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  • 1
    Format: 1 Online-Ressource (50 Seiten) , Textdatei , 1,23 MB
    Edition: Revised and updated english version of the german original
    Series Statement: Working paper 2019, 3
    Content: This Working Paper argues that conflicts in <em class="albert-highlight">refugee</em> shelters in Germany can largely be attributed to structural causes. These include the asylum regime, the interplay between the physical layout and social relationships within <em class="albert-highlight">refugee</em> shelters, and the specific properties of the <em class="albert-highlight">refugee</em> accommodation system, which can be regarded as a “total institution”. Further, there are other causes of conflict, which can be located at the personal level. On the basis of a qualitative survey, we worked with more than 200 participants in 33 <em class="albert-highlight">refugee</em> shelters operated at state and municipal level across the federal state (Land) of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW). Based on the data collected, we analyse five types of conflict: Conflicts at the individual level, group conflicts, aggressive behaviour and criminality, domestic and sexual violence and conflicts between residents and staff as well as conflict between institutions. The hypothesis that reported cases of conflict represent more than a mere collection of isolated cases was confirmed. Instead, conflict can usually be ascribed to certain interrelated root causes. Participants themselves were often unaware of the processes at work here. We therefore recommend a comprehensive approach to conflict prevention that takes both structural and personal causes of conflict into account. In this manner, the shelter situation could be improved significantly for refugees and staff. (AUT)
    Language: English
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  • 2
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    Oxford : New Internationalist
    Format: Online-Ressource (273 p)
    ISBN: 9781904456483 , 9781780260075
    Content: Intro -- Book Title -- Acknowledgments -- Reviews -- Contents -- Who's Who -- Introduction -- 1. <em class="albert-highlight">Waiting</em> for War -- 2. War: 'Shock and Awe' -- 3. 'We have nothing' : The rebuilding of Iraq -- 4. To Kurdistan -- 5. Saddam's arrest -- 6. Health in a shattered state -- 7. Incommunicado: Prisoners in Abu Gharaib -- 8. Start of the Circus -- 9. Asking the fairies: The circus in the squatter camps -- 10. Another <em class="albert-highlight">day</em> -- 11. Playing with the lost boys -- 12. Happy family -- 13. The most famous circus in Iraq -- 14. 'Collateral damage' -- 15. The bomb -- 16. Circus to Kurdistan -- 17. Circus in the South -- 18. Falluja -- 19. Falluja's refugees -- 20. Thawra -- 21. Where have <em class="albert-highlight">all</em> the women gone? -- 22. Universities -- 23. De-ba'athification -- Chapter 24 -- Further Reading and Resources -- About the New Internationalist.
    Note: Description based upon print version of record , ""Book Title""; ""Acknowledgments""; ""Reviews""; ""Contents""; ""Who's Who""; ""Introduction""; ""1. Waiting for War""; ""2. War: 'Shock and Awe'""; ""3. 'We have nothing' : The rebuilding of Iraq""; ""4. To Kurdistan""; ""5. Saddam's arrest""; ""6. Health in a shattered state""; ""7. Incommunicado: Prisoners in Abu Gharaib""; ""8. Start of the Circus""; ""9. Asking the fairies: The circus in the squatter camps""; ""10. Another day""; ""11. Playing with the lost boys""; ""12. Happy family""; ""13. The most famous circus in Iraq""; ""14. 'Collateral damage'""; ""15. The bomb"" , ""16. Circus to Kurdistan""""17. Circus in the South""; ""18. Falluja""; ""19. Falluja's refugees""; ""20. Thawra""; ""21. Where have all the women gone?""; ""22. Universities""; ""23. De-ba'athification""; ""Chapter 24""; ""Further Reading and Resources""; ""About the New Internationalist""
    Additional Edition: Print version Don't Shoot the Clowns : Taking a Circus to the Children of Iraq
    Language: English
    Keywords: Electronic books
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  • 3
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    Sacramento : Litwin Books
    Format: Online-Ressource (249 p)
    ISBN: 9781936117901 , 9781634000123
    Content: Intro -- Table of Contents -- Foreword -- Preface -- Editor's Acknowledgements -- Editor's Note -- Finding the Way Home February 1989 -- No Chocolates for Breakfast April 1989 -- <em class="albert-highlight">Waiting</em> for a Taxi June 1989 -- The Dance of Revolution August 1989 -- Where Is the Rage? October 1989 -- Unrecorded Agonies December 1989 -- Wrong or White February 1990 -- Mandela and the Kingdom Come April 1990 -- Diversity or Death June 1990 -- In the Presence of Giants August 1990 -- A Chance at Grace October 1990 -- Intifada, U.S.A. December 1990 -- Requiem for Sara February 1991 -- The Big-Time Coward April 1991 -- A New Politics of Sexuality July 1991 -- Thomas Was Not the Point November 1991 -- Can I Get a Witness? December 1991 -- The Fire This Time January 1992 -- Toward a Manifest New Destiny February 1992 -- Valentine's <em class="albert-highlight">Day</em>, 1992 March 1992 -- Requiem for the Champ April 1992 -- The Light of the Fire June 1992 -- Willing and Able August 1992 -- This Time I'll Vote November 1992 -- On the Night of November 3, 1992 January 1993 -- Islam and the U.S.A. Today February 1993 -- I Am Seeking an Attitude May 1993 -- The Truth of Rodney King June 1993 -- Bosnia Betrayed September 1993 -- Freedom Time November 1993 -- A Good Fight December 1993 -- Give Me Two Reasons March 1994 -- A Powerful Hatred May 1994 -- We Are <em class="albert-highlight">All</em> Refugees July 1994 -- Innocent of What? September 1994 -- Where I Live Now January 1995 -- Where I Live Now, Part Two March 1995 -- In the Land of White Supremacy June 1995 -- Manifesto of the Rubber Gloves August 1995 -- My Mess, and Ours October 1995 -- The Street Where I live December 1995 -- Stories of a Visitor February 1996 -- Justice at Risk April 1996 -- Where Is the Sisterhood? June 1996 -- Eyewitness in Lebanon August 1996 -- Not a Good Girl October 1996 -- For Clinton, With Disgust November 1996 -- A Gathering Purpose January 1998.
    Note: Description based upon print version of record , ""Table of Contents""; ""Foreword""; ""Preface""; ""Editor�s Acknowledgements""; ""Editor�s Note""; ""Finding the Way Home February 1989""; ""No Chocolates for Breakfast April 1989""; ""Waiting for a Taxi June 1989""; ""The Dance of Revolution August 1989""; ""Where Is the Rage? October 1989""; ""Unrecorded Agonies December 1989""; ""Wrong or White February 1990""; ""Mandela and the Kingdom Come April 1990""; ""Diversity or Death June 1990""; ""In the Presence of Giants August 1990""; ""A Chance at Grace October 1990""; ""Intifada, U.S.A. December 1990"" , ""Requiem for Sara February 1991""""The Big-Time Coward April 1991""; ""A New Politics of Sexuality July 1991""; ""Thomas Was Not the Point November 1991""; ""Can I Get a Witness? December 1991""; ""The Fire This Time January 1992""; ""Toward a Manifest New Destiny February 1992""; ""Valentine�s Day, 1992 March 1992""; ""Requiem for the Champ April 1992""; ""The Light of the Fire June 1992""; ""Willing and Able August 1992""; ""This Time I�ll Vote November 1992""; ""On the Night of November 3, 1992 January 1993""; ""Islam and the U.S.A. Today February 1993"" , ""I Am Seeking an Attitude May 1993""""The Truth of Rodney King June 1993""; ""Bosnia Betrayed September 1993""; ""Freedom Time November 1993""; ""A Good Fight December 1993""; ""Give Me Two Reasons March 1994""; ""A Powerful Hatred May 1994""; ""We Are All Refugees July 1994""; ""Innocent of What? September 1994""; ""Where I Live Now January 1995""; ""Where I Live Now, Part Two March 1995""; ""In the Land of White Supremacy June 1995""; ""Manifesto of the Rubber Gloves August 1995""; ""My Mess, and Ours October 1995""; ""The Street Where I live December 1995"" , ""Stories of a Visitor February 1996""""Justice at Risk April 1996""; ""Where Is the Sisterhood? June 1996""; ""Eyewitness in Lebanon August 1996""; ""Not a Good Girl October 1996""; ""For Clinton, With Disgust November 1996""; ""A Gathering Purpose January 1998""; ""The Stoning of Bill Clinton November 1998""; ""O, California! January 1999""; ""Breast Cancer: Still Here February 1999""; ""From the Kosovo Series: First Three Poems June 1999""; ""From the Kosovo Series: Next Three Poems July 1999""; ""Good News of Our Own August 1999""; ""The Hunters and the Hunted October 1999"" , ""A Letter to Maria October 2000""""New Year Poem February 2001""; ""The Invisible People: An Unsolicited Report on Black Rage March 2001""; ""Scenario Revision #1 September 2001""; ""Do You Do Well to Be Angry November 2001""; ""Bibliography""; ""Endnotes""; ""Index""
    Additional Edition: Print version Life as Activism : June Jordan's Writings from The Progressive
    Language: English
    Keywords: Electronic books
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  • 4
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    Haymarket Books
    ISBN: 9781642591194
    Content: " This is a reminder of hope and possibility, of kindness and compassion, and perhaps most salient imagination and liberty. Through the imaginations of our childhoods, can we find our true selves liberated in adulthood? Chelsea Handler In her debut children's book, Rebecca Solnit reimagines a classic fairytale with a fresh, feminist Cinderella and new plot twists that will inspire young readers to change the world, featuring gorgeous silhouettes from Arthur Rackham on each page. In this modern twist on the classic story, Cinderella, who would rather just be Ella, meets her fairy godmother, goes to a ball, and makes friends with a prince. But that is where the familiar story ends. Instead of waiting to be rescued, Cinderella learns that she can save herself and those around her by being true to herself and standing up for what she believes.Rebecca Solnit is the author of more than twenty books including Men Explain Things to Me, Call Them by Their True Names, Hope in the Dark, and The Mother of All Questions.Arthur Rackham (1867&#8211 1939) was a prominent British illustrator of many classic children's books from The Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm to Sleeping Beauty. His watercolor silhouettes were featured in the original edition of Cinderella. "
    Content: Biographisches: " Arthur Rackham (1867-1939) was described by The London Times as one of the most eminent book illustrators of his <em class="albert-highlight">day</em> with a special place in the hearts of children. He was a prominent British illustrator of many classic children's books from The Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm to Sleeping Beauty to Fairy Tales by Hans Andersen and dozens more. His illustrations from the 1919 edition of Cinderella are timeless examples of his unique and beautiful watercolor sillouettes. " Rezension(2): "〈a href=http://www.publishersweekly.com target=blank〉〈img src=https://images.contentreserve.com/pw_logo.png alt=Publisher's Weekly border=0 /〉〈/a〉: February 25, 2019 In this progressive retelling, Solnit carefully excises nearly every aspect of the “Cinderella” tale that readers might find objectionable. No one falls in love, the prince wishes he was a farmer, and the stepsisters eventually apologize to Cinderella, who herself says, “It was very interesting to see <em class="albert-highlight">all</em> the fancy clothes... but even more interesting to see lizards become footwomen.” Every possible moral lesson is explicitly spelled out—“everyone can be a fairy godmother if they help someone who needs help, and anyone can be a wicked stepmother”—and the low-key action, which resolves in everyone finding the work that suits them, supports the idea that “there is no happily ever after, only... tomorrow... and the <em class="albert-highlight">day</em> after that.” Illustrations based on Rackham’s masterful, timeless silhouettes offer a counterpoint to a text that is very much of the moment. Ages 7–10. " Rezension(3): "〈a href=http://www.kirkusreviews.com target=blank〉〈img src=https://images.contentreserve.com/kirkus_logo.png alt=Kirkus border=0 /〉〈/a〉: With a little help from her fairy godmother, Cinderella takes care of business while learning how to be her best and freest self. With the avowed intention of creating a kinder vision of the familiar tale that also gets away from the invidious notion that marrying (preferably marrying up) is the main chance in life for women, Solnit (Call Them by Their True Names, 2018, Kirkus Prize winner in nonfiction) offers younger readers this revisionist Cinderella. She arrives at the ball attended by transformed footwomen, befriends Prince Nevermind (who really just wants to be a farmer), and, while her stepsisters take up careers in fashion, goes on to open a cake shop where she harbors <em class="albert-highlight">refugee</em> children. The author's efforts to get away from sexist tropes and language aren't entirely successful (one stepsister becomes a seamstress, for instance), and an analytical afterword in cramped type that rivals the tale itself for length further weighs down the wordy, lecture-laden narrative. Still, readers ready to question the assumptions innate in most variants, European ones in particular, will find this one refreshing. The carefully selected Rackham silhouettes, first published a century ago, invest Ella with proactive spirit while (as the author notes) sidestepping racial determinations (in skin color at least, if not hair texture). A story with a serious claim to universality again proves that it can bear a carriage full of messages. (lengthy source note) (Folktale. 8-10) COPYRIGHT(2019) Kirkus Reviews, <em class="albert-highlight">ALL</em> RIGHTS RESERVED. (Online Review) " Rezension(4): "〈a href=http://www.slj.com/ target=blank〉〈img src=https://images.contentreserve.com/schoollibraryjournal_logo.png alt=School Library Journal border=0 /〉〈/a〉: August 16, 2019 Gr 2-4- Though she still has plenty of dirty chores to do, Cinderella is not confined to household drudgery in this feminist reworking of the old tale. She's a good cook and bakes ginger cookies, and she's out and about visiting farms and the marketplace, becoming friends with <em class="albert-highlight">all</em> the workers there. On the <em class="albert-highlight">day</em> of the Prince's ball she's a skillful hairdresser for Pearlita and Paloma, those obnoxious stepsisters. And she's the most talented dancer when she herself arrives at the ball. Solnit tells the story in five numbered segments. She mostly follows the general scheme of Perrault, but this is not the romantic story of falling in love that he was telling. The fairy godmother, a little blue woman, shows up when Cinderella wishes that someone might help her. The familiar magic happens. Cinderella and Prince Nevermind (we don't know how or why the character names were devised) will become friends as both are liberated from their confining lives. In the lengthy closing section they are too young to marry but she owns a very successful bake shop, and he becomes a farm worker. Solnit explains how Ella (no more cinders) is a liberator-someone who helps others figure out how to be free. Selected silhouettes from Rackham's Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty work pretty well with the long narrative with its generous phrasing of conversations, descriptions, explanation of personality traits, and several philosophical lessons along the way. In a long afterword, the author discusses choices she made in selecting this story, reworking it, and choosing the Rackham illustrations. The liberator theme may be murky for many children. The feminization of some characters-the coachwoman, the footwomen, Cinderella's real mother the sea captain-will strike some readers as rather forced. Nonetheless, this is a version of the oft-told tale that will surely find a place among the copious retellings. VERDICT Give this variant to older fairy-tale fans. It could certainly be a fun discussion choice.-Margaret Bush, Simmons College, Boston Copyright 2019 School Library Journal, LLC Used with permission. "
    Language: English
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  • 5
    Online Resource
    Online Resource
    Sourcebooks
    ISBN: 9781402264047 , 9781402264030
    Content: " One year he'll be gone for one year and then we'll be together again and everything will be back to the way it should be. The day David left, I felt like my heart was breaking. Sure, any long&#8211 distance relationship is tough, but David was going to war to fight, to protect, to put his life in danger. We can get through this, though. We'll talk, we'll email, we won't let anything come between us. I can be on army girlfriend for one year. But will my sweet, soulful, funny David be the same person when he comes home? Will I? And what if he doesn't come home at all...? A tender and honest examination of love, longing, and loyalty in the face of modern war. Laura Ruby, author of Bad Apple While He Was Away is a wonderful love story with writing that is skillful and true. Amy Timberlake, author of That Girl Lucy Moon "
    Content: Biographisches: "Karen Schreck once had lunch with the Queen of Holland. There were many forks. Perhaps this inspired her (failed) attempt at waitressing. She lives outside Chicago with her husband and two children. Visit karenschreck.com/blog" Rezension(2): "A Soul Unsung: Karen Schreck pens a poignant and inspiring story of love and war, trials and tribulations, and finding oneself.-Blogger Susan, A Soul Unsung " Rezension(3): "In The Next Room:the relationship between Penna and her mom... was complicated and broken at times, but ultimately very powerful.- Zoe" Rezension(4): "I Devour Books: While He Was Away was a very moving, very well written story, and it sucked me in almost from the beginning.-Kreag" Rezension(5): "Fictionators:I loved that even though [Penna] felt weak, she made herself be strong- Kassiah" Rezension(6): "Blkosiner's Book Blog:...once I opened the book, I did not want to put it down. - Brandi" Rezension(7): "The Book Whisperer:Schreck's story will tax and strain your emotions, as well as, consume your attention way after the last page- The Book Whisperer " Rezension(8): "365 Days of Reading:...a subtly hopeful, emotionally moving novel.- Lauren " Rezension(9): "Confessions of a Bookaholic:I did really enjoy[ed] Karen's writing style and realistic portrayal of a young couple dealing with being apart.- Blogger Jessica, Confessions of a Bookaholic" Rezension(10): "To Read or Not To Read:... a powerful story about coping with change.- Blogger Marcie, To Read or Not To Read " Rezension(11): "LC's Adventures in Library Land:...about everything I could ask for in a book!- Blogger Lea, LC's Adventures in Library Land " Rezension(12): "Justin's Book Blog:I loved these characters.-Blogger Justin, Justin's Book Blog " Rezension(13): "Esther's Ever After:It keeps tugging at your heart, and it just doesn't let go.- Blogger Brenna, Esther's Ever After " Rezension(14): "Shortie Says:Inspiring, hopeful, and eye-opening...This story is so much more then a boy who leaves a girl for Iraq. Blogger Jena, Shortie Says " Rezension(15): "Emily's Crammed Bookshelf:Schreck did an amazing job with keeping things interesting." Rezension(16): "Librisnotes:a nuanced recounting of love, loyalty, loss, forgiveness and healing across three generations.- Blogger Librisnotes " Rezension(17): "〈a href=http://www.kirkusreviews.com target=blank〉〈img src=https://images.contentreserve.com/kirkus_logo.png alt=Kirkus border=0 /〉〈/a〉: April 15, 2012 When her boyfriend David leaves for a stint in Iraq, Penna is anxious and devastated, but eventually she finds ways to cope. At first, observing Penna change from a girl totally absorbed in her boy to one who has other concerns, friends and responsibilities is like watching paint dry. But the pace rapidly picks up as both David and Penna become more caught up in their immediate environments. Penna discovers information about a grandmother who has been missing in her life, gets pulled into <em class="albert-highlight">waiting</em> tables at her mother's restaurant and finds new friends with whom she can share her current life. In Iraq, David struggles with the mind-numbing work of patrols and the terror that interrupts it, and he focuses on an orphanage for Iraqi <em class="albert-highlight">refugee</em> children as a way to be useful. Strong characterization, the vivid setting of a small Oklahoma town and the clear depiction of present life, with Skype, e-mail and phones with their inadequate promise of instant communication, strengthen the narrative and ground it in the present. Paralleling Penna's story is her discovery of a grandmother who lost her first husband in World War II. The perils of war limn the memories of the women left behind and cast into relief both their devotion and their need to continue to live separate and independent lives. A strong entry in the growing genre of fiction about the Iraq war. (Fiction. 12 & up) COPYRIGHT(2012) Kirkus Reviews, <em class="albert-highlight">ALL</em> RIGHTS RESERVED. " Rezension(18): "〈a href=http://www.slj.com/ target=blank〉〈img src=https://images.contentreserve.com/schoollibraryjournal_logo.png alt=School Library Journal border=0 /〉〈/a〉: June 1, 2012Gr 9 Up- Penna is determined to be a positive Army girlfriend while her boyfriend, David, is stationed in Iraq. Faced with the prospect of a year without him, the 18-year-old is wrought with fear, worry, and loneliness. As relative newcomers to Killdeer, a small Oklahoma town, Penna and her mother have few ties to the community beyond the house and restaurant they inherited from her grandfather. Friendless and alone while her mother works long hours, Penna waits for phone calls from David and begins to uncover some family history in the attic. Her contact with him is infrequent, and instead of spending her time preparing her art portfolio for college, she lies in bed rereading his letters. In an attempt to pry Penna from her depression, her mother hires her as a server at the restaurant. Despite her lack of skills as a waitress, Penna begins to make new friends and a new purpose. As her maturity and self-awareness develop, she connects with her mother as well as her estranged grandmother. She also comes to terms with her separation from David. Teens will devour this title quickly despite some stilted dialogue and one-dimensional characters. The ending is realistic and void of any fairy-tale solutions that might diminish the harsh realities of what soldiers often face.- Lynn Rashid, Marriotts Ridge High School, Marriottsville, MDCopyright 2012 Library Journal, LLC Used with permission. "
    Language: English
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