Kooperativer Bibliotheksverbund

Berlin Brandenburg

and
and

Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Type of Medium
Language
Year
  • 11
    Language: English
    In: Water, Air, & Soil Pollution, 2010, Vol.209(1), pp.489-500
    Description: The applicability of laboratory tests for the prediction of soil solution composition and concentrations of inorganic contaminants is still under debate. Therefore, we carried out two batch-leaching tests differing in their liquid/solid ratios and column experiments (saturated flow, two flow velocities, four flow interruptions ranging from 4 h to 21 days) with a contaminated humic horizon (total contents: As, 196 mg kg −1 ; Cd, 4 mg kg −1 ; Cr, 202 mg kg −1 ; Cu, 227 mg kg −1 ; Ni, 64 mg kg −1 ; Pb, 308 mg kg −1 ; Zn, 1,176 mg kg −1 ) from a Mollic Fluvisol near the rivers Elbe and Saale (Germany) and compared the aqueous contaminant concentrations with those of soil solutions obtained in situ with ceramic suction cups on a monthly basis between 2002 and 2006. Contaminant release in the field slightly depended on the water regime, pH, and redox potential and was characterized by partially high concentrations (e.g., As, 47 µg l −1 ; Cd, 136 µg l −1 ; Ni, 328 µg l −1 ; Zn, 8.68 mg l −1 ), which exceeded the German inspection values. Metal concentrations obtained in batch-leaching tests partially fitted to those determined in the soil solution and to those from the column experiments even irrespective of the varying liquid/solid ratios. The column experiments yielded realistic concentrations of Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb and their ranges. Furthermore, they provided an insight into release kinetics and release processes as well as into potential contaminant release due to enforced reducing conditions. As column experiments allow a larger temporal sampling resolution and enable quickly to manipulate experimental conditions, they are a useful complement of soil solution monitoring.
    Keywords: Wetland soil ; Soil solution ; Metals ; Batch-leaching test ; Column experiments ; Soil contamination
    ISSN: 0049-6979
    E-ISSN: 1573-2932
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 12
    Language: English
    In: Environmental pollution, 2013, Vol.179, pp.315-325
    Description: Mass transfer processes of pollutants from non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) may control groundwater pollution at abandoned industrial sites. We studied release kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from fresh and aged tar phases using a dialysis tubing technique. Time for equilibration ranged from several days to more than three years. For fresh tar materials the release seems to be limited by retarded pore diffusion, while for two of three aged tars diffusion limited release influenced by dissolved organic matter (DOM) was assumed. The equilibration process was driven by solubilization thermodynamics expressed by Raoult's law. Yet, solubility enhancement was observed potentially due to the presence of organic mobile sorbents. The results show that the release of PAHs from tar phases is generally rate limited and partitioning according to Raoult's law is the driving mechanism of the exchanges process. ; p. 315-325.
    Keywords: Nonaqueous Phase Liquids ; Dissolved Organic Matter ; Dialysis ; Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons ; Solubilization ; Solubility ; Mass Transfer ; Thermodynamics ; Groundwater Contamination
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 13
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, August 2013, Vol.179, pp.315-325
    Description: Mass transfer processes of pollutants from non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) may control groundwater pollution at abandoned industrial sites. We studied release kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from fresh and aged tar phases using a dialysis tubing technique. Time for equilibration ranged from several days to more than three years. For fresh tar materials the release seems to be limited by retarded pore diffusion, while for two of three aged tars diffusion limited release influenced by dissolved organic matter (DOM) was assumed. The equilibration process was driven by solubilization thermodynamics expressed by Raoult's law. Yet, solubility enhancement was observed potentially due to the presence of organic mobile sorbents. The results show that the release of PAHs from tar phases is generally rate limited and partitioning according to Raoult's law is the driving mechanism of the exchanges process. Release of PAHs from tar phases is severely restricted by retarded pore diffusion.
    Keywords: Aging ; Coal Tar ; Manufactured Gas Plant Sites ; Tar Processing Facilities ; Reactive Transport ; Dissolved Organic Matter ; Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons ; Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    E-ISSN: 1873-6424
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 14
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Pollution, 2011, Vol.159(5), pp.1398-1405
    Description: Arsenic mobility may increase in liquid phase due to association with colloidal Fe oxides. We studied the association of As with Fe oxide colloids in the effluent from water-saturated soil columns run under anoxic conditions. Upon exfiltration, the solutions, which contained Fe , were re-aerated and ferrihydrite colloids precipitated. The entire amount of effluent As was associated with the ferrihydrite colloids, although PO , SiO , CO and dissolved organic matter were present in the effluent during ferrihydrite colloid formation. Furthermore, no subsequent release of As from the ferrihydrite colloids was observed despite the presence of these (in)organic species known to compete with As for adsorption on Fe oxides. Arsenic was bound via inner-sphere complexation on the ferrihydrite surface. FTIR spectroscopy also revealed adsorption of PO and polymerized silica. However, these species could not impede the quantitative association of As with colloidal ferrihydrite in the soil effluents. ► Ferrihydrite (Fh) colloids precipitated from a solution derived from soil. ► Arsenic that was discharged from soil entirely associated with these colloids. ► Arsenic was strongly bound to the Fh surface via inner-sphere complexation. ► A complexation of As by organic species discharged from soil was not detected. ► (In)organic solutes in the solution from soil could not impede the As–Fh association. Natural concentrations of competing (in)organic species in soil-derived solutions do not impede the strong and quantitative association between As and colloidal ferrihydrite.
    Keywords: Iron Hydroxide ; Phosphate ; Silicate ; Carbonate ; Dissolved Organic Matter ; Engineering ; Environmental Sciences ; Anatomy & Physiology
    ISSN: 0269-7491
    E-ISSN: 1873-6424
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 15
    Language: English
    In: Journal of Soils and Sediments, Jan, 2012, Vol.12(1), p.3(21)
    Description: Byline: Thilo Rennert (1), Kai U. Totsche (1), Katja Heister (2), Michael Kersten (3), Jurgen Thieme (4) Keywords: AFM; Interfaces; uCT; NanoSIMS; Soils; X-ray microscopy Abstract: Purpose Biogeochemical interfaces, the 3D association of minerals, soil organic matter, and biota, are hotspots of soil processes because they exhibit strong biological, physical, and chemical gradients. Biogeochemical interfaces have thicknesses from nanometers to micrometers and separate bulk immobile phases from mobile liquid or gaseous phases. The aim of this contribution is to review advanced microscopic and spectroscopic characterization techniques that allow for spatially resolved analysis of composition and properties of biogeochemical interfaces or their visualization. Materials and methods From the variety of techniques to study biogeochemical interfaces in soil, we focus on X-ray spectromicroscopy, nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy, micro-X-ray tomography, and positron emission tomography. Beside an introduction into the respective method, we review published applications and give practical examples. Results and discussion The development of terrestrial soils involves the formation of biogeochemical interfaces as the result of the complex 3D interplay of primary and secondary minerals, soil organic matter together with soil biota. X-ray microscopy allows for the visualization of structures down to range of 10--30 nm and for the determination of binding states of elements. Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry is capable of simultaneously analyzing up to seven secondary ion species to give the elemental and isotopic composition down to 50--150 nm. Atomic force microscopy enables to study the topography and mechanical properties (softness, elasticity, plasticity, deformability) of soil particle surfaces down to the nm scale. X-ray micro-tomography has been shown to visualize the interior of materials at the sub-micrometer scale successfully. Conclusions Introducing and adapting the discussed methods in soil science has increased the understanding of formation, properties, and functioning of biogeochemical interfaces in soil. A further challenging task is to utilize further promising techniques, e.g., advanced Raman techniques or atomic probe tomography with the highest spatial resolution for 3D compositional information of any microscopy technique. Author Affiliation: (1) LS Hydrogeologie, Institut fur Geowissenschaften, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitat Jena, Burgweg 11, 07749, Jena, Germany (2) Lehrstuhl fur Bodenkunde, Technische Universitat Munchen, 85350, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany (3) Institut fur Geowissenschaften, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitat Mainz, Becherweg 21, 55099, Mainz, Germany (4) NSLS-II Project, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973, USA Article History: Registration Date: 09/08/2011 Received Date: 01/07/2011 Accepted Date: 09/08/2011 Online Date: 30/08/2011
    Keywords: Mass Spectrometry -- Methods ; Soil Carbon -- Methods ; Nanotechnology -- Methods ; Atomic Force Microscopy -- Methods
    ISSN: 1439-0108
    E-ISSN: 16147480
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 16
    Language: English
    In: Chemical Geology, Jan 10, 2014, Vol.363, p.13(9)
    Description: To link to full-text access for this article, visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemgeo.2013.10.029 Byline: Thilo Rennert, Karin Eusterhues, Syuntaro Hiradate, Hergen Breitzke, Gerd Buntkowsky, Kai U. Totsche, Tim Mansfeldt Abstract: At 12,900aBP, the eruption of the Laacher See volcano generated a new parent material for Holocene soil formation in parts of Western Germany. Weathering of these ashes commonly includes the formation of poorly crystalline minerals such as allophane, imogolite and ferrihydrite. Detection of these minerals in soil is difficult, yet an important task, because they may govern soil functions and processes, e.g., stabilisation of organic matter and nutrient availability. Therefore, we characterised three forested Andosols by a combination of wet-chemical and spectroscopic techniques including infrared and (.sup.27Al,.sup.29Si) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with X-ray diffractometry. Deconvoluting the.sup.29Si-NMR spectra revealed that 1.6 to 10.4% of total Si was present as allophanic compounds, which coincided with the amounts of oxalate-extractable Si. Since extraction methods are not completely selective, we observed a slight overestimation of allophanic Si estimated from oxalate extraction. Although the sites under study are located close to each other in similar relief positions and with similar vegetation, the combination of our results revealed varying amounts of loess in the parent materials and varying weathering intensity. High weathering intensities correlate with the amounts of allophane. Article History: Received 12 July 2013; Revised 21 October 2013; Accepted 27 October 2013 Article Note: (miscellaneous) Editor: Carla M. Koretsky
    Keywords: Oxalic Acid -- Methods ; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy -- Methods ; Oxalates -- Methods
    ISSN: 0009-2541
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 17
    Language: English
    In: Chemosphere, May 2016, Vol.150, pp.390-397
    Description: Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) combined with a seven steps sequential extraction technique were used to assess the geochemical distribution of chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) in a contaminated floodplain soil. Total contents of Cr and Pb were 490.3 and 402.1 mg kg , respectively. The residual fraction was 59.5 and 56.3% of total Cr and Pb. The crystalline iron (Fe) oxide was the dominant non-residual fraction of Cr (35.9% of total Cr). Considerable amounts of Pb were found in the organic fraction (35.4%). Using C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the soil organic matter was identified as 48.9% aromatic carbon, which indicated that a certain portion of Pb and Cr might be associated with aromatic compounds. The SEM–EDX images demonstrate a concomitant occurrence of Pb, manganese (Mn), Fe, and aluminum (Al) as well as a coexistence of Cr and Fe. The release dynamics of dissolved Cr and Pb as affected by redox potential (E ), pH, Fe, Mn, dissolved organic carbon, and sulfate was quantified using an automated biogeochemical microcosm apparatus. Soil pH decreased under oxic conditions. The release of Cr, Pb, Fe, and Mn increased under acidic oxic (pH = 3.7, E  = 521 mV) conditions due to the associated decrease of pH (7.1–3.7). The mobilization of Cr and Pb was affected by the Fe and Mn. In conclusion, our multi-technique approach identified the geochemical distribution of Cr and Pb and verified major factors that explain mobilization of Cr and Pb in floodplain soils.
    Keywords: Toxic Metals ; Mobilization ; Wetlands ; Scanning Electron Microscope Coupled With Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (SEM–Edx) ; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR) ; Chemistry ; Ecology
    ISSN: 0045-6535
    E-ISSN: 1879-1298
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 18
    Language: English
    In: Environmental Geochemistry and Health, 2017, Vol.39(2), pp.331-344
    Description: Central European floodplain soils are often contaminated with potentially toxic metals. The prediction of their aqueous concentrations is a prerequisite for an assessment of environmental concerns. We tested the aqueous concentrations of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) derived from multi-surface adsorption modelling (on hydrous iron, aluminum and manganese oxides, clay and soil organic matter) against those analyzed in situ in the soil solution of four horizons of floodplain soils at the Elbe River, Germany. The input data for the reactive metals were derived from a seven-step sequential extraction scheme or from extraction with 0.43 M nitric acid (HNO 3 ) and evaluated in four modelling scenarios. In all scenarios, measured and modelled concentrations were positively related, except partially for Pb. Close reproduction of the measured data was obtained using measured data of accompanying cations and anions together with amounts of reactive metals from both the sequential extraction or from 0.43 M HNO 3 extraction, except for Cu, which was often strongly overestimated, and partially Cd. We recommend extraction with 0.43 M HNO 3 to quantify reactive metals in soil because the modelling results were metal-specific with better or equal results using the single extractant, the application of which is also less laborious. Approximations of ion concentrations and water contents yielded similar results. Modelled solid-phase speciation of metals varied with pH and differed from that from sequential extraction. Multi-surface modelling may be an effective tool to predict both aqueous concentrations and solid-phase speciation of metals in soil.
    Keywords: Multi-surface modelling ; Metals ; Soil contamination ; Sequential extraction ; Fluvisol
    ISSN: 0269-4042
    E-ISSN: 1573-2983
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 19
    Language: English
    In: Catena, February 2017, Vol.149, pp.381-384
    Description: To access, purchase, authenticate, or subscribe to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.catena.2016.10.020 Byline: Thilo Rennert [t.rennert@uni-hohenheim.de] (a,*), Nchia Peter Ghong (a), JAaAaAeA rg Rinklebe ( Keywords Fluvisols; Soil organic carbon; Decomposition; Stabilization; DRIFT spectroscopy; Permanganate-oxidizable carbon Highlights * First comprehensive quantitative study on labile SOM in floodplain soils * Large amounts of less processed SOM in subsoil horizons of floodplain soils * Significant correlation of POXC and other C fractions in well-aerated horizons * Consistency of permanganate-oxidizable C and DRIFT spectroscopy in oxidized horizons Abstract Riverine floodplain soils contain large stocks of soil organic matter (SOM) also in larger depth. Qualitative characterization of SOM, especially in the subsoil horizons of floodplain soils, is scarce. To gain deeper insights into the composition of SOM and the driving parameters of SOM processing, we studied 121 horizons of 18 soil profiles along the Central Elbe River (Germany) by determining permanganate-oxidizable carbon (POXC) and a stability parameter derived from diffuse reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectroscopy. The absolute and relative amounts of POXC varied between the horizons. While the topsoil horizons contained the largest total contents of POXC (average 923 mg kg.sup.- 1 soil), the largest relative proportions were detected in subsoil horizons characterized by reducing conditions and water saturation (up to 19% of total organic C), which exceeded those reported for terrestrial soils. The absolute contents of POXC were positively and partially highly significantly correlated with those of total organic, hot-water extractable and microbial-biomass C, confirming its nature as slightly processed and relatively labile fraction of SOM. The correlations were distinctly weaker for the reduced horizons, indicating hampered decomposition. The contents of POXC were also positively correlated with the DRIFT stability parameter, expressing the ratio of aliphatic to aromatic C. Our results suggest the presence of a large fraction of less processed SOM in the subsoils of floodplain soils, originating from inputs of particulate organic matter that was buried and weakly decomposed at water saturation, and partially from charcoal particles, also transported by the river water. The results point to a possible limitation of POXC as an indicator of decomposition to soils lacking an aquic moisture regime. Author Affiliation: (a) Fachgebiet Bodenchemie mit Pedologie, Institut fAaAaAeA r Bodenkunde u Standortslehre, UniversitAaAaAeAnt Hohenheim, 70593 Stuttgart, Germa (b) Boden- und Grundwassermanagement, Bergische UniversitAaAaAeAnt Wupperta Pauluskirchstr. 7, 42285 Wuppertal, Germany * Corresponding author. Article History: Received 15 July 2016; Revised 18 October 2016; Accepted 25 October 2016
    Keywords: Fluvisols ; Soil Organic Carbon ; Decomposition ; Stabilization ; Drift Spectroscopy ; Permanganate-Oxidizable Carbon ; Sciences (General) ; Geography ; Geology
    ISSN: 0341-8162
    E-ISSN: 1872-6887
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 20
    Language: English
    In: Geochimica et cosmochimica acta, 2012, Vol.77, pp.444-456
    Description: Recent studies on the microbial reduction of synthetic iron oxide colloids showed their superior electron accepting property in comparison to bulk iron oxides. However, natural colloidal iron oxides differ in composition from their synthetic counterparts. Besides a potential effect of colloid size, microbial iron reduction may be accelerated by electron-shuttling dissolved organic matter (DOM) as well as slowed down by inhibitors such as arsenic. We examined the microbial reduction of OM- and arsenic-containing ferrihydrite colloids. Four effluent fractions were collected from a soil column experiment run under water-saturated conditions. Ferrihydrite colloids precipitated from the soil effluent and exhibited stable hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 281 (±146)nm in the effluent fraction that was collected first and 100 (±43)nm in a subsequently obtained effluent fraction. Aliquots of these oxic effluent fractions were added to anoxic low salt medium containing diluted suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens. Independent of the initial colloid size, the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids were quickly and completely reduced. The rates of Fe²⁺ formation ranged between 1.9 and 3.3fmolh⁻¹cell⁻¹, and are in the range of or slightly exceeding previously reported rates of synthetic ferrihydrite colloids (1.3fmolh⁻¹cell⁻¹), but greatly exceeding previously known rates of macroaggregate-ferrihydrite reduction (0.07fmolh⁻¹cell⁻¹). The inhibition of microbial Fe(III) reduction by arsenic is unlikely or overridden by the concurrent enhancement induced by soil effluent DOM. These organic species may have increased the already high intrinsic reducibility of colloidal ferrihydrite owing to quinone-mediated electron shuttling. Additionally, OM, which is structurally associated with the soil effluent ferrihydrite colloids, may also contribute to the higher reactivity due to increasing solubility and specific surface area of ferrihydrite. In conclusion, ferrihydrite colloids from soil effluents can be considered as highly reactive electron acceptors in anoxic environments. ; p. 444-456.
    Keywords: Colloids ; Iron Oxides ; Dissolved Organic Matter ; Effluents ; Arsenic ; Hydrodynamics ; Solubility ; Ferrihydrite ; Geobacter Sulfurreducens ; Iron ; Surface Area ; Soil
    ISSN: 0016-7037
    Source: AGRIS (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)
    Library Location Call Number Volume/Issue/Year Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. Further information can be found on the KOBV privacy pages