensoft, 2011-, 21, 2014, S. 7-27, 1314-2488
    Language: English
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1469-185X
    In: Biological reviews, Oxford : Wiley-Blackwell, 1923-, 92, 2016, H. 2, S. 698-715, 18, 1469-185X
    Language: English
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