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  • 11
    Language: English
    In: Innovative surgical sciences, September 2016, Vol.1(1), pp.3-11
    Description: Over the last decades, neoadjuvant treatment has been established as a standard of care for a variety of tumor types in visceral oncology. Neoadjuvant treatment is recommended in locally advanced esophageal and gastric cancer as well as in rectal cancer. In borderline resectable pancreatic cancer, neoadjuvant therapy is an emerging treatment concept, whereas in resectable colorectal liver metastases, neoadjuvant treatment is often used, although the evidence for improvement of survival outcomes is rather weak. What makes neoadjuvant treatment attractive from a surgical oncology viewpoint is its ability to shrink tumors to a smaller size and to increase the chances for complete resection with clear surgical margins, which is a prerequisite for cure. Studies suggest that local tumor control is increased in some visceral tumor types, especially with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. In some other studies, a better control of systemic disease has contributed to significantly improved survival rates. Additionally, delaying surgery offers the chance to bring the patient into a better general condition for major surgery, but it also confers the risk of progression. Although it is a relatively rare event, cancers may progress locally during neoadjuvant treatment or distant metastases may occur, jeopardizing a curative surgical treatment approach. Although this is seen as risk of neoadjuvant treatment, it can also be seen as a chance to select only those patients for surgery who have a better control of systemic disease. Some studies showed increased perioperative morbidity in patients who underwent neoadjuvant treatment, which is another potential disadvantage. Optimal multidisciplinary teamwork is key to controlling that risk. Meanwhile, the neoadjuvant treatment period is also used as a "window of opportunity" for studying the activity of novel drugs and for investigating predictive and prognostic biomarkers of chemoradiotherapy and radiochemotherapy. Although the benefits of neoadjuvant treatment have been clearly established, the risk of overtreatment of cancers with an unfavorable prognosis remains an issue. All indications for neoadjuvant treatment are based on clinical staging. Even if staging is done meticulously, making use of all recommended diagnostic modalities, the risk of overstaging and understaging remains considerable and may lead to false indications for neoadjuvant treatment. Finally, despite all developments and emerging concepts in medical oncology, many cancers remain resistant to the currently available drugs and radiation. This may in part be due to specific molecular resistance mechanisms that are marginally understood thus far. Neoadjuvant treatment has been one of the major advances in multidisciplinary oncology in the last decades, requiring a dedicated treatment team and an optimal infrastructure for complex oncology care. This article discusses the goals and novel directions as well as limitations in neoadjuvant treatment of visceral cancers.
    Keywords: Chemoradiotherapy ; Chemotherapy ; Morbidity ; Mortality ; Neoadjuvant ; Respectability
    E-ISSN: 2364-7485
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  • 12
    Language: English
    In: Deutsches Arzteblatt international, 06 August 2018, Vol.115(31-32), pp.513-519
    Description: Early gastro-esophageal cancer is staged as m1 to m3 depending on the infiltration of the anatomical layers of the mucosa or, analogously, as sm1 to sm3 depending on the depth of infiltration into the submucosa. The risk of lymph node metastases is low in mucosal carcinoma but increases with the depth of infiltration into the submucosa. This review is based on pertinent publications retrieved by a selective search in MEDLINE, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN) registry. New technologies such as narrow-band imaging have improved the endo- scopic diagnosis and staging of early gastro-esophageal cancer. The development of endoscopic submucosal dissection has led to a higher R0 resection rate, a lower risk of recurrence, and an increase in the number of endoscopic resections that are performed with curative intent. In squamous-cell carcinoma of the esophagus, surgical oncological esophagectomy is indicated if the cancer infiltrates into the third mucosal layer (T1a, m3) or deeper. In esophageal adenocarcinoma, the prevalence of lymph node metastases is low if the cancer is restricted to the mucosa and in- creases only when the submucosa is infiltrated. In the current German S3 guideline, endoscopic resection is recommended for intramucosal adenocarcinoma as long as there are no further histopathological risk factors. Lymph node metastasis in gastric carcinoma begins in the deep mucosal infiltration stage (m3). If certain special con- ditions ("extended criteria") are met, carcinoma expanding into the first submucosal layer (sm1) can be removed endoscopically. All further stages must be treated with total or subtotal gastrectomy with systematic D2 lymphadenectomy. Borderline cases between endoscopic and surgical resection of early carcinoma of the esophagus or stomach must be managed with an interdisciplinary treatment algorithm. If there is a risk of lymph node metastasis, surgical oncological resection is indicated. Such resections of gastroesophageal cancer in the locally advanced stage should always be part of a multimodal treatment approach.
    Keywords: Digestive System Surgical Procedures -- Methods ; Endoscopy -- Methods ; Esophageal Neoplasms -- Surgery ; Stomach Neoplasms -- Surgery
    E-ISSN: 1866-0452
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  • 13
    Language: German
    In: MMW Fortschritte der Medizin, July 2016, Vol.158(13), pp.43-6
    Keywords: Gastric Cancer Surgery ; Enhanced Recovery ; Fast Track Surgery ; Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (Hipec) ; Minimally Invasive/Robotic Gastrectomy ; Risk and Complication Management ; Stomach Neoplasms -- Surgery
    ISSN: 1438-3276
    E-ISSN: 16133560
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  • 14
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Feb, 2010, Vol.14(1), p.46(12)
    Description: Byline: Ines Gockel (1), Stephan Timm (1), George G. Sgourakis (1), Thomas J. Musholt (1), Andreas D. Rink (1), Hauke Lang (1) Keywords: Myotomy; Achalasia; LES; Laparoscopic myotomy; Heller myotomy Abstract: Introduction Heller myotomy leads to good--excellent long-term results in 90% of patients with achalasia and thereby has evolved to the "first-line" therapy. Failure of surgical treatment, however, remains an urgent problem which has been discussed controversially recently. Materials and Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed to analyze the long-term results of failures after Heller's operation with emphasis on treatment by remedial myotomy. Discussion Other reinterventions and their causes after failure of surgical treatment in patients with achalasia are discussed. Author Affiliation: (1) Department of General and Abdominal Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131, Mainz, Germany Article History: Registration Date: 25/08/2009 Received Date: 29/04/2009 Accepted Date: 25/08/2009 Online Date: 24/10/2009
    Keywords: Surgery -- Analysis
    ISSN: 1091-255X
    E-ISSN: 18734626
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 15
    Language: English
    In: Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy, 01 April 2011, Vol.11(4), pp.601-612
    Description: Lymph node status is the most important single prognostic factor in esophageal cancer. The detection of involved lymph nodes is therefore the key to cure. This article will provide a meta-analysis and metaregression analysis on the diagnostic performances of current lymph node-detection devices;...
    Keywords: Esophageal Cancer ; Imaging Devices ; Lymph Node Metastasis ; Meta-Analysis ; Micrometastasis ; Molecular Markers ; Sentinel Lymph Node Navigation ; Systematic Review ; Medicine
    ISSN: 1473-7140
    E-ISSN: 1744-8328
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  • 16
    Language: English
    In: BMC Cancer, Feb 15, 2012, Vol.12, p.70
    Description: Background Our aim was to compare survival of the various treatment modality groups of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in relation to SEMS (self-expanding metal stents) in a retrospective case-control study. We have made the hypothesis that the administration of combined chemoradiotherapy improves survival in inoperable esophageal cancer patients. Methods All patients were confirmed histologically as having surgically non- resectable esophageal carcinoma. Included were patients with squamous cell carcinoma, undifferentiated carcinoma as well as Siewert type I--but not type II - esophagogastric junctional adenocarcinoma. The decision to proceed with palliative treatments was taken within the context of a multidisciplinary team meeting and full expert review based on patient's wish, co-morbid disease, clinical metastases, distant metastases, M1 nodal metastases, T4-tumor airway, aorta, main stem bronchi, cardiac invasion, and peritoneal disease. Patients not fit enough to tolerate a radical course of definitive chemo- and/or radiation therapy were referred for self-expanding metal stent insertion. Our approach to deal with potential confounders was to match subjects according to their clinical characteristics (contraindications for surgery) and tumor stage according to diagnostic work-up in four groups: SEMS group (A), Chemotherapy group (B), Radiotherapy group (C), and Chemoradiotherapy group (D). Results Esophagectomy was contraindicated in 155 (35.5%) out of 437 patients presenting with esophageal cancer to the Department of General and Abdominal Surgery of the University Hospital of Mainz, Germany, between November 1997 and November 2007. There were 133 males and 22 females with a median age of 64.3 (43-88) years. Out of 155 patients, 123 were assigned to four groups: SEMS group (A) n = 26, Chemotherapy group (B) n = 12, Radiotherapy group (C) n = 23 and Chemoradiotherapy group (D) n = 62. Mean patient survival for the 4 groups was as follows: Group A: 6.92 [+ -] 8.4 months; Group B: 7.75 [+ -] 6.6 months; Group C: 8.56 [+ -] 9.5 months, and Group D: 13.53 [+ -] 14.7 months. Significant differences in overall survival were associated with tumor histology (P = 0.027), tumor localization (P = 0.019), and type of therapy (P = 0.005), respectively, in univariate analysis. Treatment modality (P = 0.043) was the only independent predictor of survival in multivariate analysis. The difference in overall survival between Group A and Group D was highly significant (P [less than] 0.01) and in favor of Group D. As concerns Group D versus Group B and Group D versus Group C there was a trend towards a difference in overall survival in favor of Group D (P = 0.069 and P = 0.059, respectively). Conclusions The prognosis of inoperable esophageal cancer seems to be highly dependent on the suitability of the induction of patient-specific therapeutic measures and is significantly better, when chemoradiotherapy is applied.
    Keywords: Chemotherapy -- Health Aspects ; Chemotherapy -- Patient Outcomes ; Chemotherapy -- Comparative Analysis ; Esophageal Cancer -- Care And Treatment ; Esophageal Cancer -- Patient Outcomes ; Esophageal Cancer -- Research ; Radiotherapy -- Health Aspects ; Radiotherapy -- Patient Outcomes ; Radiotherapy -- Comparative Analysis
    ISSN: 1471-2407
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 17
    Language: English
    In: BMC Cancer, Feb 15, 2012, Vol.12, p.70
    Description: Background Our aim was to compare survival of the various treatment modality groups of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in relation to SEMS (self-expanding metal stents) in a retrospective case-control study. We have made the hypothesis that the administration of combined chemoradiotherapy improves survival in inoperable esophageal cancer patients. Methods All patients were confirmed histologically as having surgically non- resectable esophageal carcinoma. Included were patients with squamous cell carcinoma, undifferentiated carcinoma as well as Siewert type I--but not type II - esophagogastric junctional adenocarcinoma. The decision to proceed with palliative treatments was taken within the context of a multidisciplinary team meeting and full expert review based on patient's wish, co-morbid disease, clinical metastases, distant metastases, M1 nodal metastases, T4-tumor airway, aorta, main stem bronchi, cardiac invasion, and peritoneal disease. Patients not fit enough to tolerate a radical course of definitive chemo- and/or radiation therapy were referred for self-expanding metal stent insertion. Our approach to deal with potential confounders was to match subjects according to their clinical characteristics (contraindications for surgery) and tumor stage according to diagnostic work-up in four groups: SEMS group (A), Chemotherapy group (B), Radiotherapy group (C), and Chemoradiotherapy group (D). Results Esophagectomy was contraindicated in 155 (35.5%) out of 437 patients presenting with esophageal cancer to the Department of General and Abdominal Surgery of the University Hospital of Mainz, Germany, between November 1997 and November 2007. There were 133 males and 22 females with a median age of 64.3 (43-88) years. Out of 155 patients, 123 were assigned to four groups: SEMS group (A) n = 26, Chemotherapy group (B) n = 12, Radiotherapy group (C) n = 23 and Chemoradiotherapy group (D) n = 62. Mean patient survival for the 4 groups was as follows: Group A: 6.92 [+ -] 8.4 months; Group B: 7.75 [+ -] 6.6 months; Group C: 8.56 [+ -] 9.5 months, and Group D: 13.53 [+ -] 14.7 months. Significant differences in overall survival were associated with tumor histology (P = 0.027), tumor localization (P = 0.019), and type of therapy (P = 0.005), respectively, in univariate analysis. Treatment modality (P = 0.043) was the only independent predictor of survival in multivariate analysis. The difference in overall survival between Group A and Group D was highly significant (P [less than] 0.01) and in favor of Group D. As concerns Group D versus Group B and Group D versus Group C there was a trend towards a difference in overall survival in favor of Group D (P = 0.069 and P = 0.059, respectively). Conclusions The prognosis of inoperable esophageal cancer seems to be highly dependent on the suitability of the induction of patient-specific therapeutic measures and is significantly better, when chemoradiotherapy is applied.
    Keywords: Chemotherapy -- Health Aspects ; Chemotherapy -- Patient Outcomes ; Chemotherapy -- Comparative Analysis ; Esophageal Cancer -- Care And Treatment ; Esophageal Cancer -- Patient Outcomes ; Esophageal Cancer -- Research ; Radiotherapy -- Health Aspects ; Radiotherapy -- Patient Outcomes ; Radiotherapy -- Comparative Analysis
    ISSN: 1471-2407
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 18
    Language: English
    In: Gastroenterology, May 2014, Vol.146(5), pp.S-299-S-299
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0016-5085
    E-ISSN: 1528-0012
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
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  • 19
    Language: English
    In: Gastroenterology, May 2012, Vol.142(5), pp.S-1094-S-1094
    Keywords: Medicine
    ISSN: 0016-5085
    E-ISSN: 1528-0012
    Source: ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
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  • 20
    Language: English
    In: Visceral Medicine, April 2018, Vol.34(2), pp.90-91
    Keywords: Editorial
    ISBN: 9783318063226
    ISBN: 3318063223
    ISSN: 2297-4725
    E-ISSN: 2297-475X
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