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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Journal of bacteriology, December 2014, Vol.196(23), pp.4012-25
    Description: Haemophilus ducreyi causes the sexually transmitted disease chancroid and a chronic limb ulceration syndrome in children. In humans, H. ducreyi is found in an abscess and overcomes a hostile environment to establish infection. To sense and respond to membrane stress, bacteria utilize two-component systems (TCSs) and extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors. We previously showed that activation of CpxRA, the only intact TCS in H. ducreyi, does not regulate homologues of envelope protein folding factors but does downregulate genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, including many virulence determinants. H. ducreyi also harbors a homologue of RpoE, which is the only ECF sigma factor in the organism. To potentially understand how H. ducreyi responds to membrane stress, here we defined RpoE-dependent genes using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 180 RpoE-dependent genes, of which 98% were upregulated; a major set of these genes encodes homologues of envelope maintenance and repair factors. We also identified and validated a putative RpoE promoter consensus sequence, which was enriched in the majority of RpoE-dependent targets. Comparison of RpoE-dependent genes to those controlled by CpxR showed that each transcription factor regulated a distinct set of genes. Given that RpoE activated a large number of genes encoding envelope maintenance and repair factors and that CpxRA represses genes encoding envelope-localized proteins, these data suggest that RpoE and CpxRA appear to play distinct yet complementary roles in regulating envelope homeostasis in H. ducreyi.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial ; Stress, Physiological ; Bacterial Proteins -- Metabolism ; Cell Membrane -- Physiology ; Haemophilus Ducreyi -- Physiology ; Protein Kinases -- Metabolism ; Sigma Factor -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00219193
    E-ISSN: 1098-5530
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: Journal of bacteriology, August 2013, Vol.195(15), pp.3486-502
    Description: Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, a genital ulcer disease that facilitates the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. In humans, H. ducreyi is surrounded by phagocytes and must adapt to a hostile environment to survive. To sense and respond to environmental cues, bacteria frequently use two-component signal transduction (2CST) systems. The only obvious 2CST system in H. ducreyi is CpxRA; CpxR is a response regulator, and CpxA is a sensor kinase. Previous studies by Hansen and coworkers showed that CpxR directly represses the expression of dsrA, the lspB-lspA2 operon, and the flp operon, which are required for virulence in humans. They further showed that CpxA functions predominantly as a phosphatase in vitro to maintain the expression of virulence determinants. Since a cpxA mutant is avirulent while a cpxR mutant is fully virulent in humans, CpxA also likely functions predominantly as a phosphatase in vivo. To better understand the role of H. ducreyi CpxRA in controlling virulence determinants, here we defined genes potentially regulated by CpxRA by using RNA-Seq. Activation of CpxR by deletion of cpxA repressed nearly 70% of its targets, including seven established virulence determinants. Inactivation of CpxR by deletion of cpxR differentially regulated few genes and increased the expression of one virulence determinant. We identified a CpxR binding motif that was enriched in downregulated but not upregulated targets. These data reinforce the hypothesis that CpxA phosphatase activity plays a critical role in controlling H. ducreyi virulence in vivo. Characterization of the downregulated genes may offer new insights into pathogenesis.
    Keywords: Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial ; Bacterial Proteins -- Metabolism ; Haemophilus Ducreyi -- Genetics ; Phosphoprotein Phosphatases -- Metabolism ; Protein Kinases -- Metabolism ; Repressor Proteins -- Metabolism ; Virulence Factors -- Biosynthesis
    ISSN: 00219193
    E-ISSN: 1098-5530
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2015, Vol.10(4), p.e0124373
    Description: Haemophilus ducreyi resists the cytotoxic effects of human antimicrobial peptides (APs), including α-defensins, β-defensins, and the cathelicidin LL-37. Resistance to LL-37, mediated by the sensitive to antimicrobial peptide (Sap) transporter, is required for H. ducreyi virulence in humans. Cationic APs are attracted to the negatively charged bacterial cell surface. In other gram-negative bacteria, modification of lipopolysaccharide or lipooligosaccharide (LOS) by the addition of positively charged moieties, such as phosphoethanolamine (PEA), confers AP resistance by means of electrostatic repulsion. H. ducreyi LOS has PEA modifications at two sites, and we identified three genes (lptA, ptdA, and ptdB) in H. ducreyi with homology to a family of bacterial PEA transferases. We generated non-polar, unmarked mutants with deletions in one, two, or all three putative PEA transferase genes. The triple mutant was significantly more susceptible to both α- and β-defensins; complementation of all three genes restored parental levels of AP resistance. Deletion of all three PEA transferase genes also resulted in a significant increase in the negativity of the mutant cell surface. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that LptA was required for PEA modification of lipid A; PtdA and PtdB did not affect PEA modification of LOS. In human inoculation experiments, the triple mutant was as virulent as its parent strain. While this is the first identified mechanism of resistance to α-defensins in H. ducreyi, our in vivo data suggest that resistance to cathelicidin LL-37 may be more important than defensin resistance to H. ducreyi pathogenesis.
    Keywords: Sciences (General)
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: Int. J. of Computational Biology and Drug Design, 2014, Vol 7 Issue 2/3, pp 195 - 213
    Description: High throughput bacterial RNA-Seq experiments can generate extremely high and imbalanced sequencing coverage. Over- or under-estimation of gene expression levels will hinder accurate gene differential expression analysis. Here we evaluated strategies to identify expression differences of genes with high coverage in bacterial transcriptome data using either raw sequence reads or unique reads with duplicate fragments removed. In addition, we proposed a generalised linear model (GLM) based approach to identify imbalance in read coverage based on sequence compositions. Our results show that analysis using raw reads identifies more differentially expressed genes with more accurate fold change than using unique reads. We also demonstrate the presence of sequence composition related biases that are independent of gene expression levels and experimental conditions. Finally, genes that still show strong coverage imbalance after correction were tagged using statistical approach.
    Keywords: bacterial transcriptome sequencing; RNA-Seq; gene differential expression; coverage imbalance; tri-nucleotides; GLM; generalised linear modelling; computational biology; RNA sequences; gene expression levels.
    ISSN: 1756-0756
    ISSN: 17560756
    ISSN: 1756-0764
    ISSN: 17560764
    E-ISSN: 1756-0764
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  • 5
    In: Journal of Bacteriology, Feb, 1996, Vol.178(3-4), p.808(9)
    Description: A study was conducted to determine the role of the pili expressed by Haemophilus ducreyi in the pathogenesis of the genital ulcer disease chancroid. A gene encoding the 24K protein of fine, tangled pili, termed ftpA, was isolated and examined by molecular techniques. The results showed that the FtpA protein lacked homology with other pilins, but shared homoloy with proteins that polymerize ordered rings in Escherichia coli and Treponema pallidum.
    Keywords: Hemophilus Infections -- Genetic Aspects
    ISSN: 0021-9193
    E-ISSN: 10985530
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  • 6
    In: Infection and Immunity, 2001, Vol. 69(7), p.4224
    Description: Haemophilus ducreyi is the etiologic agent of chancroid, a sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease that facilitates the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. In the human model of infection, the histopathology of infected sites in part resembles a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. In this study, T cells were isolated from skin biopsy specimens obtained from 24 subjects who were infected for 7 to 14 days. One clone and 12 lines that responded to H. ducreyi antigens were obtained from 12 of the subjects. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis showed that the antigen-responsive lines and clone were predominantly CD3 super(+) and CD4 super(+). The lines and clone responded to H. ducreyi antigen in a dose-dependent manner and produced gamma interferon (IFN- gamma ) alone or IFN- gamma and interleukin-10 (IL- 10) but no IL-4 or IL-5 in response to H. ducreyi. Proliferation of T cells was dependent on the presence of autologous antigen- presenting cells. The lines showed little response to antigens prepared from other members of the Pasteurellaceae and responded to different fractions of H. ducreyi separated by preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We conclude that T cells that recognize H. ducreyi antigens are recruited to sites experimentally infected with the organism. The lack of cross-reactivity to the Pasteurellaceae and the response of the lines to different antigen fractions suggest that subjects are sensitized to H. ducreyi during the course of infection.
    Keywords: Haemophilus Ducreyi ; Pasteurellaceae ; Lymphocytes T ; Hypersensitivity (Delayed) ; Cytokines ; Interleukin 10 ; Interleukin 4 ; Interleukin 5 ; Lymphocytes T ; Hypersensitivity (Delayed) ; Cytokines ; Interleukin 10 ; Interleukin 4 ; Interleukin 5 ; ^G-Interferon ; Haemophilus Ducreyi ; Pasteurellaceae ; Bacteria ; Immune Response and Immune Mechanisms ; Function ; Man ; Man ; Haemophilus Ducreyi ; Pasteurellaceae ; Gamma -Interferon ; Man;
    ISSN: 0019-9567
    ISSN: 00199567
    E-ISSN: 10985522
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  • 7
    In: Infection and Immunity, 2001, Vol. 69(4), p.2549
    Description: In a previous study, Haemophilus ducreyi was found in the pustule and dermis of samples obtained at the clinical end point in the human model of infection. To understand the kinetics of localization, we examined infected sites at 0, 24, and 48 h after inoculation and at the clinical end point. Immediately after inoculation, bacteria were found predominantly in the dermis but also in the epidermis. Few bacteria were detectable at 24 h; however, by 48 h, bacteria were readily seen in the pustule and dermis. H. ducreyi was associated with polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages in the pustule and at its base, but was not associated with T cells, Langerhans' cells, or fibroblasts. H. ducreyi colocalized with collagen and fibrin but not laminin or fibronectin. Association with phagocytes, collagen, and fibrin was seen as early as 48 h and persisted at the pustular stage of disease. Optical sectioning by confocal microscopy and transmission electron microscopy both failed to demonstrate intracellular H. ducreyi. These data identify collagen and fibrin as potentially important targets of adherence in vivo and strongly suggest that H. ducreyi remains extracellular throughout infection and survives by resisting phagocytic killing in vivo.
    Keywords: Bacterial Adhesion ; Collagen -- Physiology ; Fibrin -- Physiology ; Haemophilus Ducreyi -- Physiology ; Phagocytes -- Microbiology;
    ISSN: 0019-9567
    ISSN: 00199567
    E-ISSN: 10985522
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of infectious diseases, 01 June 2008, Vol.197(11), pp.1531-6
    Description: Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP contains a cluster of homologues of genes required for the synthesis of enterobacterial common antigen (ECA), suggesting that H. ducreyi may express a putative ECA-like glycoconjugate. WecA initiates the synthesis of ECA by transferring N-acetylglucosamine to undecaprenyl-P, to form lipid I. A wecA mutant (35000HPwecA) was constructed, and 5 volunteers were inoculated at 3 sites with fixed doses of 35000HP on one arm and at 3 sites with varying doses of 35000HPwecA on the other arm. 35000HPwecA caused pustules to form at 3 sites inoculated with a dose 2.5-fold higher than that of 35000HP. However, at sites inoculated with similar doses of 35000HP and 35000HPwecA, pustules developed at 46.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.3%-70.0%) of 15 parent-strain sites and at 8.3% (95% CI, 0.01%-23.6%) of 12 mutant-strain sites (P = .013). Thus, the expression of wecA contributes to the ability of H. ducreyi to cause pustules in humans.
    Keywords: Multigene Family ; Antigens, Bacterial -- Genetics ; Chancroid -- Microbiology ; Haemophilus Ducreyi -- Genetics
    ISSN: 0022-1899
    E-ISSN: 15376613
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  • 9
    In: Infection and Immunity, 2005, Vol. 73(7), p.3896
    Description: T-cell homing to infected skin is not well studied in humans. We examined sites experimentally infected with Haemophilus ducreyi by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry for expression of receptors and ligands involved in cutaneous T-cell homing and determined the phenotypes of the T cells that trafficked to skin. Endothelial cells expressed E-selectin in infected but not uninfected skin, while peripheral node addressin (PNAd) was minimally expressed in all samples. CC chemokine ligand 27 (CCL27) was expressed in the epidermis and endothelium of both infected and uninfected skin. Interestingly, CCL21, a chemokine thought to be associated principally with T-cell trafficking in the lymphatic compartment, was highly expressed on the endothelium of infected skin. Few naive cells were present in experimental lesions, emphasizing the combined role of PNAd and CCL21 in trafficking of this subset. Memory cells (CD45RA super(-)) dominated both CD4 and CD8 T-cell populations at the site of infection. Effector memory (CD45RA super(-) CD27 super(-)) CD4 super(+) and CD8 super(+) T cells were enriched in lesions. Although the CC chemokine receptor 7-positive (CCR7 super(+)) population of both central memory (CD45RA super(-) CD27 super(+)) and effector memory cells was not enriched in the skin compared to peripheral blood, CCR7 super(+) cells were not precluded from entering infected skin. Taken together with our previous work (D. Soler, T. L. Humphreys, S. M. Spinola, and J. J. Campbell, Blood 101:1677-1683, 2003), these studies led us to propose a model of memory T-cell trafficking to skin in response to experimental H. ducreyi infection.
    Keywords: Techniques and Reagents ; Bacteria;
    ISSN: 0019-9567
    ISSN: 00199567
    E-ISSN: 10985522
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 1 February 1990, Vol.161(2), pp.336-339
    Description: The development of vaccines to prevent Neisseria infections has been impeded by antigenic diversity of most Neisseria surface components. The lipid-modified azurin (Laz), one of two distinct surface proteins recognized by the H.8 monoclonal antibody, is present in all pathogenic Neisseria. The mature protein has two domains; one contains an H.8 epitope and the other has extensive homology to azurins, a class of bacterial copper-binding proteins. The cellular location of Laz and the serum immune response to Laz were examined in patients with disseminated Neisseria infections. The data demonstrated that Laz is probably contained in the Neisseria outer membrane, although unlike most outer membrane proteins it is Sarkosyl soluble. By probing recombinant bacteriophages encoding the H.8 and azurin domains of Laz, results showed that whereas the H.8 epitope is immunogenic in patients with disseminated Neisseria infections, the azurin domain of Laz plays little role in eliciting an antibody response in these patients.
    Keywords: Biological sciences -- Biology -- Microbiology -- Epitopes ; Physical sciences -- Chemistry -- Chemical compounds -- Polyclonal antibodies ; Health sciences -- Medical conditions -- Infections -- Monoclonal antibodies ; Health sciences -- Medical sciences -- Immunology -- Monoclonal antibodies ; Health sciences -- Medical sciences -- Immunology -- Monoclonal antibodies ; Health sciences -- Medical sciences -- Immunology -- Monoclonal antibodies ; Physical sciences -- Astronomy -- Astronomical cosmology -- Monoclonal antibodies ; Physical sciences -- Chemistry -- Chemical compounds -- Monoclonal antibodies ; Health sciences -- Medical sciences -- Immunology -- Monoclonal antibodies ; Health sciences -- Medical sciences -- Immunology -- Monoclonal antibodies
    ISSN: 00221899
    E-ISSN: 15376613
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