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  • 1
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 11 October 2016, Vol.113(41), pp.E5993-E5995
    Description: Author contributions: M.A.A., H.R., and J.K. designed research; J.K. performed research; M.A.A. and J.K. analyzed data; and M.A.A., H.R., and J.K. wrote the paper.
    Keywords: Plant Leaves ; Temperature
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 2
    Language: English
    In: PLoS ONE, 01 January 2015, Vol.10(8), p.e0136579
    Description: The present study with young poplar trees aimed at characterizing the effect of O2 shortage in the soil on net uptake of NO3- and NH4+ and the spatial distribution of the N taken up. Moreover, we assessed biomass increment as well as N status of the trees affected by O2 deficiency. For this...
    Keywords: Sciences (General)
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 3
    Language: English
    In: New Phytologist, Feb, 2011, Vol.189, p.659(19)
    Description: To authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2010.03576.x Byline: Jorg Kruse (1), Heinz Rennenberg (1), Mark A. Adams (2) Keywords: acclimatization; Arrhenius kinetics; Q-model; respiration; temperature response Abstract: Contents Summary Temperature crucially affects the speed of metabolic processes in poikilotherm organisms, including plants. The instantaneous temperature responses of O.sub.2-reduction and CO.sub.2-release can be approximated by Arrhenius kinetics, even though respiratory gas exchange of plants is the net effect of many constituent biochemical processes. Nonetheless, the classical Arrhenius equation must be modified to account for a dynamic response to measurement temperatures. We show that this dynamic response is readily explained by combining Arrhenius and Michaelis-Menten kinetics, as part of a fresh appraisal of metabolic interpretations of instantaneous temperature responses. In combination with recent experimental findings, we argue that control of mitochondrial electron flow is shared among cytochrome oxidase and alternative oxidase under in vivo conditions, and is continuously coordinated. In this way, upstream carbohydrate metabolism and downstream electron transport appear to be optimized according to the demand of ATP, TCA-cycle intermediates and anabolic reducing power under differing metabolic states. We provide a link to the 'Growth and Maintenance Paradigm' of respiration and argue that respiratory temperature responses can be used as a tool to probe metabolic states of plant tissue, such that we can learn more about the mechanisms that govern longer-term acclimatization responses of plant metabolism. Author Affiliation: (1)Institute of Forest Botany, Chair of Tree Physiology, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 53-54, D-79110 Freiburg, Germany (2)Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia Article History: Received: 6 July 2010, Accepted: 29 October 2010 Article note: Author for correspondence:, Jorg Kruse, Tel: +49 (0) 761 203 8300, Fax: +49 (0) 761 203 8302, Email: joerg.kruse@ctp.uni-freiburg.de
    Keywords: Carbohydrate Metabolism -- Physiological Aspects ; Cytochrome Oxidase -- Physiological Aspects
    ISSN: 0028-646X
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 4
    Language: English
    In: New Phytologist, Feb, 2011, Vol.189, p.659(19)
    Description: To authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.2010.03576.x Byline: Jorg Kruse (1), Heinz Rennenberg (1), Mark A. Adams (2) Keywords: acclimatization; Arrhenius kinetics; Q-model; respiration; temperature response Abstract: Contents Summary Temperature crucially affects the speed of metabolic processes in poikilotherm organisms, including plants. The instantaneous temperature responses of O.sub.2-reduction and CO.sub.2-release can be approximated by Arrhenius kinetics, even though respiratory gas exchange of plants is the net effect of many constituent biochemical processes. Nonetheless, the classical Arrhenius equation must be modified to account for a dynamic response to measurement temperatures. We show that this dynamic response is readily explained by combining Arrhenius and Michaelis-Menten kinetics, as part of a fresh appraisal of metabolic interpretations of instantaneous temperature responses. In combination with recent experimental findings, we argue that control of mitochondrial electron flow is shared among cytochrome oxidase and alternative oxidase under in vivo conditions, and is continuously coordinated. In this way, upstream carbohydrate metabolism and downstream electron transport appear to be optimized according to the demand of ATP, TCA-cycle intermediates and anabolic reducing power under differing metabolic states. We provide a link to the 'Growth and Maintenance Paradigm' of respiration and argue that respiratory temperature responses can be used as a tool to probe metabolic states of plant tissue, such that we can learn more about the mechanisms that govern longer-term acclimatization responses of plant metabolism. Author Affiliation: (1)Institute of Forest Botany, Chair of Tree Physiology, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 53-54, D-79110 Freiburg, Germany (2)Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia Article History: Received: 6 July 2010, Accepted: 29 October 2010 Article note: Author for correspondence:, Jorg Kruse, Tel: +49 (0) 761 203 8300, Fax: +49 (0) 761 203 8302, Email: joerg.kruse@ctp.uni-freiburg.de
    Keywords: Carbohydrate Metabolism -- Physiological Aspects ; Cytochrome Oxidase -- Physiological Aspects
    ISSN: 0028-646X
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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  • 5
    In: Journal Of Experimental Botany, 2014, Vol. 65(20), pp.5711-5724
    Description: Metabolite flux analyses support our understanding of physiological processes. An integrating approach is required combining metabolite fluxes at different levels of complexity from cells via tissues and organs to the whole plant. Understanding the dynamics of physiological process in the systems biology era requires approaches at the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome levels. In this context, metabolite flux experiments have been used in mapping metabolite pathways and analysing metabolic control. In the present review, sulphur metabolism was taken to illustrate current challenges of metabolic flux analyses. At the cellular level, restrictions in metabolite flux analyses originate from incomplete knowledge of the compartmentation network of metabolic pathways. Transport of metabolites through membranes is usually not considered in flux experiments but may be involved in controlling the whole pathway. Hence, steady-state and snapshot readings need to be expanded to time-course studies in combination with compartment-specific metabolite analyses. Because of species-specific differences, differences between tissues, and stress-related responses, the quantitative significance of different sulphur sinks has to be elucidated; this requires the development of methods for whole-sulphur metabolome approaches. Different cell types can contribute to metabolite fluxes to different extents at the tissue and organ level. Cell type-specific analyses are needed to characterize these contributions. Based on such approaches, metabolite flux analyses can be expanded to the whole-plant level by considering long-distance transport and, thus, the interaction of roots and the shoot in metabolite fluxes. However, whole-plant studies need detailed empirical and mathematical modelling that have to be validated by experimental analyses.
    Keywords: Compartmentation ; Membrane Transport ; Metabolite Flux Analyses ; Modelling ; Sulphur Flux ; Sulphur Reduction And Assimilation.
    ISSN: 0022-0957
    E-ISSN: 1460-2431
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  • 6
    In: PLoS ONE, 2015, Vol.10(5)
    Description: Climate change poses direct or indirect influences on physiological mechanisms in plants. In particular, long living plants like trees have to cope with the predicted climate changes (i.e. drought and air warming) during their life span. The present study aimed to quantify the consequences of simulated climate change for foliar N metabolites over a drought-rewetting-drought course. Saplings of three Central European oak species (i.e. Quercus robur , Q . petraea , Q . pubescens ) were tested on two different soil types (i.e. acidic and calcareous). Consecutive drought periods increased foliar amino acid-N and soluble protein-N concentrations at the expense of structural N in all three oak species. In addition, transient effects on foliar metabolite dynamics were observed over the drought-rewetting-drought course. The lowest levels of foliar soluble protein-N, amino acid-N and potassium cation with a minor response to drought and air warming were found in the oak species originating from the driest/warmest habitat ( Q . pubescens ) compared to Q . robur and Q . petraea . Higher foliar osmolyte-N and potassium under drought and air warming were observed in all oak species when grown on calcareous versus acidic soil. These results indicate that species-specific differences in physiological mechanisms to compensate drought and elevated temperature are modified by soil acidity.
    Keywords: Research Article
    E-ISSN: 1932-6203
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  • 7
    Language: English
    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 09 June 2015, Vol.112(23), pp.7309-14
    Description: The Darwin plant Dionaea muscipula is able to grow on mineral-poor soil, because it gains essential nutrients from captured animal prey. Given that no nutrients remain in the trap when it opens after the consumption of an animal meal, we here asked the question of how Dionaea sequesters prey-derived potassium. We show that prey capture triggers expression of a K(+) uptake system in the Venus flytrap. In search of K(+) transporters endowed with adequate properties for this role, we screened a Dionaea expressed sequence tag (EST) database and identified DmKT1 and DmHAK5 as candidates. On insect and touch hormone stimulation, the number of transcripts of these transporters increased in flytraps. After cRNA injection of K(+)-transporter genes into Xenopus oocytes, however, both putative K(+) transporters remained silent. Assuming that calcium sensor kinases are regulating Arabidopsis K(+) transporter 1 (AKT1), we coexpressed the putative K(+) transporters with a large set of kinases and identified the CBL9-CIPK23 pair as the major activating complex for both transporters in Dionaea K(+) uptake. DmKT1 was found to be a K(+)-selective channel of voltage-dependent high capacity and low affinity, whereas DmHAK5 was identified as the first, to our knowledge, proton-driven, high-affinity potassium transporter with weak selectivity. When the Venus flytrap is processing its prey, the gland cell membrane potential is maintained around -120 mV, and the apoplast is acidified to pH 3. These conditions in the green stomach formed by the closed flytrap allow DmKT1 and DmHAK5 to acquire prey-derived K(+), reducing its concentration from millimolar levels down to trace levels.
    Keywords: Akt ; Cipk ; Dionaea Muscipula ; Hak5 ; Transporter ; Calcium -- Metabolism ; Droseraceae -- Metabolism ; Potassium -- Metabolism ; Protein Kinases -- Metabolism
    ISSN: 00278424
    E-ISSN: 1091-6490
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  • 8
    Language: English
    In: Forest Ecology and Management, 2011, Vol.262(2), pp.105-114
    Description: ► Competition for N between young and adult beech is reduced by seasonal timing. ► Beech seedlings favour N uptake in spring, adult beech trees in autumn. ► Removal of vegetation components does not play a role in this competition. ► Competition between plants and soil microorganisms is, therefore, not avoided. Plant growth, reproduction, and biomass allocation may be affected differently by nitrogen availability depending on tree size and age. In this context, competition for limited N may be avoided by different strategies of N acquisition between different vegetation components (i.e., seedlings, mature trees, other woody and herbaceous understorey). This study investigated in a field experiment whether the competition for N between different vegetation components in beech forests was prevented via seasonal timing of N uptake and affected by microbial N use. For this purpose, a removal approach was used to study the seasonal effects on N uptake and N metabolites in adult beech trees and beech natural regeneration, as well as soil microbial processes of inorganic N production and utilisation. We found that the competition for N between beech natural regeneration and mature beech trees was reduced by seasonal avoidance strategies (“good parenting”) of N uptake regardless of the N sources used. In spring, organic and inorganic N uptake capacity was significantly higher in beech seedlings compared to adult beech trees, whereas in autumn mature beech trees showed the highest N uptake rates. Removal of vegetation components did not result in changes in soil microbial N processes in the course of the growing season. Thus, N resources released by the removal of vegetation components were marginal. This consistency in soil microbial N processes indicates that competition between plants and soil microorganisms for N was not avoided by timing of acquisition during the vegetation period, but existed during the entire growing season. In conclusion, N nutrition in the studied forest ecosystem seems to be optimally attuned to European beech.
    Keywords: Fagus Sylvatica ; N Uptake ; N Metabolites ; Soil Microorganisms ; Soil N Processes ; Removal Approach ; Forestry ; Biology
    ISSN: 0378-1127
    E-ISSN: 1872-7042
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  • 9
    Language: English
    In: Plant and Soil, 2013, Vol.364(1), pp.287-301
    Description: Background and aims: Nitrous oxide (N sub(2)O) and methane (CH sub(4)) can be emitted from surfaces of riparian plants. Data on the emission of these greenhouse gases by upland trees are scarce. We quantified CH sub(4) and N sub(2)O emissions from stems of Fagus sylvatica, an upland tree, and Alnus glutinosa, a riparian tree. Methods: The gas fluxes were investigated in mesocosms under non-flooded control conditions and during a flooding period using static chamber systems and gas chromatographic analyses. Results: Despite differences in the presence of an aerenchyma system, both tree species emitted N sub(2)O and CH sub(4) from the stems. Flooding caused a dramatic transient increase of N sub(2)O stem emissions by factors of 740 (A. glutinosa) and even 14,230 (F. sylvatica). Stem emissions of CH sub(4) were low and even deposition was determined (F. sylvatica controls). The results suggest that CH sub(4) was transported mainly through the aerenchyma, whereas N sub(2)O transport occurred in the xylem sap. Conclusions: For the first time it has been demonstrated that upland trees such as F. sylvatica clearly significantly emit N sub(2)O from their stems despite lacking an aerenchyma. If this result is confirmed in adult trees, upland forests may constitute a new and significant source of atmospheric N sub(2)O.
    Keywords: Methane ; Nitrous oxide ; Soil and stem emission ; Alnus glutinosa ; Fagus sylvatica ; Flooding
    ISSN: 0032-079X
    E-ISSN: 1573-5036
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  • 10
    Language: English
    In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Sept 1, 2015, Vol.81(17), pp.5957-5967
    Description: Study is conducted to test the hypothesis that ectomycorrhizal communities and the free-living rhizosphere microbes from beech trees from sites with two distinct climatic conditions shows differences in N acquisition. To test these hypotheses, young trees from dryer conditions and also from cooler, moist climate conditions are transplanted and it concluded that the ectomycorrhizal community influences N transfer to its host and fungal community from dry condition are efficient in N acquisition.
    Keywords: Mycorrhizae – Research ; Mycorrhizae – Physiological Aspects ; Beeches – Research ; Beeches – Physiological Aspects
    ISSN: 0099-2240
    Source: Cengage Learning, Inc.
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